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Paul McGuiness RAAF Archive
Paul McGuiness is an Australian aviation researcher and historian. Using primary sources he has assembled detailed information on the history of each plane
used by Australians and Australian forces in WWl and WW2, and on personnel involved.

This page contains many names, dates, locations. To help find the one(s) you're interested in, use our Highlighting facility.
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History of Australian Military Aviation

First World War

Armstrong Whitworth FK3

Avro 504

Bristol F2b Fighter

Fairey Aviation Model lllD Seaplane

Martinsyde G.100 G 102 Elephant

Maurice Farman S.11 Shorthorn

Royal Aircraft Factory BE2

Royal Aircraft Factory BE12

Royal Aircraft Factory RE.8

Royal Aircraft Factory SE5A Experimental Scout

Sopwith Camel B Series

Sopwith Camel C D E F Series

Sopwith Snipe

Sopwith Scout (Pup)

Sopwith 1½ Strutter

Supermarine Seagull lll

Supermarine Southampton Mk 1

Westland Wapiti


Post First World War

De Havilland DH.9A

Royal Aircraft Factory SE.5A

Avro 504K


Second World War

458 Sqd Wellingtons

460 Sqd Wellingtons

466 Sqd Wellingtons


Further Information:

Aces and Aviators WWl Database

Material Relating to Australia

Aircraft Types Used By Australian Forces World War l

De Havilland DH5 Fighter

The Airco DH.5 was a British First World War single-seat biplane fighter aircraft. It was designed and manufactured at British aviation company Airco. Development was led by the aircraft designer Geoffrey de Havilland as a replacement for the obsolete Airco DH.2. The DH.5 was one of the first British fighter designs to include the improved Constantinesco gun synchronizer, which allowed a forward-firing machine gun to fire through the propeller faster and more reliably than the older mechanical gears. It was also one of the earliest biplanes to feature a marked 'back-stagger' of its wings. Despite these advances, by the time the DH.5 was fielded, it was already notedly inferior to other fighters that had entered into production and thus proved to be both unpopular and unsatisfactory amongst the pilots of the Royal Flying Corps. As such, the type was quickly withdrawn from service as soon as supplies of the Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.5 permitted.

A9263

00Jul17 Built as Serial A9263 the 101st of 200 De Havilland designed DH5 Scout aircraft built in the Serial Range A9163 to A9362 by the Aircraft Manufacturing Company (Airco) in their UK factory at Hendon, London UK. Built to Contract 87/A/1286 dated 13th January 1917. Fitted with an 110hp (82kW), 9-cylinder Le Rhône 9J Rotary Engine No.WD35626.

00Aug17 Taken on charge by the Royal Flying Corps (RFC).

11Aug17 Allocated to the Allied Expeditionary Force. Aircraft disassembled, packed into cases and dispatched to the Allied Expeditionary Force, No.2 Aircraft Servicing Depot at Fienvillers, 34km NW of Amiens, France.

02Sep17 Received for assembly and testing by 2ASD.

22Sep17 Allocated to No.68 (Australian) Sqn at Baizieux aerodrome, 24km NE of Amiens France.

23Sep17 Ferried on a 15 min flight from 2ASD to 68 Sqn by 2nd Lt C.C Sands.

24Sep17 Taken on strength and issued to B Flight, aircraft assigned to 2nd Lt CC Sands.

25Sep17 The aircraft was painted with a single white band immediately forward of the tail assembly as a squadron identifier. Also, the number 6 was painted in white on each side of the fuselage signifying a B Flight machine.

29Sep17 Test flown over the ensuing three days to ensure the aircraft was ready for combat.

30Sep17 2nd Lt Wilson departed for an air-to-air gun test but shot two holes in his airscrew when he opened fire.

02Oct17 Lt Sands departed Baizieux on 1st combat mission at 1200 hrs on a 2hrs 15 min Close Offensive Patrol near Bourlon Wood. Enemy aircraft were sighted but dived away before they could be engaged.

20Nov17 Lt S.W Ayers departed Baizieux at 0820 hrs accompanied by five other B Flight machines led by CPT Wilson on a Special Mission flight to provide close air support to Allied ground forces on the opening day of the Battle of Cambrai. After dropping their bombs on the Hindenburg Line the aircraft divided into pairs and proceeded to strafe troops, trenches, artillery batteries and other targets of opportunity.

23Nov17 Lt ‘Sid’ Ayers departed Baizieux at 1030 hrs for a Special Mission against troop concentrations near the village of Fontaine and gun emplacements near Bourlon Wood. The aircraft was badly shot up by AA over Bourlon Wood but Ayers, suffering from grievous wounds, managed to crash near Allied lines and was rescued from the wreckage. Unfortunately he succumbed to his wounds the following day.

AFC pilot Lt Sydney Winton Ayers (24) single of Cootamundra NSW is buried in Grave No.ID12 of the Lebucquiere Communal Cemetery Extension, Lebucquiere, at Arras in the Nord Pas de Calais, France. He is also remembered at Location 187 in the Commemorative Area at the Australian War Memorial, Canberra ACT.

From 23Sep17 until its last flight with 68 Sqn on 22Nov17 the aircraft accumulated a total of 52 hrs 38 min flight time spread over 52 flights. Combat time was 35 hrs 05 min amassed over 24 flights.

A9271

00Jul17 Built as Serial A9271 the 109th of 200 De Havilland designed DH5 Scout aircraft built in the Serial Range A9163 to A9362 by the Aircraft Manufacturing Company (Airco) in their UK factory at Hendon, London UK. Built to Contract 87/A/1286 dated 13th January 1917. Fitted with an 110hp (82kW), 9-cylinder Le Rhône 9J Rotary Engine No.WD35654.

