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Korean War Air Losses & Incidents Database for All Nations Opposing North Korea
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#Name (↑)First NamesRankMilitary ServiceHonoursStatusAircraft TypeTail NumberDateIncident (↑)SquadronGroup or WingCircumstances Of Incident        Notes        Links        Photo          
1 RCAF (Canada)Canadair North Star426 Sqd RCAF 'Thunderbirds'After consultations with the United States, it was determined that for the Air Force contribution, a squadron of transport aircraft would be the most valuable because the United States’ Military Air Transport Service (MATS) had a greatly reduced capability at that time. After the effort of the Berlin Airlift, a large proportion of MATS’ aircraft were undergoing extended maintenance and cleaning. Accordingly, the Cabinet approved the deployment of 426 Squadron on 19 July 1950, under the name of Operation HAWK. As it was, 426 Squadron had already begun making its own preparations for a possible deployment. As the RCAF’s only long-range transport squadron, they expected to be called upon to provide support to any Canadian contribution to the United Nations’ efforts.

426 Squadron’s planning included the use of six Canadair North Star aircraft, flying from one of the Northwest states in the United States for a period of one year. In this planning, the squadron was helped by the fact they had completed Operation Mobility in the past year, which saw them quickly deploy to Edmonton and operate from that location over several months.


North Star

2 CarewRobert DeanFLOFFRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)Air Medal (USA)F-86E Sabre52-28381953-04-17335th Fighter Interceptor: Chiefs
4th Ftr-Int GpYellow Sea, KoreaService Number J/37131. Born 1924 - Died 2012 Jewish General Hospital St. Bruno Canada. Served in WW2 as a Spitfire pilot. Korea 1953-03-15 - 1973-07-05.

CAREW, Flight Lieutenant Robert Dean (33697) - Air Medal (United States) - 4th Fighter Interceptor Wing (USAF) - Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 26 June 1954 and AFRO 362/54 dated 2 July 1954. Medal presented by U.S. Consul in Quebec City, 5 August 1954. Born 21 August 1924; enlisted in RCAF, 31 August 1942; awarded wings, October 1943. Trained on Hurricanes in Canada and flew an overseas tour with Nos.66 and 412 Squadrons; served in Air Forces of Occupation for seven months. Demobilized 19 February 19946; rejoined RCAF 5 November 1950 and trained on Vampires; then became No.1 OTU instructor. As of 22 January 1953, he was reported to have 1,165 hours on single engine aircraft including 129 on Vampires, 201 on T-33s and 25 on Sabres. Taken on strength of Special Force (Korea), 14 February 1953; taken on strength of 335th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, 18 February 1953; struck off strength 335th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, 5 July 1953; struck off strength Special Force (Korea), 5 July 1953. In Korea he flew 72 combat hours plus 18 hours 15 minutes non-combat on F-86 and five hours 55 minutes non-combat on T-33; once forced to bale out over sea after gliding 130 miles, 43,00 feet to 7,000 feet. Retired 20 November 1970. See PL-98811 for photograph. See H.A. Halliday, "In Korean Skies", Roundel, December 1963 and January 1964. “Flight Lieutenant Robert D. Carew distinguished himself by meritorious achievement while participating in aerial flight as pilot of an F-86 type aircraft, 4th Fighter Interceptor Wing, Fifth Air Force, from 5 April 1953 to 8 May 1953. During that period, Flight Lieutenant Carew demonstrated outstanding professional ability during sustained combat air operations over North Korea. Despite adverse weather conditions, hazardous terrain and numerically superior enemy fighter aircraft, Flight Lieutenant Carew accomplished numerous missions which contributed substantially to the success of United Nations operations. Through his keen flying ability, courage and exemplary devotion to duty. Flight Lieutenant Carew reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the Royal Canadian Air Force.”
3 FlemingSandiford BruceFLOFFRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)DFC (USA)336th Fighter Squadron4th Fighter Interceptor Wing1 Probable MiG-15 2 Damaged MiG-15. 1952-03-10 - 1952-06-12
br>The normal Sabre pilot tour was 100 missions; RCAF pilots were restricted to 50. Thus, just as they were beginning to get the hang of jet combat, they were pulled back to Canada. The only exception to the 50-mission rule was Flying Officer S.B. Fleming who arrived before details of the scheme had been settled; he flew 82 missions.
4 GloverErnest A 'Ernie'Flight LtRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)F-86 SabreF000174841952-09-08334th Fighter Interceptor: Eagles
4th Ftr-Int Gp1 MIG-15 Victory + 1 Damaged MiG-15

Flying number four position when a two-ship element of MIGs was intercepted. The F-86 flight closed, but in the evasive action the MIGs made a hard-right turn which the number one and two men were unable to follow. Flight Lieutenant Glover, being in a more advantageous position, fired, observing immediate hits. The MIGs dived from 40,000 to 15,000 feet and during one violent pull up, the number two MIG went out of control and plunged into the ground. The lead MIG with Flight Lieutenant Glover still firing reached the sanctuary of the Yalu River. By this demonstration of tactical skill Flight Lieutenant Glover destroyed one MIG and inflicted damage on another,
5 GloverErnest A 'Ernie'Flight LtRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)F-86 SabreF000174841952-09-09334th Fighter Interceptor: Eagles
4th Ftr-Int Gp1 MIG-15 Victory
6 GloverErnest A 'Ernie'Flight LtRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)F-86 SabreF000174841952-09-16334th Fighter Interceptor: Eagles
4th Ftr-Int Gp1 MIG-15 Victory
7 GloverErnest A 'Ernie'FLTLTRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)DFC, DFC (USA)F-86 Sabre334th Fighter Interceptor: Eagles
4th Ftr-Int Gp3 MiG-15 Victories. 2 Damaged MiG-15. 1952-06-15 - 1952-10-18.

