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Paul McGuiness RAAF Archive
Paul McGuiness is an Australian aviation researcher and historian. Using primary sources he has assembled detailed information on the history of each plane
used by Australians and Australian forces in WWl and WW2, and on personnel involved.

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History of Australian Military Aviation

First World War

Armstrong Whitworth FK3

Avro 504

Bristol F2b Fighter

Fairey Aviation Model lllD Seaplane

Martinsyde G.100 G 102 Elephant

Maurice Farman S.11 Shorthorn

Royal Aircraft Factory BE2

Royal Aircraft Factory BE12

Royal Aircraft Factory RE.8

Royal Aircraft Factory SE5A Experimental Scout

Sopwith Camel B Series

Sopwith Camel C D E F Series

Sopwith Snipe

Sopwith Scout (Pup)

Sopwith 1½ Strutter

Supermarine Seagull lll

Supermarine Southampton Mk 1

Westland Wapiti


Post First World War

Bristol Bulldog

De Havilland DH.9A

Hawker Demon

Royal Aircraft Factory SE.5A

Avro 504K


Second World War

458 Sqd Wellingtons

460 Sqd Wellingtons

466 Sqd Wellingtons


Further Information:

Aces and Aviators WWl Database

Material Relating to Australia

Aircraft Types Used By Australian Forces 1921 - 1940

Supermarine Southampton Mk.I Seaplane

Used By: Apr28- Feb34 Coastal Reconnaissance Flight, RAAF Point Cook Feb34- Aug39 Seaplane Squadron, RAAF Point Cook

Aug39-Apr40 No.10 General Reconnaissance Squadron, RAAF Point Cook

A Brief History of the Supermarine Southampton in RAAF Service

Paul McGuiness

In the 1920s the Royal Air Force was often required to fly vast distances in order to maintain links with far flung British outposts and foster cooperation between Britain and her extended Empire. The RAAF Air Board had the Australian delegation to the 1926 London Imperial Conference request the RAF to extend one of these flights to include Australia and, in response, the RAF planned a 1927-28 deployment to the Far East and Australia using the new long ranged Supermarine Southampton flying boat. To show Australian commitment to the RAF plan the Australian government ordered two Supermarine Southampton Mk.1 aircraft in early 1927 and planned to have them cooperate with the RAF Flight upon its arrival in Australia and in future operations to strengthen Far East defence ties.

RAAF staff had expressed a desire to purchase the newer single skin metal hulled Mk.II Southamptons because they had a greater range than the original double wooden hull aircraft and they would be much easier to maintain. However, Supermarine Aviation advised they could not meet the RAAF timeline to manufacture new metal skinned aircraft for delivery to Australia in time for the RAF Far East Flight arrival in June 1928. The RAAF was therefore forced to purchase two of the original 12 wooden hulled aircraft from RAF stocks. Accordingly, two Supermarine Southamptons Serialed S1158 and S1159 were purchased and shipped to Australia in early 1928. The planned meeting between the RAF and RAAF Southamptons in 1928 never eventuated owing to the vagaries of chance and a liberal dose of bad luck. A11-1 was indeed prepositioned to greet the RAF Far East Flight at Adelaide SA on 22 June 1928 but a freak gust of wind on the Port River all but destroyed A11-1 just as it was about to leave for the much hyped rendezvous. The best the RAAF could muster to meet and greet the RAF contingent when they reached Sydney on their triumphant voyage were a DH9 and two DH9As from 3 Squadron at RAAF Richmond. To add insult to injury, one of the DH9A aircraft was forced to ditch in Sydney harbour after suffering engine failure. Press reports of the day were not very complimentary of the RAAF to say the least.

