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NOTE ON DATES: IMPORTANT: For consistency, the Date is given as the date the mission TOOK OFF since the precise time of a loss is not always certain. Take Off date is unambigous and fixed in the official records, but obviously in those cases where the incident occurred before midnight UK time, then the Take Off Date will be the same as the Incident Date. Of course, most Bomber Command missions flew through midnight, therefore a Luftwaffe claim against a plane - or a locally generated crash report - may record the incident as occurring on the day following our Take Off Date. Bear this in mind when cross-referencing to our Luftwaffe Victories by Name/Date Database and other Luftwaffe sources. In some cases other sources may quote the date following our date, using locally generated reports as their source. To add to the potential for confusion, remember to take into account a Luftwaffe recorded date will be in local time, 1 hour ahead of UK time. When we discover a validated Incident Date we change our record if necessary



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You searched for: “1944-06-12

#Name*First NamesTitleRankRAF Equivalent RankService No.BornNationalityRoleAwardsAir ForceCommandUnitDateofIncident *See NoteAircraftTypeSerialCodeVictories (Fighters)BaseTimeMission                        Incident                        FateCommemoratedPhoto (Click to Expand)Referring Database                        Notes                        Links/Archive Reports
551 AndersenKenneth Peder ChristianFlight Sergeant4291281916New ZealanderBomb AimerRNZAFBomber Command75 Sqn RNZAF
1944-11-04LancasterIIIND917AA:OMepal11:31SolingenBrought down some 9 km SE of target area, crashing near Wermelskirchen. The crew were buried at Wermelskirchen, but later transferred to RheinbergKilledRheinberg War Cemetery 5.C.4Son of Antun and Grace Andersen, of Hastings, Hawke's Bay, New Zealand
552 AndersenRobert CharlesFlight Lieutenant414876AustraliaRAAF115Sqn RAF
1944-05-22RAAF Honour Roll
553 AndersenThomas MervynFlight Sergeant425577AustraliaRAAF179Sqn RAF
1944-01-17RAAF Honour Roll
554 AndersenPaul ChristianCaptainFlight LieutenantO-15517831917AmericanObserverUSAAF8th Air Force566th Bomber Squadron (389th Bombardment Group (H))1944-09-05B-24J42-50511RR:FHethel (Station #114), Norfolk, EnglandKarlsruhe (Mission #605), GermanySee Archive report for detailsPoW, Stalag Luft 1 Barth-Vogelsang, Prussia now Poland
555 AndersenPaulSergeantDenmark CanadaRCAFBomber Command44Sqn
1944-07-15LancasterIIIPB206KM-QDunholme Lodge2232GardeningKilledRunnymede

Paradie Archive DatabaseDanish parents, but he held dual citizenship at time of enlistment. On 15/16 July, Andersen took off on his last operation. Took off at 22.32 hrs. from Dunholme Lodge. Gardening over Danish waters. Landfall near Agger on the western coast of Jutland, crossed the eastern coast north of Grenaa to reach their Gardening area north of Sjællands Odde. Aircraft was lost without a trace. Possibly victim of Lt Dräger from 3./NJG 3, who claimed a four-engined aircraft 20 miles off the Jutland coast at Hvide Sande at 02.10 hrs. Paul Andersen’s nineteenth operation in Bomber Command.
556 AndersonHugh JohnFlight LieutenantC/17844Flight Engineer DFM

RCAFBomber Command405Sqn RCAF
1944-09-26LancasterIIIPB129LQ-A RAF Gransden Lodge, Cambridgeshire 1200Cap Gris Nez See archive report for full details InjuredNone - survived the war. Passed away 1965. Paradie Archive Database Read Archive Report
557 AndersonM WFlight LieutenantRCAFBomber Command408Sqn RCAF
1944-11-16HalifaxVIINP770EQ-GLinton on Ouse1222MunsterAbandoned over BelgiumParadie Archive Database
558 AndersonBruce BenjaminFlying OfficerJ/35534Age 27CanadianBomb AimerRCAFBomber Command415Sqn RCAF
1944-11-02HalifaxIIIMZ6036U-ERAF RAF East Moor, Yorkshire1606DusseldorfSee Archive report for further detailsKilledRheinberg War Cemetery. Plot 7. Row B. Collective Grave 14-18
Courtesy John Jones

Born on the 26th December 1917 in Llandudno, Wales. Son of Benjamin Wellington Anderson and Margaret Ethel Anderson (née Jackson), of Toronto, Ontario. Canada Grave inscription: 'His Sun Has Set While It Is Yet Day'.
559 AndersonHoward FrancisFlight Sergeant W/Op Air GunnerJ/92358RCAFBomber Command419Sqn RCAF
1944-08-25LancasterXKB708VR-ERAF Middleton St George1934Russelsheim (Opel works) Crashed at Boscombe Down on return KilledBrookwood Military Cemetery, Surrey. Grave 43.G.3. Paradie Archive Database Read Archive Report
560 AndersonRobert AllanSergeantR/191468Age 20CanadaAir GunnerRCAFBomber Command420 Sqn RCAF
1944-04-20HalifaxIIILW692PT-VRAF Tholthorpe, North Yorkshire2113LensSee archive report for further brief detailsPoW No: 4176 Camp: Stalag Luft Sagan and BelariaNone - Survived the warParadie Archive DatabasePromoted to Fg.Off. 1st September 1944
561 AndersonWilliam FrankFlying OfficerJ/29202PilotRCAFBomber Command426Sqn RCAF
1944-11-01HalifaxVIINP709OW-ARAF Linton-on-Ouse, Yorkshire1744OberhausenSee Archive report for further detailsMissing - believed killedRunnymede Memorial. Panel 244
Courtesy John Jones

Paradie Archive DatabaseFurther information: Born on the 05th January 1923. Also remembered on a cross at Pine Grove Cemetery, Norland, Ontario, Canada. A student at Malvern Collegiate Institute in the Beach neighbourhood in Toronto when he joined the RCAF on 23rd April 1942. He was a business and commerce student and an all-round athlete who was popular with his crew. Son of John J. and Beatrice G.V. Anderson of Toronto, Ontario who were married during the first world war at Sandgate, Kent on 3rd November 1915.