Ernie Glover entered air combat during World War II flying night fighter missions in a Hawker Hurricane. Gaining valuable combat experience in Hurricanes, Ernie soon moved into the more powerful and formidable Hawker Typhoon, flying fighter missions into occupied Europe. On one such mission in 1943 over France, Ernie was blasted by German flak that downed his Typhoon forcing him into the hands of the Germans and a Prisoner Of War.

RCAF pilots in USAF marked Sabres flew over 900 combat missions with 9 confirmed MIG kills. Ernie happened to down 3 of those nine MIGs, the highest score of any RCAF pilot in Korea making him a distinguished combat pilot.

The Americans were generous in distributing Air Medals and their version of the Distinguished Flying Cross. Flight Lieutenant Ernest A. Glover, another “old sweat” from the Second World War, joined the USAF’s 334th Fighter Squadron at Kimpo (Seoul) in June 1952. Up until Aug. 26 he never saw a MiG; from then until the end of September he saw them nearly every day. He was ultimately credited with three MiG-15s destroyed, for which he was awarded both the American and Commonwealth DFC.

Glover sitting in his Canadian-built Sabre

.
8 LaFranceJoseph Claude AndreFLTLTRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)DFC (USA)F-86 SabreF000300031952-08-0516th Fighter Interceptor

39th Fighter-Interceptor: Cobra Squadron
35th Ftr-Int Wg1 MIG-15 Victory. Served Korea 1952-05-15 - 1952-09-26

Thanks to an informal old-boys network, most of the RCAF Sabre pilots were Second World War veterans. One youthful pilot, F/O J.C.A. LaFrance, complained to his superiors, arguing it was junior men like himself who most needed combat experience. LaFrance won his point—and a Korean assignment. He proved to be a very 'hot' pilot; on Aug. 5, 1952, he destroyed a MiG-15. LaFrance rose to the rank of major-general in the Canadian Armed Forces.

One of 22 Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) pilots on loan to the US Air Force in Korea, Flight Lieutenant Claude A LaFrance, as leader of a flight of 4 F-86 Sabre fighters, shot down a Mig-15 near Manchuria on 5 August 1952. At the time, Flight Lieutenant LaFrance was serving with 39th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, 51st Fighter Interceptor Wing. For this action and on return to Canada after 50 missions, he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal. He continued his career as a fighter pilot and appointed commanding officer of Escadron Tactique de Combat 433, commanding officer of Canadian Forces Base Winnipeg, Director General of Plans and Policy at NDHQ, commanding officer of 10 Tactical Air Group (army support) and Chief of Plans, Policy and Programs at NORAD HQ. He retired from the Canadian Forces in 1981 after 34 years of service in the rank of Major General. He has accumulated 5000 flying hours in more than 35 different types of fixed and rotary wing aircraft. From 1985 to 1989, he was Assistant Deputy Minister Aviation in Transport Canada, responsible for the technical and operational control of civil aviation in Canada. Later, as a consultant in international aeronautics, he led multidisciplinary teams to develop national systems for the control of civil aviation in Albania and Lebanon under mandates from the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). In 1994, he became President of Aerospatiale Canada Inc. which later became EADS Canada Inc. and retired from that position in 2005. He was inducted in the French Légion d’Honneur in the rank of Chevalier. He served on the boards of the Canadian Battlefields Foundation for which he was Senior VP and Chairman of the Trustees Committee and Unmanned Systems Canada (USC) as Chairman of the Strategic Planning Committee. He belonged to the Defence and Civil Aviation committees of the Aerospace Industries Association of Canada (AIAC) and to the French Académie de l’Air et de l’Espace. He passed away peacefully in Cornwall, Ontario, Canada on 6 July 2014 at the age of 85. Commemorated: Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum Wall of Honor

Far East Air Forces AP0925 dated 9 September 1952 gives following account of his MIG kill: 'First Lieutenant [sic] Claude A. Lafrance...is officially credited with the destruction of one MIG-15 type aircraft in aerial combat at 1540I on 5 August 1952 near Sariwon, Korea. Flying number three position in a flight of four F86 type aircraft, Lieutenant Lafrance closed on the leader of an element of two MIG-15s. Lieutenant Lafrance opened fire, scoring hits over the entire fuselage and engine section of the MIG. The enemy pilot was observed to eject himself in the vicinity of Sariwon.'

9 LévesqueJoseph Auguste OmerFlight LtRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)DFC (USA), American Air MedalF-86 SabreF000197941951-03-31334th Fighter Interceptor: Eagles
4th Ftr-Int Gp1 MIG-15 Victory

1950-12-01 - 1951-06-01. 71 sorties. It took him 10 years and two wars, but Canadian fighter pilot Omer Levesque finally got his fifth victory in the skies over Korea.