00Aug17 Taken on charge by the Royal Flying Corps (RFC).

11Aug17 Allocated to the Allied Expeditionary Force. Aircraft disassembled, packed into cases and dispatched to the Allied Expeditionary Force, No.2 Aircraft Servicing Depot at Fienvillers, 22km NNW of Amiens, France.

04Sep17 Received for assembly and testing by 2ASD.

22Sep17 Allocated to No.68 (Australian) Sqn at Baizieux aerodrome, 24km NE of Amiens France.

25Sep17 Ferried on a 15 min flight from 2ASD to 68 Sqn by 2nd Lt I.C.F Agnew.

25Sep17 Taken on strength and issued to A Flight. Aircraft assigned to 2nd Lt I.C.F Agnew

28Sep17 Flown by Lt Agnew on several test flights over two days in preparation for combat.

29Sep17 The aircraft was painted with a single white band immediately forward of the tail assembly as a squadron identifier. No numeral or letter was painted on this aircraft.

01Oct17 Departed Baizieux at 1430 hrs on 1st combat mission, a two hour and five minute Close Offensive Patrol (COP) over the allied front line near Cambrai. Pilot was 2nd Lt Agnew.

02Oct17 Departed Baizieux at 1430 hrs on 2nd combat mission, another COP over the allied front line near Saint-Quentin. The aircraft did not return and was last seen over Villers-Outréaux chasing an enemy two seater. The aircraft and pilot 2nd Lt I.C.F Agnew were posted as MIA.

00Oct17 Some days later a German aircraft dropped a note at Baizieux saying that Lt Agnew was uninjured and was a POW.

AFC Pilot Lieutenant Ivo Cumberland Fraser Agnew was Captured at Le Cateau and interned at the Offizierlager POW camp in the grounds of the Karlsruher Schloss, Karlsruhe Germany. Repatriated to Kingston-Upon-Hull, Yorkshire UK on 29 November 1918.

A9275

00Jul17 Built as Serial A9275 the 113th of 200 De Havilland designed DH5 Scout aircraft built in the Serial Range A9163 to A9362 by the Aircraft Manufacturing Company (Airco) in their UK factory at Hendon, London UK. Built to Contract 87/A/1286 dated 13th January 1917. Fitted with an 110hp (82kW), 9-cylinder Le Rhône 9J Rotary Engine No.WD9299.

00Aug17 Taken on charge by the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) for acceptance checks at No.2 Air Acceptance Park at Hendon, London UK.

00Sep17 Received for us by No.68 (Australian) Sqn at RFC Station Harlaxton near Grantham, Lincolnshire UK.

12Sep17 B Flight Commander CPT Stan Muir was flying a handling display over the airfield. In one manoeuvre he was flying inverted at very high speed when the wings folded and the aircraft crashed killing Muir instantly.

AFC Pilot Captain Stanley Keith Muir MC (25) single of Melbourne VIC is buried in the Northern Chancellery of the Harlaxton Cemetery, Lincolnshire UK.

A9277

This machine, named ‘Shanghai Race Club No.4”, was Gift Aircraft No.4 from China. On 24 May 1917 the £2,700 raised by the Race Club to purchase this aircraft were presented to the UK Government.

00Jul17 Built as Serial A9277 the 115th of 200 De Havilland designed DH5 Scout aircraft built in the Serial Range A9163 to A9362 by the Aircraft Manufacturing Company (Airco) in their UK factory at Hendon, London UK. Built to Contract 87/A/1286 dated 13th January 1917. Fitted with an 110hp (82kW), 9-cylinder Le Rhône 9J Rotary Engine No.101038.

00Aug17 Taken on charge by the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) for acceptance checks at No.2 Air Acceptance Park at Hendon, London UK.

27Aug17 Allocated to the Allied Expeditionary Force.

06Sep17 Ferried by an RFC pilot from 2AAP to No.1 Aircraft Servicing Depot (1ASD) at St Omer airfield, Pas-de-Calais France.

14Sep17 Ferried to No.2 Aircraft Servicing Depot (2ASD) at Fienvillers, 22km NNW of Amiens, France.

00Sep17 Allocated to No.68 (Australian) Sqn at Baizieux aerodrome, 24km NE of Amiens France.

03Oct17 Ferried on a 15 min flight from 2ASD to 68 Sqn by 2nd Lt S.W Ayers.

04Oct17 Taken on charge and issued to C Flight. Assigned to Lt Doug Morrison.

07Oct17 Flown by Lt Morrison on two test flights in preparation for combat.

13Oct77 Departed Baizieux airfield at 0840 hrs as one of four C Flight machines on a Close Offensive Patrol over the front lines in the Cambrai region. The aircraft failed to return and Lt Morrison was posted as MIA. The following day the squadron learned that Morrison had been shot down by four Albatros Scouts near Quéant and crashed in No Man’s Land. Note: In a show of pique, German artillery hammered the downed aircraft (after Morrison had been rescued) until it was reduced to scrap.

Morrison was located by a patrol from the 13th London regiment, pulled from the wreckage with serious wounds and delivered to the 2/1st London Field Ambulance Unit. He was then immediately transferred to the 3rd Australian Casualty Clearance Station at Grévillers, Picardie. Despite best efforts Lt Morrison died from his wounds on the 29th October 1917.

AFC Pilot Douglas George Morrison (22) single of East Malvern, Melbourne is buried in Grévillers British Cemetery, Grévillers in Picardie, France. He is also remembered at Location 187 in the Commemorative Area at the Australian War Memorial, Canberra ACT.

From 03Oct17 until its last flight with 68 Sqn on 13Oct17 the aircraft accumulated a total of 2 hrs 21 min flight time spread over 4 flights. Combat time was 1 hr 30 min from a single sortie.