The Air Board quickly arranged for A11-2 to conduct a cruise of all Eastern State major cities, ostensibly to conduct interviews with prospective RAAF cadets but in reality to show the public the RAAF could operate large aircraft without mishap. The cruise, perhaps surprisingly, generated large amounts of very positive PR for the RAAF in particular and by default the Government of the day. As a result the Recruitment Cruises became a regular occurrence during 1929-33 period and one of the Southamptons made the cruise every six months or so. In service the Southamptons proved to be very popular with aircrew who enjoyed the creature comforts hereto unavailable in the normally Spartan equipped service aircraft of the era. The combination of a galley, sleeping area, stable flying platform and very long range for an aircraft of that time made for an aircraft that earned high praise from those who flew and maintained them. The Southamptons performed admirably in the aerial survey role and large swathes of Australia’s coasts and rivers were covered. Perhaps the most widely known survey mission was one conducted by A11-1 during a seven month deployment from Jun 1935 to Feb 1936, the details of which appear below. The aircraft were also well suited for the many SAR missions they called upon to perform in their long careers. A little known fact is their use as parachute training aircraft in the mid-to-late 1930s, where trainees would walk out onto a platform on the aircraft’s lower mainplane; face into the wind and pull the rip cord for the drogue chute to deploy which in turn extracted the main chute and quickly pulled the student off the wing. Many early serviceman from Australia and NZ made their first parachute drop in this manner.

Both Southamptons gave a decade of service which is a reflection of their usefulness in an age where aviation innovations came very quickly. The exact fate or either aircraft is not known and sadly neither machine survived: both passed with a whimper into the mists of antiquity with their passage now only reflected in old photographs and the written word.

A11-1

May1927 Constructed to a RAF Order by Supermarine Aviation Works at their Hazel Road factory in Woolston, Southampton UK as an Mk.1 Southampton, Serial S1158 with construction No.1246.

29Oct27 Purchased by the RAAF for 17,000 pounds sterling.

Nov27 Almost completely stripped and packed in one very large packing container and loaded aboard the 9,640 ton Australian Commonwealth Line Steamship SS Ferndale.

02Dec27 Departed UK for Australia.

19Jan28 Arrived at Fremantle, WA.

26Jan28 Arrived at Victoria Docks, Port Melbourne VIC.

01Feb28 Received at Point Cook.

20Apr28 Reserialed from S1158 to A11-1. Along with A11-2 allocated to form the Coastal Reconnaissance Flight at Point Cook.

Feb-May28 Assembled, tested and readied for flight by No 1 Flying Training School (1FTS) engineering staff.

04May28 First flight in Australia.

18May28 Official test and acceptance flight

May28 Planned for A11-1 and A11-2 to fly to South Australia in June to meet four Southamptons of the RAF Far East Flight and format with them for their arrival in Adelaide and later, Melbourne.

20Jun28 Departed 0800hrs on flight to Adelaide with WGCDR SJ Goble & FLGOFF F.A. Briggs. Arrived Adelaide 1345hrs and moored in the Port River near the Osborne Quarantine Station. Aircraft had been sent from Point Cook to meet up with four visiting Southampton’s of the RAF’s Far East Flight that arrived 160 kilometres down the coast from Adelaide.

22Jun28 The crew was just leaving the shore to prepare for take-off when a strong wind squall struck and overturned the moored aircraft. A radio mechanic already on board (CPL Douglas A Endean) was lucky to be rescued unhurt. The aircraft quickly sank nose first onto the river bed with the tail and port wing up in the air. The stbd wing was badly crumpled and the engines and propellers suffered considerable damage. Much to the chagrin of RAAF officials, instead of triumphantly joining the British boats in a public display of Empire, A11-1 had to be ignominiously retrieved off the river bottom by crane and returned to Point Cook on board the 2,040 ton Howard Smith Line SS Saros for a lengthy and costly repair.

Aug28 Commenced repair at Point Cook. New wings were obtained from the UK and fitted. Cost of the repair was estimated at 2,500 pounds and took six months to complete.

18Apr30 Departed Point Cook for Strahan, TAS to conduct a one week aerial survey of selected areas between Macquarie Harbour and Port Davey on the south west coast of Tasmania and, areas within the Gordon River Valley. Crew was WGCDR RS Brown; SQNLDR AE Hempel; FLGOFF EV Lachal; CPL Kearley; LAC R. Souter; LAC Sims + three Tasmanian Forestry officials.

27Jun33 Conducted a six day search for the missing collier MV Christina Fraser in Bass Strait.