One of 22 pilots assigned by RCAF to USAF for combat experience

Flight Lieutenant J.A. Omer Lévesque, a Second World War veteran, was serving on exchange duties with the 4th Fighter Interceptor Wing when it went to Korea. On March 30, 1951, while escorting B-29 bombers on a daylight raid, he destroyed a MiG-15. He was subsequently awarded both an American Air Medal and an American Distinguished Flying Cross, DFC.

On March 31, 1951, Levesque was with two squadrons of Sabres protecting a large flight of B-29s attacking the bridges spanning the Yalu River, the boundary between North Korea and its Communist Chinese ally. He was flying as wingman to Major E.C. Fletcher when suddenly the squad leader called out that bandits were coming from the right. The Sabres dropped their auxiliary fuel tanks as two additional MiGs were spotted at 9 o’clock, “off our left wings and above us a bit.” Levesque’s flight turned toward these two enemy planes, which separated and banked away to evade the pursuing Sabres. Levesque later reported: “My MiG pulled up into the sun, probably trying to lose me in the glare. This was an old trick the Germans used to like to do—but this day I had dark sunglasses on, and I kept the MiG in sight.” The MiG leveled off, likely not realizing Levesque was still on his tail. The Canadian adjusted his illuminated gunsight for deflection shooting and banked steeply to turn inside the MiG, triggering a twisting dogfight that quickly spiraled down from 40,000 feet to 17,000 feet. Levesque was about 1,500 feet from the MiG when he opened fire. His aim was good: Six streams of .50-caliber bullets smashed into the MiG, which rolled violently to the right and continued rolling until it crashed into the ground. “I started to pull up, and saw another MiG diving from above me,” he continued. “I climbed into the sun at full throttle and started doing barrel rolls. The MiG disappeared.” His combat with the MiGs concluded, Levesque faced another danger, this time from friendly fire: “I went right through the B-29 formation and they all shot at me! Thank God they missed. I waggled my wings and they stopped firing, but lots of shells had just missed me.” Levesque suddenly realized that his fuel was approaching “bingo,” the point where he had just enough to get him back to base at Suwon, South Korea. As he headed home, alone with his thoughts, he could take pride in the fact that he was at last an ace. Omer Levesque was awarded the U.S. Distinguished Flying Cross for his role in the March 31 battle. He would complete 71 operational sorties with the 334th FIS before being sent home in June 1951.
10 LindsayJames Douglas 'Doug'Squadron LeaderRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)F-86 SabreF000203611952-10-1139th Fighter-Interceptor: Cobra Squadron
51st Ftr-Int Gp1 MIG-15 Victory
11 LindsayJames Douglas 'Doug'Squadron LeaderRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)F-86 SabreF000203611952-11-2639th Fighter-Interceptor: Cobra Squadron
51st Ftr-Int Gp1 MIG-15 Victory
12 LindsayJames Douglas 'Doug'SQDLDRRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)DFCF-86 Sabre39th Fighter-Interceptor: Cobra Squadron
51st Ftr-Int Gp2 MiG-15 Victories 3 Damaged MiG-15. 1952-07-15 - 1952-12-06

7 Victories WW2

He joined 403 (RCAF) Squadron on 7th October 1943. Lindsay was posted away from 403 for a while but rejoined the Squadron at Eindhoven in April 1944: shortly afterwards he became a Flight Commander and on the 7th May he shot down a Bf109 and damaged an Fw190. Another Fw190 fell to his guns on the 19th as well as on the 26th June. His most notable action occurred on the 2nd July when Lindsay shot down no less than 3 Bf109s in ONE MINUTE! For this he was awarded a DFC. On the 2nd August he "bagged" another Bf109. Lindsay's tour then ended but he again returned to 403 Squadron on the 2nd April 1945 and on the 17th probably destroyed an Fw190. Lindsay also flew with 416 Squadron from late April to mid-July. His score at the conclusion of the war was 7 aircraft confirmed destroyed. He stayed in the RCAF and in 1952 with the rank of Squadron Leader he served with the USAF in Korea on an exchange posting and flying F-86s (Sabres) with the 39th Squadron of the 51st Fighter Wing shot down MiG 15s on the 11th October and 26th November 1952. He also damaged 3 others.
13 ListonJ MCPTCanadian Army (Canada)DFCAuster Vl1952-08-131903 FlightShot down by 85mm shellThe Commonwealth Division, formed in the summer of 1951, had two Air Observation Post (AOP) Flights, Nos. 1903 and 1913. Ostensibly Royal Air Force units, they were manned almost entirely by army personnel. They were equipped with Auster VI aircraft, although one American L-19 was acquired when it was discovered that the portly Divisional Commander, Major-General A.J. Cassels, fitted poorly into an Auster. Korean AOP operations resembled the static, siege warfare of the First World War. Pilots flew alone and most sorties were limited to a depth of 5,000 yards behind enemy lines. They were also flown at between 3,000 and 5,000 feet, avoiding most of the small-calibre anti-aircraft fire which the Chinese routinely threw at the machines. In the summer of 1952 the enemy strengthened its anti-aircraft defences and conditions became most unpleasant for AOP pilots. The depth of penetration was reduced and operating altitudes increased. Commencing in July 1952, the Canadian Army began rotating AOP pilots through No. 1903 Flight. Capt. J.M. Liston arrived on July 31, 1952, and was shot down on Aug. 13. He was observing a Chinese artillery position and had gone to 7,200 feet to avoid both anti-aircraft fire and a planned USAF strike. Height did not save him. An 85-mm shell from an undetected battery struck the after fuselage, almost completely severing the tail which was held only by the rudder cables. He parachuted into Chinese hands and a year of captivity. Liston’s successor in No. 1903 Flight was Capt. Peter Tees who served from Sept. 15, 1952, to June 1953. Flying in a Korean winter was often uncomfortable, as shown by entries in his logbook. “Bloody cold,” he wrote on Nov. 18 and Dec. 21, 1952. “Very cold,” he wrote on Dec. 20. “A freezing aircraft,” he noted on Jan. 6, 1953. Tees also reported snowstorms, turbulence, rough running engines and cracked exhaust pipes. He had several outstanding sorties, the most notable being on May 3, 1953, when Royal Canadian Regiment positions came under fire from infiltrating Chinese infantry and armoured forces. The infantry called down artillery fire on their own positions. Tees arrived at first light and spotted known and previously unknown targets. He directed excellent shooting and was thwarted only when the Chinese retreated under a dense smokescreen. Ultimately, Tees was awarded a Commonwealth DFC—the first to a member of the Canadian Army since 1918.
14 LoveRobert John 'Bob'USAFF-86 Sabre335th Fighter Interceptor: Chiefs
4th Fighter Interceptor WingDecember 28, 1917 – December 6, 1986 was a United States Air Force flying ace during the Korean War, shooting down six MiG-15 jet aircraft in 1952. He was assigned to the 4th Fighter-Interceptor Wing's 335th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron.