A9324

00Sep17 Built as Serial A9324 the 162nd of 200 De Havilland designed DH5 Scout aircraft built in the Serial Range A9163 to A9362 by the Aircraft Manufacturing Company (Airco) in their UK factory at Hendon, London UK. Built to Contract 87/A/1286 dated 13th January 1917. Fitted with an 110hp (82kW), 9-cylinder Le Rhône 9J Rotary Engine No.101368

00Sep17 Taken on charge by the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) for acceptance checks at No.2 Air Acceptance Park at Hendon, London UK.

04Sep17 Allocated to the European Expeditionary Force and dispatched in crate to No.2 Aircraft Servicing Depot at Fienvillers, 34km NW of Amiens, France.

00Sep17 Allocated to No.68 (Australian) Sqn at Baizieux aerodrome, 24km NE of Amiens.

01Oct17 Departed Baizieux at 0700 hrs and at 0800 hrs a tappet rod sheared causing a complete engine failure. 2nd Lt F.G Huxley made a crash landing near Honnecourt and the machine sustained extensive damage to main struts; undercarriage buckled and twisted; airscrew broken; engine damaged; cowl cracked; and, fwd fuselage warped.

02Oct17 Aircraft transported to 2ASD for repairs.

18Nov17 Repairs completed, awaiting allocation.

00Nov17 Allocated to No.68 (Australian) Sqn at Baizieux

01Dec17 Ferried on a 15 min flight from 2ASD to Baizieux by 2nd Lt Truscott. Received for use by 68 Sqn.

11Dec17 Departed Baizieux aerodrome for an Engine Test Flight at 1420 hrs. At approximately 1425 hrs the pilot made a flat turn at 500ft whereupon the machine stalled and nosedived into the ground killing the pilot instantly. The machine was also destroyed by the crash and ensuing fire.

AFC Pilot 2nd Lt Harold Gordon Cornell (26) married of Ballarat, VIC is buried in Section III Grave J.5 of the Dernancourt Communal Cemetery Extension, Dernancourt, Picardie, France. He is also remembered at Location 187 in the Commemorative Area at the Australian War Memorial, Canberra ACT.

A9378

00Mar17 Built as Serial A9378 the 16th of 200 De Havilland designed DH5 Scout aircraft built in the Serial Range A9363 to A9562 by the Darracq Motor Engineering Co Ltd in their UK factory at Fulham, London UK. Built to Contract 87/A/1358 dated 13th January 1917. Fitted with an 110hp (82kW), 9-cylinder Le Rhône 9J Rotary Engine No.100502

00Apr17 Taken on charge by the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) for acceptance checks at No.2 Air Acceptance Park at Hendon, London UK.

00May17 Allocated to the European Expeditionary Force.

26May17 Flown from Hendon by an RFC Ferry Pilot to No.1 Aircraft Servicing Depot (1ASD) at St Omer airfield, Pas-de-Calais France.

00Jul17 Allocated for use to No.41 Sqn RFC at Léalvillers airfield 28km NNE of Amiens, France.

12Jul17 Received for use by 41 Sqn.

02Sep17 While on a Close Offensive Patrol a rocker arm broke off and tore a hole in the engine cowling and caused a complete engine failure. Pilot 2nd Lt A.A Shaw force landed near Léalvillers.

03Sep17 Aircraft transported to 2ASD at Fienvillers, 22km NNE of Amiens for assessment and repair.

31Oct17 Repairs completed. Le Rhône Engine No.100502 replaced by Engine No.T6485J

00Nov17 Allocated for use to No.68 (Australian) Sqn at Baizieux aerodrome, 24km NE of Amiens.

18Nov17 Lt Harry Taylor departed 2ASD at 1045 hrs for the 15 min ferry flight. Received for use by 68 Sqn.

19Nov17 Taken on strength and issued to B Flight, assigned to 2nd Lt Harry Taylor. The aircraft was painted with a single white band immediately forward of the tail assembly as a squadron identifier and the Numeral 5 painted in white on each side of the fuselage signifying a B Flight machine.

00Nov18 Aircraft was fitted with bomb racks that could carry four x 25lb HE Cooper Bombs in preparation for ground attack missions in the upcoming British offensive – the Battle of Cambrai.

20Nov17 1st Combat Mission. Lt Harry Taylor departed Baizieux at 0820 hrs accompanied by five other B Flight machines led by CPT Wilson on a Special Mission flight to provide close air support to Allied ground forces on the opening day of the Battle of Cambrai. After dropping their bombs on the Hindenburg Line the aircraft divided into pairs and proceeded to strafe troops, trenches, artillery batteries and other targets of opportunity.

After strafing an enemy strong point LT Taylor was forced to crash land behind German lines when his machine was seriously damaged by ground fire. Taylor then scavenged a German rifle and engaged enemy troops until he was found by a British patrol collecting the wounded. On the way back to allied lines he came across Captain J. Bell’s damaged machine and tried unsuccessfully to get it started. He eventually made it back to an Advanced Landing Ground and then back to Baizieux.

00Nov17 Aircraft SOC.

From 18Nov17 until its last flight with 68 Sqn on 20Nov17 the aircraft accumulated a total of 1 hr 50 min flight time spread over 3 flights. Combat time was 0 hrs 55 min on its one and only combat mission. Lt Harry Taylor was the pilot for all flights.

A9395

This machine, named ‘The Womens Battleplane”, was Gift Aircraft No.15 from Australia and No.14 from the Women of New South Wales and others. On 12 April 1917 the £2,700 raised by the Women of NSW to purchase this aircraft were presented to the manufacturer in the UK by an Australian Government representative.