14Feb34 Coastal Reconnaissance Flight at Point Cook disbanded.

15Feb34 Allocated to and received by the newly raised Seaplane Squadron at Point Cook.

20Aug34 Naval Fleet exercise with HMAS Canberra near King Island, Bass Strait.

08Oct34 Together with A11-2 departed Pt Cook at 1340hrs to rendezvous with four RAF Rangoon flying boats over Frankston. The formation then flew over Melbourne shores where a State reception was held for the RAF aircraft.

18Oct34 Together with A11-2 departed Pt Cook at 0500hrs to rendezvous with HMS Sussex at 0525hrs. Escorted the Sussex, which was carrying HRH Prince Henry on his State visit to Australia, to Port Melbourne where a State reception was held.

20Oct34 Departed at 0445hrs to perform an 11-hour SAR for missing airliner DH.86 ‘Miss Hobart’ which was lost the previous day on a scheduled flight between Melbourne and Launceston. A smear of oil was noticed west of Citadel Island off Wilsons Promontory.

21Oct34 Resumed search for missing airliner. At 0900hrs approximately six miles SW of Citadel Island wreckage was seen spread over one square mile of ocean. The wreckage was presumed to be from the ill-fated DH.86, no further trace of the aircraft, the two crewmen or the nine passengers was ever found.

10Nov34 Part of the RAAF Flying Tribute over RAAF Laverton in connection with the visit of HRH The Duke of Gloucester.

19Nov34 Part of the RAAF Flying Tribute over RAAF Richmond in connection with the visit of HRH The Duke of Gloucester.

27Nov34 Conducted an aerial photographic survey on route Farm Cove-Tuggerah Lakes-Newcastle Harbour-Port Stephens-Lake Macquarie then back to Farm Cove.

29Nov34 Departed Sydney for Pt Cook via Batemans Bay-Eden and Metung. Arrived Metung where heavy gales delayed departure until 1030hrs 03Dec34.

03Dec34 Arrived Pt Cook 1400hrs to end the support of HRH visit to Australia.

06May35 Along with A11-2 led a 29 aircraft fly-past to commemorate the Kings Silver Jubilee Parade in Melbourne.

26Jun35 Departed 0730hrs with a crew of SQNLDR Arthur Ernest Hempel; PLTOFF Lance Edmond Burt; A504 CPL Percy Neale rigger; and LAC A752 John Anthony O’Donnell fitter and LAC A1327 Alexander Magnus Joseph Clark W/T operator on Stage I of the ‘Round Australia Survey Flight’. The main aims of the flight were: to survey the Sydney-Darwin sector of the planned UK-Australia British Empire Air Mail route; and, to survey selected rivers, bays and inlets around the coast for likely seaplane mooring bases and emergency landing sites. Stbd engine began emitting thick black smoke two hours into the flight so a landing was made at Mallacoota to repair the engine.

27Jun35 Departed Mallacoota 1220hrs. Landed at Farm Cove, Sydney 1550hrs. Spent two days surveying several areas around Sydney for possible seaplane sites.

30Jun35 Depart Sydney for Brisbane. Forced to land at Maclean, NSW because of torrential rain.

01Jul35 Depart Maclean for Brisbane 0900hrs. Arrive Brisbane 1130hrs. Spent two days surveying several areas around Brisbane for possible seaplane sites.

03Jul35 Depart Brisbane 0915. Arrived Gladstone at 1310hrs.

04Jul35 Depart Gladstone 1110hrs. Arrived Rockhampton1330hrs.

05Jul35 When taking off the tailplane structure was damaged which required immediate repair.

06Jul35 Depart Rockhampton 0850hrs. Arrive Bowen 1310hrs. Spent several days surveying possible seaplane sites and Air Mail emergency landing sites up and down the Queensland coast.

04Jul35 Two 50 Gal fuel tanks and 3 airscrews sent by rail from Pt Cook to Bowen.

22Jul35 Fuel tanks and airscrews arrived, fitted to aircraft and flight tested.