Major Robert J. Bob' Love (1917-1986) had an impressive military and civilian aviation career. Born in Grand Prairie, Alberta, Canada, his family moved to New York when he was young. Love learned to fly in 1940 and before the United States entered World War II, he joined the Royal Canadian Air Force. After the United States joined the war, Love joined the United States Army Air Corps and flew a variety of aircraft, including Lockheed P-38s and North American P-51 Mustangs, but was kept in a training command stateside. Love represented the USAF in the 1947 and 1949 Cleveland Air Races. In the late 1940s, Love left the Air Corps to become a Commanding Officer in the Air National Guard. His unit was activated for the Korean War, and he was eventually transferred to the 4th Fighter Interceptor Wing, where he flew North American F-86 Sabre jets. He flew over 50 combat missions between January - March 1952 and became an ace by shooting down six MiG MiG-15 Fagots. After the Korean War, Love left the military to become a test pilot for Northrop Aircraft where he tested the Northrop F-89 Scorpion, Northrop F-20 (F-5G) Tigershark, and Northrop T-38 Talon. After his stint at Northrop, he spent time in Central America as a mercenary fighter pilot in the wars between El Salvador and Nicaragua, and later tried to establish a rubber tree plantation in Guatemala. He returned to the United States and had a career flying as an executive pilot for a number of firms, including for Golden Industries. In 1964, Love raced a Mustang in the inaugural Reno Air Races; he crossed the finish line first, but lost the championship on points based on previous heats. He continued to be active in the Reno Races and for many years was the official Reno Race Check Pilot, approving new race pilots and recently modified World War II fighter-racers. Love was also active in the western United States air show circuit where he had a featured aerobatic act flying his Mustang P-51D.
15 MacKayJohn 'Johnnie'FLTLT (SQDLDR ?)RCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)DFC & Bar, Air Medal (USA)F-86 Sabre39th Fighter-Interceptor: Cobra Squadron
51st Fighter Interceptor Wing1 MiG-15 destroyed. 1953-03-15 - 953-07-15

Service Number J/12635. WW2 401 Sqd (RCAF) 11+ Victories WW2 including a share in the first recorded destruction of Me262 Jet Fighter.
16 MacKenzieAndrew Robert 'Andy'SQLDRRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)DFCRMCF-86F Sabre51-129061952-12-0539th Fighter-Interceptor: Cobra Squadron
51st Ftr-Int GpDowned by friendly fire while attacking MiGs1952-11-15 - 1954-12-05

Born 1920-08-10 Montreal Died 2009-09-21 Kemptville Ont. J/10976. 8.25 Victories WW2.

Highly experienced fighter pilot on exchange with the USAF in Korea, had been flying an F-86 Sabre jet when he was shot down by a comrade. It was the second time, in two wars, that he'd been shot down by American so-called friendly fire. Flying at 42,000 feet along the western coast of Korea over the Yellow Sea toward the mouth of the Yalu River, Mackenzie, one of 22 RCAF pilots to fly in combat during the Korean War, had spotted two enemy MiG-15 jets. Informing his flight leader that he was going after them, he peeled off in pursuit. Unfortunately, Major Jack Saunders of the 139th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, 51st Interceptor Wing, didn't hear him and headed in the opposite direction after his own targets. Breaking off his attack - it was strictly forbidden to attack without cover - Mackenzie was climbing to rejoin his leader when another Sabre raked his jet with fire. Since Sabres and MiG-15s both featured swept-back wings, they were sometimes mistaken for each other in the heat of battle. As Major Saunders engaged two MiGs, Mackenzie, a Second World War ace with 8¼ victories, noticed bullets streaking just over his head. 'Before I could take any evasive action, my canopy was blown off. There were two strikes on my right elevator, followed by three more in rapid succession on the fuselage. I tried to break off to evade more fire, but my aircraft was out of control. I was starting to roll to the left and couldn't stop. In a few seconds I was barrelling to earth. I bailed out.' A few minutes later, Mr. MacKenzie came to rest on the ground. Unfortunately, Communist Chinese soldiers were waiting for him. Now his nightmare started, a hellishly long one that included poor food, intensive interrogations and 18 months spent in solitary confinement in Manchuria. His captors did their best to break his spirit but he never gave up hope.