00Mar17 Built as Serial A9395 the 33rd of 200 De Havilland designed DH5 Scout aircraft built in the Serial Range A9363 to A9562 by the Darracq Motor Engineering Co Ltd in their UK factory at Fulham, London UK. Built to Contract 87/A/1358 dated 13th January 1917. Fitted with an 110hp (82kW), 9-cylinder Le Rhône 9J Rotary Engine No.35568/WD9217

00Apr17 Taken on charge by the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) for acceptance checks at No.2 Air Acceptance Park at Hendon, London UK.

00Jul17 Allocated to No.68 (Australian) Sqn at RFC Station Harlaxton near Grantham, Lincolnshire UK.

22Jul17 Received for use by 68 Sqn. This aircraft did not deploy to France with the Squadron in September 1917 and at some stage prior to deployment it was returned to a RFC Air Acceptance Park for reallocation.

00Oct17 Received for use by No.63 Training Squadron at RFC Station Ternhill, Shropshire.

08Nov17 RFC pilot 2nd Lt W.G Redman went to RFC Station Harling Road, Norfolk to pick up the aircraft and deliver it to No.63 Training Squadron. After take-off the engine began choking and the pilot turned downwind attempting to land, inevitably the aircraft stalled and crashed destroying the machine and killing 2nd Lt Redman.


A9395 at Harlaxton airfield Jul7 1917

A9399

00Apr17 Built as Serial A9399 the 37th of 200 De Havilland designed DH5 Scout aircraft built in the Serial Range A9363 to A9562 by the Darracq Motor Engineering Co Ltd in their UK factory at Fulham, London UK. Built to Contract 87/A/1358 dated 13th January 1917. Fitted with an 110hp (82kW), 9-cylinder Le Rhône 9J Rotary Engine No.35613

00May17 Taken on charge by the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) for acceptance checks at No.2 Air Acceptance Park at Hendon, London UK.

00Jun17 Allocated to the European Expeditionary Force.

22Jun17 Flown from Hendon by an RFC Ferry Pilot to No.1 Aircraft Servicing Depot (1ASD) at St Omer airfield, Pas-de-Calais France.

24Jun17 Received for use by No.32 (F) Sqn RFC.

27Jul17 When landing after a Close Offensive Patrol the pilot misjudged his approach and crashed into a hangar beside the airfield. The aircraft sustained extensive damage that was not repairable at the Unit. RFC pilot Lt W.R.G Pearson received minor injuries and bruising.

28Jul17 Transported for repair to 1ASD

00Sep17 Held on charge at 1ASD following completion of repairs. Le Rhône Engine No.35613 was replaced by Engine No.T8390JB as part of the repair process.

15Sep17 Flown from 1ASD to 2ASD at Fienvillers, 22km NNW of Amiens, France for squadron allocation.

00Sep17 Allocated for use to No.68 (Australian) Sqn at Baizieux aerodrome, 24km NE of Amiens.

03Oct17 Lt C.L Johnson departed 2ASD at 1545 hrs for the 15 min ferry flight. Received for use by 68 Sqn.

04Oct17 Taken on strength and issued to A Flight, assigned to Lt Clive Leicester Johnson. The aircraft was painted with a single white band immediately forward of the tail assembly as a squadron identifier and the Letter F painted in white on each side of the fuselage signifying an A Flight machine.

05Oct17 Departed Baizieux at 1720 hrs for 1st combat mission flown by Lt C.L Johnson on a one hour Close Offensive Patrol (COP) over the front lines near Arras. Several enemy aircraft were seen but none could be brought to action.

16Oct17 One of four A flight machines that departed Baizieux at 1020 hrs for a COP in the Gouy area. At approximately 1100 hrs the flight was attacked by 7 or 8 Albatross Scouts. The enemy were seen before they dived on the Flight thus losing the element of surprise and an inconclusive melee ensued before both sides withdrew. Pilot was Lt L.N Ward.

00Nov18 Aircraft was fitted with bomb racks that could carry four x 25lb HE Cooper Bombs in preparation for ground attack missions in the upcoming British offensive – the Battle of Cambrai.

12Nov17 Lt L.N Ward departed Baizieux at 1020 hrs for a COP but was forced to return to base after only 10 minutes because of a severely vibrating engine.

20Nov17 Lt L.N Ward departed Baizieux at 0835 hrs accompanied by five other A Flight machines led by CPT Phillipps on a Special Mission flight to provide close air support to Allied ground forces on the opening day of the Battle of Cambrai. After dropping their bombs on the Hindenburg Line the aircraft divided into pairs and proceeded to strafe troops, trenches, artillery batteries and other targets of opportunity. Lt Ward was strafing German troops near Marcoing to the SW of Cambrai when the aircraft was shot down behind enemy lines by ground based heavy machine guns. Lt Ward managed to swing his machine before it crashed and he saw the engine being forced past him as he was ejected, seat and all, through the cockpit coaming.

Lt Ward sustained a broken leg and various other injuries in the crash and was treated for his wounds at a German casualty clearing station before being bundled off to a POW camp for the remainder of the war. As an interesting aside, Allied authorities were unaware of Ward’s situation until Ward’s sister received a letter from him through the Red Cross telling her of his escapades.

From 03Oct17 until its last flight with 68 Sqn on 20Nov17 the aircraft accumulated a total of 48 hrs 40 min flight time spread over 38 flights. Combat time was 43 hrs 15 min amassed over 11 flights.

A9428

00May17 Built as Serial A9428 the 66th of 200 De Havilland designed DH5 Scout aircraft built in the Serial Range A9363 to A9562 by the Darracq Motor Engineering Co Ltd in their UK factory at Fulham, London UK. Built to Contract 87/A/1358 dated 13th January 1917. Fitted with an 110hp (82kW), 9-cylinder Le Rhône 9J Rotary Engine No.101050

00Jun17 Taken on charge by the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) for acceptance checks at No.2 Air Acceptance Park at Hendon, London UK.

