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1941-06-17 The loss of Daniël Sajet

Crash site: Hatfield, Hertfordshire, GB

Crash cause: flying accident; stalled in a climbing turn

(Daniel Sajet)

Name

Sajet, Daniël


Amsterdam Zorgvlied Sajet

Rank

Sold II Vl, Lac, Pilot U/T

RAF VR 1149994

Decorations

None known

Born

10/2/1920

Place

Hilversum, Noord-Holland, NL

Squadron

No. 1 EFTS

Ops/hr

0/0

Aircraft

Tiger Moth Nr. T5834

Base

RAF Hatfield, Hertfordshire, GB

Mission

Training

Status

KIFA, stalled in a climbing turn

age

21

Killed

17/6/1941

Place

Hatfield, Hertfordshire, GB

Buried

His remains were cremated at Golders Green Crematorium, Hoop Lane, London. Source: CAD-MvD 5.050.5220/86

Reburied Gemeentelijke Begraafplaats Zorgvlied, Amsterdam, family grave D/II/116

Known to

OGS

yes

CWGC

yes

Memorial

Soesterberg

yes

Memorial

Other

yes

Vijfluik Loenen, Gelderland, NL

Vijfluik Sajet

GB arrival

Engelandvaarder; departure with Bruin Tammes on 1/8/1940 with a small sailing boat from Veere Harbour, Zeeland, NL.

Source: A. Dessing, 'Tulpen voor Wilhelmina', 2004, p. 95; NA 2.09.06-10141

Remarks

The crash took place on 16/6/1941. D. Sajet was taken to General Hospital 'Hatfield House' at Hatfield, where he died on 17/6/1941 00.55h.

Data confusion

OGS: 'leader aircraftmess' for leading aircraftman. Corrected in 2005.

CWGC: No.1 CFTS (Central Flying Training School). RAF Hatfield was base to No. 1 EFTS. More than 3.000 aviators were trained here, including many of the Dutch RAF aviators that would fly with 322 (Dutch) Squadron.


Front of RAF Form 1180, the Aircraft Accident Card, as photographed from the microfilm reader.

Note that the date could be read as 1944, but it should be 1941. Source: RAF Museum, Hendon, London, GB

Rear side of Sajet's Accident Card. Source: RAF Museum, Hendon, London, GB

Telegram reporting the death of Daniël Sajet. With thanks to Coen van den Heuvel

Former RAF Hatfield, Hertfordshire, area where D. Sajet crashed on 16/6/1941. The site has not been pinpointed. The map above dates from 2000 or earlier. The Aerodrome area has been completely reworked with Hertfordshire University buidings and housing estates. The De Havilland aluminium hangar, and the control tower on top of it, both build after the War, remain. Hatfield House was used as a hospital in WW2. Daniël Sajet died here. The cemetery above the 'H' of Hatfield in the bottom map, is a small CWGC cemetery, holding more casualties of military flying training at Hatfield in WW2.

Terrain of former RAF Hatfield, looking Northwest from the Eastern end of what used to be the runway. The site dates back to 1930, when the De Havilland Company purchased it for their aircraft production and testing. De Havilland Mosquito's were build here too. The base closed down in 1993. Hatfield 060129-1. Hatfield data: www.controltowers.co.uk

Former hangar of the De Havilland company, and RAF Hatfield control tower, with remains of the taxiway in front of it. Build 1952-54, at the time the largest building made in aluminium. Now reworked into what is claimed to be the largest fitness center of the world. Hatfield 060129-2


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