Then he found himself in the Chinese prison, where he endured harsh treatment, but wasn't physically tortured. Always cold and hungry, he refused to co-operate and provide military secrets. As punishment, he was forced, for three long months, to sit at attention all day on the edge of his bed. In 1997, he described his time in solitary: 'Every minute was an hour and every hour was a day and every day was a week. Nobody knew I was still alive. Every day, [the Chinese] reminded me they could shoot me and nobody would know the difference.' Finally, in April, 1953, things changed for the better. He got a bigger room, the guards were more friendly, he was given books to read. He also made contact with one of the other prisoners. Mackenzie decided to make things a bit easier on himself and offered to draft a statement. The problem was, how was he shot down deep in China but picked up in North Korea? The answer was simple enough, he had drifted to North Korea on his parachute! This document completed, they next tried to achieve another about germ warfare. Mackenzie went berserk, which completely unnerved them. Finally, two years to the minute after he had been shot down, Mr. MacKenzie, now 70 pounds lighter, walked into freedom when he crossed into Hong Kong on Dec. 5, 1954. During his imprisonment, his mother had died without knowing if her son were alive or dead.


17 MageeArthurLTCanadian Army assigned to USAF (Canada)ObserverT-6D TexanRoyal Canadian RegimentAs early as July 1950 it was realized that jet fighters were too fast and fuel hungry to hunt for ground targets. If an objective was found and marked, the F-80s and F-84s could deliver a telling load of rockets, bombs and napalm. But who was to find the targets? The American Army improvised so-called “Mosquito” Flights. In this instance the “Mosquito” was not the sleek, fast combat aircraft of the Second World War. It was a T-6 Harvard or Texan to Americans. These reconnoitred for targets, then marked them with smoke grenades and rockets. The pilots were members of the USAF while the backseat observers were army personnel. Operating singly and at low altitude, the aircraft were vulnerable to ground fire. At least 17 Canadian Army officers served as “Mosquito” observers, 15 during the war itself and two following the Armistice. Nine were decorated by the Americans. On average, they completed approximately 45 sorties during a three-month attachment. However, Lieutenants Arthur Magee of the RCRs and William E. Ward of the Lord Strathcona’s Horse flew 162 and 88 sorties, respectively.
18 RuddellGeorge InkermanLTCOLUSAFSilver Star with one Oak Leaf Cluster, Legion of Merit, Distinguished Flying Cross with 5 OLCs, Soldiers Medal, Bronze Star and the Air Medal with 29 OLCF-86 Sabre39th Fighter-Interceptor: Cobra Squadron
51st Fighter Interceptor WingBorn Winnipeg Canada on January 21, 1919 Died The Dalles, Oregon, on February 27, 2015. AFSN: FR-8826A/0-36054. 2.5 Victories WW2, 8 Victories Korea