00Jul17 Allocated to the European Expeditionary Force.

26Jul17 Flown from Hendon by an RFC Ferry Pilot to No.1 Aircraft Servicing Depot (1ASD) at St Omer airfield, Pas-de-Calais France.

00Jul17 Allocated for use to No.32 Sqn RFC.

08Aug17 Received for use by 32 Sqn.

13Aug17 Sustained extensive damage when forced to crash land after the magneto arm burnt out on a low flying ground patrol. Pilot CPT D. Joy was uninjured.

15Aug17 Aircraft recovered to 1ASD for assessment.

18Aug17 Transported for reconstruction to No.2 Aircraft Servicing Depot at Fienvillers, 34km NW of Amiens.

15Oct17 Held on charge by 2ASD awaiting allocation after reconstruction completed. During this period cylinder Le Rhône Engine No.101050 was replaced by Engine No.T6250.

00Oct17 Allocated for use to No.68 (Australian) Sqn at Baizieux aerodrome, 24km NE of Amiens.

24Oct17 2nd Lt S.W. Ayers departed 2ASD at 0945 hrs for the 15 min ferry flight. Received for use by 68 Sqn.

25Oct17 Taken on strength and issued to C Flight, assigned to Lt Albert Griggs. The aircraft was painted with a single white band immediately forward of the tail assembly as a squadron identifier and the Letter U painted in white on each side of the fuselage signifying a C Flight machine.

29Oct17 Departed Baizieux at 0955 hrs for 1st combat mission flown by Lt Albert Griggs on an uneventful one hour twenty minute Close Offensive Patrol (COP) over the front lines near Arras.

31Oct17 Shortly after departing Baizieux at 1010 hrs for a COP near Arras the engine began failing and Lt Griggs was forced to abort and RTB.

00Nov18 Aircraft was fitted with bomb racks that could carry four x 25lb HE Cooper Bombs in preparation for ground attack missions in the upcoming British offensive – the Battle of Cambrai.

08Nov17 Lt Frederick Hurtle Sheppard departed Baizieux at 1440 hrs for a COP in the Cambrai region. On the homeward leg of the patrol the engine failed and Sheppard made a forced landing at Léalvillers airfield 28km NNE of Amiens.

20Nov17 Lt A. Griggs departed Baizieux at 0705 hrs accompanied by five other C Flight machines led by CPT J. Bell on a Special Mission flight to provide close air support to Allied ground forces on the opening day of the Battle of Cambrai. After dropping their bombs on the Hindenburg Line the aircraft divided into pairs and proceeded to strafe troops, trenches, artillery batteries and other targets of opportunity.

22Nov17 Lt Griggs departed Baizieux at 1000 hrs accompanied by A9461 (Lt Huxley) on a Special Mission flight to provide close air support for Allied ground forces during the Battle of Cambrai. After dropping bombs and strafing an enemy position near Fontaine Griggs was forced to land at the Advanced Landing Ground near Bapaume when his engine lost power.

23Nov17 One of four C Flight machines that departed Baizieux at 1325 hrs on a Special Mission flight to provide close air support for Allied ground forces in the Bourlon Woods area. Lt Griggs made repeated attacks against a German strong point that was holding up the 10th Royal Irish Rifles. CPT Wilson (A9449) saw Griggs being attacked by an enemy scout but successfully driving him away before resuming his attacks against the strongpoint. Unfortunately, Griggs was shot down and killed by heavy ground fire.

AFC pilot Lieutenant Albert Griggs (30) single of Hobart TAS has no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Flying Services Memorial, Arras in the Nord Pas de Calais, France. He is also remembered at Location 187 in the Commemorative Area at the Australian War Memorial, Canberra ACT.

Griggs’ actions were witnessed by many people which resulted in the following In Memorial column appearing in The Times in 1918:

To an UNKNOWN AIRMAN, shot down 23rd November 1917, whilst attacking a German

strong-point south-west of Bourlon Wood, in an effort to help out a Company of the Royal

Irish Rifles, when other help had failed

From 27Oct17 until its last flight with 68 Sqn on 23Nov17 the aircraft accumulated a total of 21 hrs 10 min flight time spread over 27 flights. Combat time was 16 hrs 35 min amassed over 13 flights.

A9432

This machine, named ‘The Upper Hunter Battleplane”, was Gift Aircraft No.16 from Australia and No.15 from New South Wales. The £2,700 raised by the Upper Hunter District residents to purchase this aircraft were presented to the manufacturer in the UK by an Australian Government representative.

00May17 Built as Serial A9432 the 70th of 200 De Havilland designed DH5 Scout aircraft built in the Serial Range A9363 to A9562 by the Darracq Motor Engineering Co Ltd in their UK factory at Fulham, London UK. Built to Contract 87/A/1358 dated 13th January 1917. Fitted with an 110hp (82kW), 9-cylinder Le Rhône 9J Rotary Engine No.4691WD9082

00Jun17 Taken on charge by the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) for acceptance checks at No.2 Air Acceptance Park at Hendon, London UK.

00Jul17 Allocated to No.68 (Australian) Sqn at RFC Station Harlaxton near Grantham, Lincolnshire UK.

22Jul17 Received for use by 68 Sqn.

27Aug17 Engine failure resulted in a forced landing at Harlaxton, Aircraft was extensively damaged and pilot 2nd Lt Alan Fearon Weaver sustained serious injuries. Lt Weaver was admitted to Bella Park Military Hospital then transferred to the 3rd London General Military Hospital. In December 1917 he was again transferred to the 6th Australian Hospital before being repatriated back to Australia in January 1918 aboard HMAT Corinthic. He was invalided out of Service on 4Sep18 at 2MD HQ.