23Jul35 Depart Bowen 0900hrs. Arrived Karumba on the Gulf of Carpentaria at 1410hrs and landed in the mouth of the Norman River. SQNLDR Hempel said this sector was harrowing because there was no water where the flying boat could land if it had problems that forced a landing. If a landing had been required the flying boat would certainly have broken apart as soon as it touched the ground and either seriously wounded or killed the crew.

24Jul35 Using Karumba as a base several flights made to survey the West Coast of the York Peninsula for a possible Karumba-Cairns route.

25Jul35 Tasked to search for missing Captain Stuart Campbell (ex-RAAF) in a Short Scion airplane on the Fly River Papua. Departed Karumba and flew to Thursday Island.

26Jul35 Depart Thursday Island arrived at Daru, Papua.

27Jul35 Located Captain Stuart Campbell at the Madiri Plantation on the Fly River. Aircraft landed to determine Campbell’s status then returned to Daru.

28Jul35 After landing at Daru it was discovered that the hull had been damaged by coral when landing and required repair. More importantly, the port engine had a serious defect and needed replacement. A new engine was called for but it was not until five weeks later that the engine arrived at Daru and repairs affected.

30Aug35 Departed Daru. Arrived in Port Moresby.

01Sep35 Began survey of Papuan coast investigating landing sites at Kikori, Kerema and Yule Island. The new port engine began acting up and the aircraft became unserviceable at Port Moresby awaiting spares parts from Sydney.

08Sep35 FLGOFF LE Burt admitted to Port Moresby Hospital with Malaria discharged several days later.

27Sep35 With engine repaired, departed Port Moresby for Thursday Island via Port Romilly and Daru.

28Sep35 Flew Thursday Island to Karumba and resumed survey work in the Gulf. Areas surveyed included Mornington Island, MacArthur River, Allen River, Norman River, Roper River and the West Coast of Cape York Peninsula. It was during a survey on the west coast that the aircraft hit a submerged log when landing near a remote mission. The port float was ripped off causing serious damage to the wing and destroying the float.

Oct-Nov Marooned for two months at a remote Mission Station near Normanton awaiting receipt of spares from Sydney.

09Oct35 A752 LAC JA O’Donnell admitted to Thursday Island Hospital with tropical ulcers, discharged on 29Oct.

16Nov35 FLTLT C.D Candy departed Richmond in Hawker Demon A1-9 with LAC A. Sherwood (relief fitter) to replace LAC O’Donnell.

18Nov35 Arrived Normanton. Fitters exchanged and Demon left for RIC on 22Nov35 arriving 0905 on 23Nov35. LAC O’Donnell admitted to Caulfield Repatriation Hospital 25Nov35, discharged 23Dec35.

26Nov35 A11-1 departed Normanton, arrived Darwin 1230hrs. Conducted a survey around Darwin for suitable sites.

02Dec35 In a most unusual task, A11-1 was draped with black crepe streamers when it left its moorings in Darwin at 0600 to carry aloft a burial urn containing the ashes of Mr G.A. Hobler a former Member of the North Australian Commission. The ashes were scattered over the township and the urn & streamers given to the NT Police for dispatch to Melbourne.

03Dec35 Departed Darwin for Wyndham.

03Dec35 Landed at Drysdale River. Conducted local surveys.

07Dec35 Arrived in Derby. Conducted local surveys.

12Dec35 Depart for Broome, arrived same day. Conducted local surveys.

14Dec35 Delayed in Broome. Accidental loss of special mooring anchor, diver had to be arranged to find the anchor.

18Dec35 Arrived in Port Hedland. Conducted local surveys.

20Dec35 Departed Port Hedland. Arrived at Carnarvon 1230hrs. Conducted local surveys.

21Dec35 Depart Carnarvon 0600 for planned flight to Geraldton for refueling then on to Perth. When taking–off from Geraldton after refueling the aircraft suffered damage to the stbd propeller and engine that forced the aircraft to return to Geraldton. Investigations showed the engine needed replacement and a lengthy repair to the hull was also needed.

Dec35 The aircraft was beached and months of marine growth such as weeds, barnacles, mussels, oysters etc. were scrapped from the hull and the hull completely dried-out.