Associate degree in aeronautical engineering at Los Angeles City College before enlisting in the Army Air Forces as a 22- year-old aviation cadet on October 21, 1941. He graduated with Class 42-E at Luke Field, Arizona on May 20, 1942. Flying a P-47D out of Ashford, England, he shot down one Me-109 and shared in the destruction of a FW-190 on July 25, 1944. Moving to France, he downed a Bf 109 on August 10 1944. After the war, Ruddell commanded the 82nd and 83rd Fighter-Interceptor Squadrons. In July 1952 volunteered for duty in Korea and later become commander of the 39th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron. Downing the first of eight MiG-15s on November 17, 1952, in April 1953 he became an ace when he bagged two MiG-15s back-to-back on the 11th and 12th April 1953, and destroyed another MiG five days later. In May another three MiGs, one each on the 18th, 26th and 29th. He scored his final victory on June 19 1953. After the Korean War, Ruddell was promoted to colonel and commanded the 479th and 33rd Tactical Fighter Wings. During the Vietnam War, although assigned to a non-flying job at Headquarters MACV in Saigon, he logged several missions as a C-47 pilot. He returned to the States in 1965 and retired on November 1, 1970.
19 SpurrLawrence EFLLTRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)F-86 SabreF000178071952-07-1425th Fighter-Interceptor51st Ftr-Int Gp1 MIG-15 Victory
20 SpurrLawrence E 'Larry'FLTLTRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)DFC (USA)F-86 Sabre25th Fighter-Interceptor51st Fighter Interceptor Wing1952-04-10 - 1952-07-29
21 TeesPeterCPTCanadian Army (Canada)DFCAuster Vl1953-05-031903 FlightThe Commonwealth Division, formed in the summer of 1951, had two Air Observation Post (AOP) Flights, Nos. 1903 and 1913. Ostensibly Royal Air Force units, they were manned almost entirely by army personnel. They were equipped with Auster VI aircraft, although one American L-19 was acquired when it was discovered that the portly Divisional Commander, Major-General A.J. Cassels, fitted poorly into an Auster. Korean AOP operations resembled the static, siege warfare of the First World War. Pilots flew alone and most sorties were limited to a depth of 5,000 yards behind enemy lines. They were also flown at between 3,000 and 5,000 feet, avoiding most of the small-calibre anti-aircraft fire which the Chinese routinely threw at the machines. In the summer of 1952 the enemy strengthened its anti-aircraft defences and conditions became most unpleasant for AOP pilots. The depth of penetration was reduced and operating altitudes increased. Commencing in July 1952, the Canadian Army began rotating AOP pilots through No. 1903 Flight. Capt. J.M. Liston arrived on July 31, 1952, and was shot down on Aug. 13. He was observing a Chinese artillery position and had gone to 7,200 feet to avoid both anti-aircraft fire and a planned USAF strike. Height did not save him. An 85-mm shell from an undetected battery struck the after fuselage, almost completely severing the tail which was held only by the rudder cables. He parachuted into Chinese hands and a year of captivity. Liston’s successor in No. 1903 Flight was Capt. Peter Tees who served from Sept. 15, 1952, to June 1953. Flying in a Korean winter was often uncomfortable, as shown by entries in his logbook. “Bloody cold,” he wrote on Nov. 18 and Dec. 21, 1952. “Very cold,” he wrote on Dec. 20. “A freezing aircraft,” he noted on Jan. 6, 1953. Tees also reported snowstorms, turbulence, rough running engines and cracked exhaust pipes. He had several outstanding sorties, the most notable being on May 3, 1953, when Royal Canadian Regiment positions came under fire from infiltrating Chinese infantry and armoured forces. The infantry called down artillery fire on their own positions. Tees arrived at first light and spotted known and previously unknown targets. He directed excellent shooting and was thwarted only when the Chinese retreated under a dense smokescreen. Ultimately, Tees was awarded a Commonwealth DFC—the first to a member of the Canadian Army since 1918.
22 WardWilliam ELTCanadian Army assigned to USAF (Canada)ObserverT-6D TexanLord Strathcona’s HorseAs early as July 1950 it was realized that jet fighters were too fast and fuel hungry to hunt for ground targets. If an objective was found and marked, the F-80s and F-84s could deliver a telling load of rockets, bombs and napalm. But who was to find the targets? The American Army improvised so-called “Mosquito” Flights. In this instance the “Mosquito” was not the sleek, fast combat aircraft of the Second World War. It was a T-6 Harvard or Texan to Americans. These reconnoitred for targets, then marked them with smoke grenades and rockets. The pilots were members of the USAF while the backseat observers were army personnel. Operating singly and at low altitude, the aircraft were vulnerable to ground fire. At least 17 Canadian Army officers served as “Mosquito” observers, 15 during the war itself and two following the Armistice. Nine were decorated by the Americans. On average, they completed approximately 45 sorties during a three-month attachment. However, Lieutenants Arthur Magee of the RCRs and William E. Ward of the Lord Strathcona’s Horse flew 162 and 88 sorties, respectively.
23 DavidsonRobert Tremayne Pillsbury 'Bob'WNGCMDRRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)DFC, Croix de Guerre, Air Medal (USA), UN Medal, CDF-86 Sabre1952335th Fighter Interceptor: Chiefs
4th Fighter Interceptor Wing6 Victories WW2. Died 1975. Served Korea 1952-09-15 - 1952-12-07 51 Missions

From Vancouver Joins RAF in 1937 Posted w/ 30 Sqd flying Hurricanes He fought in Greece against the Italians in 1940; and the Germans in April 1941 On 6 March 1942 he flies a Hurricane off HMS Indomitable to Ratmalana Ceylon On 5 April 1942 scrambled against a large Japanese raid against the island flying BG827/RS-W he claims a Val and a Zero s/d. Flew Typhoons from April 1943 W/Co He leads 121 Typhoon Wing (Nos.174 175 and 245 Sqds) in the 2nd TAF from 13 Nov 1943. On 8 Jan 1944 flying a Long Range Sweep N of Paris he claims a twin-engined German transport shared s/d w/ P/O Dickie from 245 Sqd. W/Co Flying w/ 143 Typhoon wing from 23 Jan til 8 May 1944. (Nos 438 439 and 440 Sqds). On 20 March 1944 he leads three pilots from 438 Sqd to strafe targets between Cherbourg and Alderney. On 27 March 1944 he led 9 Typhoons from 439 Sqd to the Cotentin. On 8 May 1944 leading 438 Sqd on a raid on the Douai marshalling yard force-landed in France after engine failure was reported MIA. In Sept 1944 returned as an evader having served w/ the resistance for three months. He claimed 2 Japanese 2 Italian and 2 German vict = 6. Postwar he flew Vampires and Meteors as OC 421 Sqd F-86 pilot He served in Korea with the USAF