00Aug17 Aircraft struck off charge and [probably] converted to spares.

A9432 on delivery to No.68 (Australian) Sqn at RFC Station Harlaxton, July 1917

A9457

00Jun17 Built as Serial A9457 the 95th of 200 De Havilland designed DH5 Scout aircraft built in the Serial Range A9363 to A9562 by the Darracq Motor Engineering Co Ltd in their UK factory at Fulham, London UK. Built to Contract 87/A/1358 dated 13th January 1917. Fitted with an 110hp (82kW), 9-cylinder Le Rhône 9J Rotary Engine No.35663.

09Jul17 Taken on charge by the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) for acceptance checks at No.2 Air Acceptance Park at Hendon, London UK.

00Aug17 Allocated to No.68 (Australian) Sqn at RFC Station Harlaxton near Grantham, Lincolnshire UK.

22Aug17 Received for use by 68 Sqn.

21Sep17 One of 15 DH5 aircraft that departed RFC Harlaxton at 0930hrs for a ferry flight to France where the Squadron was relocated to be part of 13th Wing RFC. After a refuelling stop at RFC Station Lympne, Kent all the aircraft arrive safely at St Omer aerodrome France by 1700hrs. Pilot was Lt G.C Matthews.

22Sep17 The 15 aircraft flew from St Omer to Warloy (27km NE of Amiens), remained overnight.

23Sep17 The 15 aircraft flew from Warloy to the new operating base at Baizieux aerodrome (24km NE of Amiens).

25Sep17 Aircraft allocated to C Flight and assigned to Lt G.C Matthews

28Sep17 On this day and the next three days the aircraft was flown by Lt Matthews on several test flights to ensure the aircraft was ready for combat.

29Sep17 The aircraft was painted with a single white band immediately forward of the tail assembly as a squadron identifier. Also, the Letter X was painted in white on each side of the fuselage signifying a C Flight machine.

01Oct17 Departed Baizieux at 1345 hrs for 1st combat mission flown by Lt G.C Matthews as one of three C Flight machines on a Close Offensive Patrol (COP) over the front lines near Villiers. An enemy Scout was seen and chased but could not be caught.

02Oct17 Departed Baizieux at 1520 hrs flown by Lt G.C Matthews as one of three C Flight machines on a Close Offensive Patrol (COP) over the front lines near Villiers. At approximately 1645 hrs Matthews was forced to land at Montaban with engine problems. Engine was temporarily repaired and the machine returned to Baizieux the following day.

07Oct17 Departed Baizieux at 1755 hrs flown by Lt G.C Matthews as one of four C Flight machines on a COP over the front lines near Villiers. Soon after take-off the gun would not fire when tested so the aircraft returned to Base where the problem was quickly rectified and Matthews resumed the mission.

08Oct17 Lt Matthews departed at 1000 hrs for a gun test flight. The interrupter gear failed and the airscrew was holed when the gun was tested.

16Oct17 Departed Baizieux at 1755 hrs flown by Lt G.C Matthews as one of four C Flight machines on a COP over the front lines near Villiers. Soon after take-off the gun would not fire when tested so the aircraft returned to Base. Over the next five days the aircraft was test flown on six occasions before the gun system would operate as required.

21Oct17 Lt Matthews departed Baizieux at 1355 hrs as one of four C Flight machines for a combined Offensive Patrol/Escort Mission near Cambrai. At 1420hrs over Brobieres he noticed an enemy scout attacking an RAF RE8s and dived to attack. He fired a burst of 50 rounds into the enemy from close range, causing the enemy to dive away to the east.

01Nov17 Departed Baizieux at 1205 hrs flown by CPT J. Bell accompanied by Lt McKenzie (B377) on a COP over the front lines near Arras. At approximately 1235hrs the engine began to lose power and Bell force landed at Étrun airfield, 15km West of Arras. Engine was temporarily repaired by 13 Sqn RFC personnel and the machine returned to Baizieux on 03Nov17.

06Nov17 CPT J. Bell flew as successful 5min engine test flight.

00Nov18 Aircraft was fitted with bomb racks that could carry four x 25lb HE Cooper Bombs in preparation for ground attack missions in the upcoming British offensive – the Battle of Cambrai.

17Nov17 Departed Baizieux at 0740 hrs flown by 2nd Lt F.H Sheppard accompanied by Lt McKenzie (B377) on a COP over the front lines near Mervelle. At approximately 0830 hrs Sheppard force landed at Mervelle airfield with engine problems. RTB later the same day.

20Nov17 Lt F.H Sheppard departed Baizieux at 0705 hrs accompanied by five other C Flight machines led by CPT J. Bell on a Special Mission flight to provide close air support to Allied ground forces on the opening day of the Battle of Cambrai. After dropping their bombs on the Hindenburg Line the aircraft divided into pairs and proceeded to strafe troops, trenches, artillery batteries and other targets of opportunity. Sheppard then flew to the ALG at Bapaume for a quick replenishment before launching for another sortie at 1200hrs.

At 1220 hrs the aircraft was shot down and Sheppard received gunshot wounds to the head and chest; a broken foot, contusions and shock. Sheppard was rescued by a British Army patrol and taken to the 21st Casualty Clearance Station. He was then evacuated back to the UK and when recovered from his wounds he was repatriated back to Australia via the SS Justicia on 13 June 1918 to New York and then on the SS Makura from Vancouver to Sydney.

From 21Sep17 until its last flight with 68 Sqn on 20Nov17 the aircraft accumulated a total of 37 hrs 12 min flight time spread over 45 flights. Combat time was 25 hrs 45 min amassed over 22 flights. Pilot for the majority of those flights was Lt G.C Matthews.