Dec35 SQNLDR Hempel travelled overland to Perth and arranged for the necessary spares and an engine that had been prepositioned there some months earlier, to be shipped to Geraldton.

18Jan36 Departed Geraldton after all repairs were completed.

18Jan36 Arrived in Perth. Landed at Matilda Bay on the Swan River at 1030hrs.

23Jan36 Dep Perth for Albany.

23Jan36 Arr Albany 1155hrs in Princess Royal Harbour.

27Jan36 Dep Albany 0530hrs

27Jan36 Arr Israelite Bay 1350hrs. Remained here for some days because of stormy weather.

01Feb36 Dep Israelite Bay 0900, landed on Murat Bay, Ceduna at 1600hrs. SQNLDR Hempel stated the 510 mile (816 km) flight across the Great Australian Bight from Israelite Bay WA to Murat Bay SA was one of the worst sectors of the entire trip, because it was all over sea and at times they were more than 100 mi (160 km) off-shore.

03Feb36 Arr Port Lincoln 1230hrs landed in Boston Bay

05Feb36 Dep for Adelaide 0830hrs

05Feb36 Arr Adelaide 1125hrs. Landed on the North Arm of the Port River then taxied upstream to the Naval Depot Moorings at Birkenhead.

08Feb36 Dep Adelaide 0900 for Point Cook.

08Feb36 Arr Point Cook but could not land – bad sea state- diverted to Williamstown.

09Feb36 1030hrs returned to Point Cook to complete the Stage I survey flight – seven months after beginning the survey!

Feb36 Underwent major servicing at Point Cook.

30Apr36 Departed for Stage II of the ‘Round Australia Survey Flight’ again commanded by SNDLDR Hempel. Flying Point Cook-Sydney-Brisbane-Bowen-Karumba-Darwin and return. No major delays or technical issues encountered on Stage II.

28May36 Completed Stage II and returned to Point Cook. By this time the aircraft was in poor shape and it is unlikely that the RAAF was prepared to expend large sums to refurbish the aircraft when newer types such as the Seagull V were now in service.

1937 Conflicting information that the aircraft was sold or converted to components. On the balance of probabilities it is more likely the aircraft was converted and the residue destroyed.

A11-2

00May27 Constructed to RAF Order by Supermarine Aviation Works at their Hazel Road factory in Woolston, Southampton UK as a Mk.1 Southampton, Serial S1159 with construction No.1247.

29Oct27 Purchased by the RAAF for 17,000 pounds sterling.

00Nov27 Almost completely stripped and packed in one very large packing container and loaded aboard the 9,640 ton Commonwealth Line Steamship SS Ferndale.

02Dec27 Departed UK for Australia.

19Jan28 Arrived at Fremantle, WA.

26Jan28 Arrived at Victoria Docks, Port Melbourne VIC.

01Feb28 Received at Point Cook.

20Apr28 Reserialed from S1159 to A11-2. Along with A11-1 allocated to form the Coastal Reconnaissance Flight at Point Cook.

Feb-May28 Assembled, tested and readied for flight by No 1 Flying Training School engineering staff.

00May28 Planned for A11-1 and A11-2 to fly to South Australia in June to meet four Southamptons of the RAF Far East Flight and format with them for their arrival in Adelaide and later, Melbourne.

06Jun28 First flight in Australia.

30Nov28 Departed Point Cook for Launceston Pilot FLTLT F.A. Briggs with GRPCPT SJ Goble 2nd Member of the Air Board. Used by the Air Board to conduct recruitment interviews for Duntroon Military Academy in Launceston and Sydney.

04Dec28 Dep Launceston for Sydney. Arrive Sydney, remained two days then returned to Point Cook.

15Feb29 Surveyed proposed mail/passenger route from Western Port, VIC to Hobart via Launceston.

21Feb29 Used by the Air Board in a “Show the Flag Exercise” to conduct RAAF cadet interviews in Melbourne-Hobart-Sydney-Brisbane. Departed Port Melbourne for Hobart with a crew of GRPCPT S.J Goble Air Board Representative; SQNLDR R.J Brownell 1st pilot; FLTLT F.A Briggs 2nd pilot and, three mechanics. Conducted cadet interviews.