Of his Korea tour he remarked, 'Got in a few good scraps with the MIGs. I made a couple of them smoke.' See H.A. Halliday, 'In Korean Skies', Roundel, December 1963 and January 1964. Citation: 'Wing Commander Robert T.P. Davidson distinguished himself by meritorious achievement while participating in aerial combat as a pilot of an F-86 type aircraft, 4th Fighter Interceptor Wing, Fifth Air Force, flying missions against enemies of the United Nations from 29 September to 25 October 1952. While flying combat air patrols and various other type missions deep into enemy territory, many times against a superior number of enemy aircraft, his dedication to duty and demonstrated skill were a magnificent contribution to the successful completion of the assigned mission. As a result of his fortitude and courage on these occasions he has brought credit to himself, members of the United Nations Forces, the Royal Canadian Air Force, and the Far East Air Forces.'
24 LambrosAndrewFlight LtRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)DFC, DFC (USA), Air Medal (USA)F-86 Sabre39th Fighter-Interceptor: Cobra Squadron
51st Fighter Interceptor Wing2 MiG-15 damaged Korea. 1952-10-14 - 1953-03-10.

Service Number J/49644. US DFC, AFRO 742/53

LAMBROS, Flying Officer Andrew, DFC (49644) - Distinguished Flying Cross (United States) - 39th Squadron, 51st Fighter Interceptor Wing (USAF) - Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 14 November 1953 and AFRO 742/53 dated 11 December 1953 and Canada Gazette dated 14 November 1953. Home in Wiarton, Ontario; enlisted in Ottawa, 18 December 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 16 May 1941), No.19 EFTS (graduated 15 July 1941), and No.11 SFTS (graduated 7 October 1941). Awarded DFC, 13 February 1945 for services with No.438 Squadron. Attached to Headquarters, USAF, 28 August 1952; to Travis Air Force Base, 15 October 1952; taken on strength, 39th Squadron, Suwon, 22 October 1952. First sortie on 2 November 1952. Appointed Deputy Commander, "D" Flight, 23 December 1952. Damaged one MIG-15 on 22 January 1953. Acted as Wing Leader for three squadrons, 23 January 1953. Damaged another MIG-15, 31 January 1953. Wing Leader for three squadron on 17 February 1953. Tour completed 24 February 1953; struck off strength of Special Force (Korea) 10 March 1953. Had met MIGs on nine of 50 sorties including four with close brushes. Flew 50 sorties (80 combat hours plus 20 hours 30 minutes non-combat). See PL-36295 for good wartime photograph. See H.A. Halliday, "In Korean Skies", Roundel, December 1963 and January 1964. “Flying Officer Andrew Lambros distinguished himself by meritorious achievement while participating in aerial flight in the Korean conflict as a pilot of F-86 type aircraft, 39th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, Fifth Air Force from 2 November 1952 to 18 December 1952. Many times, often against superior numbers of the enemy, he has displayed courage, skill and aggressiveness which has contributed greatly to the success of the mission. Through his skill and airmanship and unfailing devotion to duty, Flying Officer Lambros has brought great credit upon himself, the United States Air Force and the Royal Canadian Air Force.”
25 MalkinHarryRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)DFC & Bar, AFCService N umber J/15521. July 1950 Korea. No details
26 WarrenDouglas 'Duke'FLTLTRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)DFC, CD, Air Medal (USA)F-86 Sabre39th Fighter-Interceptor: Cobra Squadron
51st Fighter Interceptor WingService Number J/9735. May 28, 1922 – August 27, 2011. Canadian air force pilot and commander. He shared the nickname "Duke" with his identical twin brother, Bruce (Duke) Warren, who died in 1951. Douglas was known for participating as a pilot in the Dieppe Raid in World War II, and won the Distinguished Flying Cross in 1945. Doug's memoirs, titled "Gemini Flight" chronicled his and his brother's flying experiences. Commanding Officer of 410 F86 Sabre Squadron at RAF North Luffenham, England in 1952.
27 NicholsGrant HFLTLTRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)Air Medal (USA)F-86 Sabre16th Fighter Interceptor51st Fighter Interceptor Wing1 Probable MiG-15. 1953-01-15 - 1953-05-09
28 NixonW GFLOFFRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)Air Medal (USA)F-86 Sabre16th Fighter Interceptor, 25th Fighter-Interceptor35th Ftr-Int Wg1952-03-10 - 1952-07-19
29 DonaldJ DFLOFFRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)1952-04-01 - 1952-05-05 Posted home before being combt-ready
30 HaleE BGRPCPTRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)DFC (USA)F-86 Sabre16th Fighter Interceptor35th Ftr-Int Wg1952-04-22 - 1952-05-28
31 LowryR EFLLTRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)Air Medal (USA)F-86 Sabre25th Fighter-Interceptor51st Ftr-Int Gp1952-07-15 - 1952-11-27
32 SmithE GSQDLDRRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)Air Medal (USA)F-86 Sabre334th Fighter Interceptor: Eagles
4th Ftr-Int Gp1952-08-15 - 1952-12-11
33 EvansFrederick WilliamFLTLTRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)DFC, Air Medal (USA)F-86 Sabre334th Fighter Interceptor: Eagles
4th Ftr-Int GpWW2 Veteran Destroyed 1x FW190. Born in St. John, New Brunswick, Canada in 1919 Died Melbourne FL July 12 2009. Between the wars, he was an air force flying instructor and a member of the Blue Devils first all jet Canadian aerobatic team, which performed over the east coast of the United States and Canada. Served Korea 1952-12-15 - 1953-04-11