A9467

00Aug17 Built as Serial A9467 the 105th of 200 De Havilland designed DH5 Scout aircraft built in the Serial Range A9363 to A9562 by the Darracq Motor Engineering Co Ltd in their UK factory at Fulham, London. Built to Contract 87/A/1358 dated 13th January 1917. Fitted with an 110hp (82kW), 9-cylinder Le Rhône 9J Rotary Engine No.100980/WD10395.

00Aug17 Taken on charge by the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) for acceptance checks at No.2 Air Acceptance Park at Hendon, London UK.

09Sep17 Received for use by No.30 (Australian Training) Squadron at RFC Station Ternhill, Shropshire.

23Oct17 Pilot closed the engine and then tried to turn and land but lost control and crashed at the end of the airfield. Court of Inquiry held to determine death of 2nd Lt Sydney Harold Smith RFC on 25th Oct17

RFC Pilot 2nd Lt Sydney Harold Smith (21) was buried in Grave I.4.134 at Stoke-upon-Tern (St Peter) Church Cemetery, Shropshire with full MH.

26Oct17 Aircraft struck off charge and converted to spares.

Wreckage of A9467 at Tern Hill 23Oct17.

A9473

00Jul17 Built as Serial A9473 the 111th of 200 De Havilland designed DH5 Scout aircraft built in the Serial Range A9363 to A9562 by the Darracq Motor Engineering Co Ltd in their UK factory at Fulham, London UK. Built to Contract 87/A/1358 dated 13th January 1917. Fitted with an 110hp (82kW), 9-cylinder Le Rhône 9J Rotary Engine No.35610.

00Jul17 Taken on charge by the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) for acceptance checks at No.2 Air Acceptance Park at Hendon, London UK.

11Aug17 Allocated to the Allied Expeditionary Force. Allocation cancelled.

00Aug17 Allocated to No.68 (Australian) Sqn at RFC Station Harlaxton near Grantham, Lincolnshire UK.

22Aug17 Received for use by 68 Sqn.

21Sep17 One of 15 DH5 aircraft that departed RFC Harlaxton at 0930 hrs for a ferry flight to France where the Squadron was relocated to be part of 13th Wing RFC. After a refuelling stop at RFC Station Lympne, Kent all the aircraft arrive safely at St Omer aerodrome France by 1700hrs. Pilot was CPT John Bell.

22Sep17 The 15 aircraft flew from St Omer to Warloy (27km NE of Amiens), remained overnight.

23Sep17 The 15 aircraft flew from Warloy to the new operating base at Baizieux aerodrome (24km NE of Amiens).

25Sep17 Aircraft allocated to C Flight and assigned to CPT John Bell.

29Sep17 On this day and the next the aircraft was flown by CPT J Bell on several test flights to ensure the aircraft was ready for combat.

30Sept17 The aircraft was painted with a single white band immediately forward of the tail assembly as a squadron identifier. Also, the Letter V was painted in white on each side of the fuselage signifying a C Flight machine.

02Oct17 Departed Baizieux at 1000 hrs for 1st combat mission flown by CPT J. Bell as one of four C Flight machines on a Close Offensive Patrol (COP) over the front lines in the Cambrai sector.

18Oct17 Departed Baizieux at 3110 hrs flown by 2nd Lt Albert Griggs as one of four C Flight machines on a Close Offensive Patrol (COP) over the front lines in the Cambrai sector. On the homeward journey the magneto failed at 1425 hrs causing Lt Griggs to force land in a field.

19Oct17 A ground crew travelled to the downed aircraft and changed the magneto. Lt Griggs RTB at 1000 hrs.

31Oct17 Departed Baizieux at 1310 hrs flown by CPT J. Bell as one of two C Flight machines on a Close Offensive Patrol (COP) over the front lines in the Cambrai sector. Five minutes after departure CPT Bell aborted and RTB with a dud engine.

00Nov18 Aircraft was fitted with bomb racks that could carry four x 25lb HE Cooper Bombs in preparation for ground attack missions in the upcoming British offensive – the Battle of Cambrai.

20Nov17 CPT J. Bell departed Baizieux at 0705 hrs leading five other C Flight machines on a Special Mission flight to provide close air support to Allied ground forces on the opening day of the Battle of Cambrai. After dropping their bombs on the Hindenburg Line the aircraft divided into pairs and proceeded to strafe troops, trenches, artillery batteries and other targets of opportunity.

When flying low over the front lines CPT Bell was shot in the chest by ground fire and force landed in no man’s land. CPT Bell was pulled from the wreckage by a British Army patrol with serious head and chest wounds and was taken to the 56th Casualty Clearing Station. Unfortunately, CPT Bell succumbed to his wounds on 27Dec17.

AFC pilot Captain John Bell (31) single of Rokewood VIC is buried in Section IV Grave No C.8 of the Tincourt New British Cemetery, Tincourt in Picardie, France. He is also remembered at Location 187 in the Commemorative Area at the Australian War Memorial, Canberra ACT.

22Nov17 Wreckage was recovered and taken to 2ASD.

30Nov17 Aircraft assessed as Not Worthy of Repair. Struck off charge and converted to spares.

From 21Sept17 until its last flight with 68Sqn on 20Nov17 the aircraft accumulated a total of 32 hrs 10 min flight time spread over 57 flights. Combat time was 15 hrs 10 min amassed over 16 missions.

A9477

00Jul17 Built as Serial A9477 the 115th of 200 De Havilland designed DH5 Scout aircraft built in the Serial Range A9363 to A9562 by the Darracq Motor Engineering Co Ltd in their UK factory at Fulham, London UK. Built to Contract 87/A/1358 dated 13th January 1917. Fitted with an 110hp (82kW), 9-cylinder Le Rhône 9J Rotary Engine No.101305.