23Feb29 Departed Hobart 0700hrs for the 1st ever non-stop flight to Sydney. Arrived Farm Cove, Sydney at 1440hrs, a flight of some seven hours and forty minutes. Conducted cadet interviews.

24Feb29 Departed Sydney for Brisbane a flight of seven hours and fifty minutes. Conducted cadet interviews.

27Feb29 Departed Brisbane for Sydney a flight of seven hours and thirty minutes.

01Mar29 Arrived back at Point Cook. Conclusion of the ‘cadet interview exercise”.

15Apr29 An unusual occurrence when the CAS Air Commodore Williams flew the Minister for Defence Sir William Glasgow from Sydney to Brisbane for high level meetings. More than likely another PR related exercise of that time.

10Nov29 Departed Point Cook for Hobart TAS to conduct cadet interviews and perform a photographic survey of Port Davey and surrounds on the remote SW Coast of Tasmania. Crew consisted of GRPCPT S.J. Goble, SQNLDR R.J. Brownell, FLTLT F.A. Briggs, CPL Foggarty, LAC Souter and LAC Sims.

15Nov29 Departed Hobart at 2359hrs for a flight to Brisbane to conduct further cadet interviews. A precautionary refuelling stop was made at Jervis Bay before arriving in Farm Cove Sydney for an overnight stop.

16Nov29 Departed Sydney for Brisbane but was forced to make an unscheduled landing on the Richmond River at Ballina NSW for refuelling because of exceptionally strong headwinds. Departed for Brisbane next day.

20Nov29 Departed Brisbane for Sydney to conduct the last of the scheduled cadet interviews. When interviews were completed the aircraft and crew returned to Point Cook via Eden and Metung.

1933 A11-2 was called ‘Neptune’ in many press reports of the day. Nothing in official RAAF documentation to either support or refute this appellation.

14Feb34 Coastal Reconnaissance Flight disbanded.

15Feb34 Allocated to and received by the newly raised Seaplane Squadron at Point Cook.

16Feb34 Departed Pt Cook for Metung, VIC to carry out fleet exercises with HMAS Canberra near Gabo Island on 16/17th Feb.

19Feb34 could not land on return to Point Cook because of weather, diverted to land in Corio Bay, Geelong.

22Feb34 acted as airborne SAR for three Bulldog and three Wapiti aircraft from Point Cook to King Island.

04Mar34 departed for flight to King Island – moored overnight in Lady Barron Bay

05Mar34 acted as airborne SAR for three Bulldog and three Wapiti aircraft from King Island to Point Cook.

10Mar34 attempted to intercept ‘enemy’ warships 90 miles west of King Island in the Bass Strait. Failed to find the two ‘enemy’ warships until afternoon of the next day. Enemy ships were HMAS Canberra and HMAS Australia.

03Apr34 departed for Twofold Bay, NSW to overhaul seaplane mooring and exercise with HMA Ships from Nowra.

04Apr34 an attempt to take-off from Twofold Bay, NSW was thwarted because of the sea state and the tail plane and stbd propeller were seriously damaged.

07Apr34 returning to Point Cook the stbd engine failed over 90-Mile Beach and the aircraft was forced to land in Lake Reeve, VIC because of the very rough sea state. After landing it was discovered the lake was very shallow and a take-off could not be carried out. A local fisherman (Hugh Dalziel) witnessed the aircraft land in the lake and waded through the shallow water to see if he could be of assistance. As luck would have it, the fisherman had an 18yr old son who just happened to have one of the very few private radios in Australia at that time. The son was fetched forthwith and Point Cook were informed of the aircraft’s plight within an hour of the accident.