Air Medal (United States) - 334th Fighter Interceptor Squadron (USAF) - Awarded as per AFRO 742/53 dated 11 December 1953 and Canada Gazette dated 14 November 1953. Born in Saint John, New Brunswick, 1919; home in St. Thomas (clerk and salesman). Enlisted in Saint John, 17 February 1939. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 2 April 1943), No.7 EFTS (graduated 28 May 1943) and No.14 SFTS (graduated 1 October 1943). Commissioned July 1943. Overseas he destroyed one FW.190 and shared in the destruction of another. Postwar Vampire aerobatic pilot. See photo PL-90156. Taken on strength, Special Force, 14 December 1952; taken on strength of 334th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, 24 December 1952; struck off strength, 334th FIS, 9 April 1953; struck off strength Special Force, 11 April 1953. Flew 75 hours five minutes in combat; claimed one locomotive and four rail cars destroyed. For further details see Second World War RCAF awards data base. See H.A. Halliday, "In Korean Skies", Roundel, December 1963 and January 1964. “Flight Lieutenant Evans distinguished himself by meritorious achievement while participating in aerial flight as a pilot of an F-86 type aircraft, 4th Fighter Interceptor Wing, Fifth Air Force, from 8 January 1953 to 13 February 1953. During that period, Lieutenant [sic] Evans successfully completed numerous combat missions in support of United Nations operations in Korea. Although often faced with determined enemy opposition, the courage, aggressiveness and degree of skill with which Flight Lieutenant Evans conducted his assignment contributed greatly to the ultimate success of the assigned missions. Through his courage, professional ability and exemplary devotion to duty, Flight Lieutenant Evans reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the Royal Canadian Air Force.”
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34 BlissWilliam Hamilton ForsterFLLTRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)Air Medal (USA)334th Fighter Interceptor: Eagles
4th Ftr-Int GpService Number J/22835. Served in Korea: 1953-04-14 - 1953-07-17

Air Medal (United States) - 4th Fighter Interceptor Wing (USAF) - Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 26 June 1954 and AFRO 362/54 dated 2 July 1954. Born in Toronto, 8 June 1923; enlisted in RCAF, 31 July 1941; served overseas with No.412 Squadron; discharged 7 September 1945. Reenlisted 9 November 1948 and flew with No.410 Squadron aerobatic team. Retired 2 February 1971. See PL-90394 for photograph. See H.A. Halliday, "In Korean Skies", Roundel, December 1963 and January 1964. “Flight Lieutenant William H. Bliss distinguished himself by meritorious achievement while participating in aerial flight as a pilot, 4th Fighter Interceptor Wing, Fifth Air Force, from 4 May 1953 to 16 June 1953. Flying an F-86 type aircraft, Flight Lieutenant Bliss accomplished many missions in support of United Nations operations in Korea. Although often faced with determined enemy opposition, the courage, aggressiveness and degree of skill with which Flight Lieutenant Bliss conducted his assignment contributed greatly to the ultimate success of the assigned missions. Through his personal courage, outstanding airmanship and exemplary devotion to duty, Flight Lieutenant Bliss reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces and the Royal Canadian Air Force.”
35 FoxWilliam WhiteSQDLDRRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)Air Medal (USA)16th Fighter Interceptor35th Ftr-Int WgService Number J/10965. Born 1920 Died July 8, 2010, Served Korea 1953-05-15 - 1953-10-31

Air Medal (United States) - 16th Fighter Interceptor Wing (USAF) - Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 26 June 1954 and AFRO 362/54 dated 2 July 1954. Joined RCAF, June 1941; wings April 1942; flew on tour with No.115 (Bomber Reconnaissance) Squadron (Bolingbrokes and Venturas). Posted to England in 1944 for transport flying. Continued on transport duties when he returned to Canada; attached to No.420 (Auxiliary) Squadron in 1949 as instructor; to RCAF Station Chatham, 1952. Attached to Special Force (Korea), 14 May to 6 November 1953, serving with 16th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, 22 May to 31 October 1953. Flew 98 hours 20 minutes (combat) and 59 minutes 55 minutes (non- combat) in Korea. Photo PL-110016 shows him. Medal presented at American Embassy, London, 1 March 1955. See H.A. Halliday, "In Korean Skies", Roundel, December 1963 and January 1964. “Squadron Leader William W. Fox distinguished himself by meritorious achievement during the period 2 June 1953 to 27 July 1953 while participating in twenty combat missions against the enemy over North Korea as pilot of an F-86 type aircraft, 51st Fighter Interceptor Wing, Fifth Air Force. During frequent encounters with high performance enemy jet aircraft, his courage, aggressiveness and proficiency contributed greatly to the ultimate success of the assigned mission. Through his valour, outstanding airmanship and devotion to duty on these occasions Squadron Leader Fox has reflected great credit upon himself and the United Nations Forces.”
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36 MullinJ BFLOFFRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)F-86 Sabre335th Fighter Interceptor: Chiefs
4th Ftr-Int Gp1953-06-15 - 1953-11-25. Arrived too late to see combat
37 WarrenDSQDLDRRCAF assigned to USAF (Canada)39th Fighter-Interceptor: Cobra Squadron
51st Fighter Interceptor Wing1953-07-15 - 1953-12-02. Arrived too late to see combat

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