00Jul17 Taken on charge by the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) for acceptance checks at No.2 Air Acceptance Park at Hendon, London UK.

00Aug17 Allocated to the European Expeditionary Force (EF).

14Sep17 Flown from Hendon by an RFC Ferry Pilot to No.1 Aircraft Servicing Depot (1ASD) at St Omer airfield, Pas-de-Calais France.

20Sep17 Flown from 1ASD to 2ASD at Fienvillers, 22km NNW of Amiens, France for squadron allocation.

00Oct17 Allocated for use to No.68 (Australian) Sqn at Baizieux aerodrome, 24km NE of Amiens.

17Oct17 2nd Lt R.W Howard departed 2ASD at 1520 hrs for the 15 min ferry flight.

00Oct17 Aircraft issued to A Flight and assigned to 2nd Lt J.R Bartlam. The aircraft was painted with a single white band immediately forward of the tail assembly as a squadron identifier. Also, the Letter B was painted in white on each side of the fuselage signifying an A Flight machine.

19Oct17 Departed Baizieux at 1050 hrs for 1st combat mission flown by 2nd Lt Bartlam as one of four A Flight machines on an uneventful Close Offensive Patrol (COP) over the front lines in the Cambrai sector.

21Oct17 Departed Baizieux at 1110 hrs flown by 2nd Lt Bartlam as one of four A Flight machines on a COP over the front lines in the Cambrai sector. At 1115 hrs Bartlam was forced to abort and RTB with a vibrating engine.

24Oct17 Departed Baizieux at 1040 hrs flown by 2nd Lt Bartlam as one of four A Flight machines on a COP over the front lines in the Cambrai sector. At 1105 hrs Bartlam was forced to abort and RTB with a vibrating engine.

30Oct17 Departed Baizieux at 1040 hrs flown by 2nd Lt Bartlam as one of four A Flight machines on a COP over the front lines in the Cambrai sector. At 1115 hrs Bartlam was forced to abort and force land at Vitry with a severely vibrating engine. Engine temporarily repaired and RTB the following day.

01Novt17 Le Rhône Engine No.101305 replaced by Engine No.35662.

00Nov18 Aircraft was fitted with bomb racks that could carry four x 25lb HE Cooper Bombs in preparation for ground attack missions in the upcoming British offensive – the Battle of Cambrai.

20Nov17 Lt D.G Clark departed Baizieux at 0835 hrs accompanied by five other A Flight machines led by CPT Phillipps on a Special Mission flight to provide close air support to Allied ground forces on the opening day of the Battle of Cambrai. After dropping their bombs on the Hindenburg Line the aircraft divided into pairs and proceeded to strafe troops, trenches, artillery batteries and other targets of opportunity.

22Nov17 Departed Baizieux at 0705 hrs flown by Lt D.G Clark as one of four machines on a Special Mission flight to provide close air support to Allied ground forces in the early phases of the Battle of Cambrai. Lt Clark was last seen heading east over the Bourlon Wood area and failed to return.

After the War it was learned that Lt Clark had been shot down approximately seven kilometres west of Cambrai by Leutnant D.R Matthaei of Jagdstaffel 5.

AFC pilot Lt David Goodlet Clark (26) single of Killara, Sydney NSW has no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Flying Services Memorial, Arras in Nord Pas de Calais, France. He is also remembered at Location 187 in the Commemorative Area at the Australian War Memorial, Canberra ACT.

From 17Oct17 until its last flight with 68 Sqn on 22Nov17 the aircraft accumulated a total of 17 hrs 35 min flight time spread over 25 flights. Combat time was 9 hrs 25 min amassed over seven missions.

A9532

00Oct17 Built as Serial A9532 the 170th of 200 De Havilland designed DH5 Scout aircraft built in the Serial Range A9363 to A9562 by the Darracq Motor Engineering Company in their UK factory at Fulham, London UK. Built to Contract 87/A/1358 dated 13th January 1917. Fitted with an 110hp (82kW), 9-cylinder Le Rhône 9J Rotary Engine No.35777.

30Oct17 Taken on charge by the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) for acceptance checks at No.2 Air Acceptance Park at Hendon, London UK.

07Nov17 Ferried by an RFC pilot from 2AAP to No.1 Aircraft Servicing Depot (1ASD) at St Omer airfield, Pas-de-Calais France.

18Nov17 Flown from 1ASD to 2ASD at Fienvillers, 22km NNW of Amiens, France for squadron allocation.

00Nov17 Allocated to No.68 (Australian) Sqn at Baizieux aerodrome, 24km NE of Amiens France.

23Nov17 2nd Lt H.G Cornell departed 2ASD at 0935 hrs for the 15 min ferry flight to Baizieux.

24Nov17 Taken on charge and issued to A Flight. Aircraft assigned to 2nd Lt H.G Cornell.

25Nov17 Over the following four days Lt Cornell flew several test and practice missions in preparation for combat.

30Nov17 Departed Baizieux on 1st combat mission at 0840 hrs with three other DH5s to attack enemy ground forces near Bourlon Wood. The aircraft was last seen heading west over Bourlon Woods but failed to return and Lt Cornell was reported MIA.

After attacking his target Lt Cornell became separated from his Flight and was attacked by enemy aircraft and shot down near the front lines. He then spent an adventurous 24 hrs in a heavily shelled area before managing to make his way back to Allied lines and being returned to the squadron.

Whilst with 68 Sqn the aircraft accumulated a total of 6 hrs 25 min flight time spread over 9 flights. Combat time was 1 hrs 05 min from a single flight.

SY 2020-01-27

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