08Apr34 Technical staff at Point Cook determined the only course of action was to dismantle the aircraft in-situ and move it to nearby Lake Wellington. Accordingly, an eight-man salvage party left Point Cook and arrived at the aircraft on 09Apr34. The aircraft was dismantled hauled manually over a mile of ground and placed onto a low-loader transport vehicle. It was then taken through three miles of timber/scrub to a bush road and finally another 36 miles to the prepared site at Clydebank on the shores of Lake Wellington, reaching there on the evening of 26th April. Another two weeks was then needed to rebuild the aircraft to a flyable state. Finally, after a 40 day adventure, the aircraft was ready to return to point Cook on 15May34.

16May34 Returned to Point Cook and underwent major servicing.

14Aug34 After prolonged servicing the aircraft departed for Fleet exercises off Metung.

08Oct34 Together with A11-1 departed Pt Cook at 1340hrs to rendezvous with four RAF Rangoon flying boats over Frankston. The formation then flew over Melbourne shores where a State reception was held for the RAF aircraft.

18Oct34 Together with A11-1 departed Pt Cook at 0500hrs to rendezvous with HMS Sussex at 0525hrs. Escorted the ship, which was carrying HRH Prince Henry on his State visit to Australia, to Port Melbourne where a State reception was held.

20Oct34 Departed at 1420hrs to continue the SAR for missing Holman Airways DH.86 Express airliner ‘Miss Hobart’ which went missing the previous day on a scheduled flight between Melbourne and Launceston.

10Nov34 Part of the RAAF Flying Tribute over RAAF Laverton in connection with the visit of HRH The Duke of Gloucester.

19Nov34 Part of the RAAF Flying Tribute over RAAF Richmond in connection with the visit of HRH The Duke of Gloucester.

29Nov34 Departed Sydney for Pt Cook via Batemans Bay-Eden and Metung. Arrived Metung where heavy gales delayed departure until 1030hrs 03Dec34.

03Dec34 Arrived Pt Cook 1315hrs to end the support of HRH visit to Australia.

06May35 Along with A11-1 led a 29 aircraft fly-past to commemorate the Kings Silver Jubilee Parade in Melbourne.

06Aug35 Carried out parachute ‘pull-offs’ with RAAF Parachute Course at Pt Cook – six personnel performed drops.

09Aug35 Further parachute ‘pull-offs’ – four personnel.

12Aug35 An unknown number of RAAF personnel performed the first Southampton parachute drop from the outboard wing platforms using special 28ft training parachutes. Drops supervised by FLTLT P.G. Heffernan. Over the next three years this flying-boat was used by many ADF personnel to make their first controlled parachute descent from the outboard wing platforms.

16Sep35 Complete overhaul and refurbishment commenced. Project expected to take six months or more to complete. In the event the aircraft was placed into long term storage after the overhaul was completed.

1938 Reconditioned as an instructional training aid aircraft for the Seaplane Training Squadron. Intended to be a flying navigation school room for RAAF Cadets flying over Port Phillip Bay.

22Sep38 Test flown after prolonged storage and reconditioning.

17Nov38 The following personnel made parachute drops from the aircraft on this day: FLTLT MV Lansell; FLGOFF Allshorn; CPL D Graham (RNZAF) and LAC RE Baty (RNZAF).

02May39 FLTLT Garing flew to the crash site of a 21 Sqn Anson in Port Phillip Bay carrying SAR equipment and personnel. All three on board the Anson were killed on impact.

30Jun39 Seaplane Training Squadron, Flying Training School RAAF Base Point Cook disbanded on this date.

01Aug39 A11-2 taken on charge by the newly formed No 10 General Reconnaissance Sqn at RAAF Base Point Cook.

28Aug30 Allocated to support the four trainee officers on the No 10 Seaplane Conversion Course.

00Sep39 Several live parachute pull-off drops made throughout the Month.

13Oct39 Provided a fly past for the graduating officers of No 10 Seaplane Conversion Course.

23Oct39 Allocated to support the four trainee officers on the No 11 Seaplane Conversion Course.

00Oct39 Several live parachute pull-off drops made throughout the Month.

14Dec39 Provided a fly past for the graduating officers of No 11 Seaplane Conversion Course.

10Apr40 Air Board Agenda 2754/40 approved conversion of the airframe and instruments. Non-recoverable items and airframe residue to be burnt. No mention made of the engines.

SY 2020-05-30

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