(Courtesy John Jones)

562 AndersonWilliam BrodieSquadron LeaderJ892426th February 1914 in Winnipeg, ManitobaCanadianPilotDFC
RCAFBomber Command429 (Bison) Sqn RCAF
1944-06-08HalifaxIIILW128AL:VLeeming23:15Acherers Rail YardsSee archive report for detailsDied of injuriesBrookwood Military Cemetery Plot 49 Row G Grave 9.Paradie Archive Database
563 AndersonLeslie LesterFlying OfficerJ/18158CanadaWireless Operator/Air GunnerDFM
RCAFBomber Command431 Sqn RCAF
1944-04-27HalifaxIIIMZ529SE:ERAF Croft, Yorkshire23:25MontzenSee Archive report for further detailsPoW No: 5976 Camp: Stalag Luft Sagan and BelariaNone - survived the warAccident ReportArchive Report
564 AndersonL EFlying OfficerRCAFBomber Command50Sqn
1944-09-11LancasterINF919VN-DSkellingthorpe2054DarmstadtCrashed at Niederkirchen bei DeidsheimKilledRheinberg War CemeteryParadie Archive Database
565 AndersonA JFlight SergeantRCAFBomber Command61Sqn
1944-08-25LancasterIIIPA998QR-OSkellingthorpe2101DarmstadtCrashed at Gross-GerauKilledRunnymede Paradie Archive Database
566 AndersonLloyd GeorgeSergeantR/131824Age 21CanadaAir GunnerRCAFBomber Command625Sqn
1944-03-30LancasterIIIW5009CF-ZRAF Kelstern2144Nurnberg See archive report for further details KilledRheinberg War Cemetery- Coll. Grave 17. D. 12-18Paradie Archive Database Read Archive Report
567 AndersonJohn GrahamFlying OfficerNZ/421344PilotRNZAFBomber Command207Sqn
1944-11-16LancasterINF979EM-BRAF Silsby, Lincolnshire1254DurenSee archive report for further detailsKilledVenray War Cemetery. Collective grave V. C. 5-8Read Archive Report
568 AndersonH H WFlight SergeantRNZAFBomber Command49Sqn
1944-03-30LancasterIIIJB466EA-AFiskerton2206NurnbergCrashed SchleusingenKilledBerlin 1939-1945 War Cemetery
569 AndersonAlexander StuartFlight LieutenantNZ/391873PilotRNZAFFighter Command487Sqn RNZAF
1944-11-18MosquitoFB.VIHR248EG-KRAF Thorney Island, Sussex2345IntruderSee archive report for further detailsKilledRheinberg War Cemetery. Grave 11.A.21Read Archive Report
570 AndersonWilliam GowlandSergeant1501026Wireless Operator/Air GunnerRAFVRBomber Command101 Sqn
1944-04-27LancasterILL750SR:PLudford Magna21:40FriedrichshafenSee Archive Report for detailsKilledVevey (St. Martin’s) Cemetery Grave 92Son of William and May Anderson, of Murton, Co. Durham, England
571 AndersonT JSergeantBomber Command158Sqn
1944-01-20HalifaxIIIHX335NP-PLissett2022MagdeburgCrashed OlvenstedtPoW
572 AndersonT B RFlying OfficerPilotFighter231Sqn
1944-01-14MustangIAG601SortieDamaged
573 AndersonW FFlying Officer124906PilotFighter247Sqn
1944-06-17TyphoonIbMN8090KilledBayeux War Cemetery France
574 Anderson'Andy' William JamesFlight LieutenantJ/16562 (R/82659)Age 22 (note: the CWGC incorrectly states he was 26)CanadianPilotRCAFFighter Command

Tactical Air Force

412Sqn RCAF
1945-03-30SpitfireLF.IXMJ275

(Earlier accidents in Spitfire Vb BL808 and Spitfire IX BR637)

VZ-JB.88 Heesch, Holland10:55RecceSee archive report for details. Involved in two accidents prior to his loss.

Crashed at Zelham

KilledZelhem General Cemetery. Plot E. Row 2. Grave 14. Also remembered on parents' grave in Lowry Cemetery, Carp, Ontario, Canada

Zelhem General Cemetery (Holland)

Born on the 21st September 1922 in Ontario, Canada. Educated at Kilburn Continuation School. Worked as an office boy in the civil service in Ontario. Enlisted on the 22nd January 1941. Trained at No. 3 Initial Training School, No. 13 Elementary Flying Training School, No. 9 Service Flying Training School. Awarded pilot wings on the 24th October 1941.

Embarked from Canada to England on the 13th October 1941. At no. 3 Personnel Reception Centre on the 23rd November 1941. Further training with No. 57 Operational Training Unit. joined 416 squadron on the 01st October 1942. Served a tour of 30 operational sorties in Malta with 143 squadron. Wounded in combat and sent back to Canada for a leave of 30 days before returning to England. Commissioned on the 19th November 1942. Flying Officer on the 19th June 1943. Flight Lieutenant on the 19th December 1944. Joined 412 squadron on the 25th November 1944. A total of 60 hours of operational sorties.

Son of William Gilmour Anderson (died 1950, age 68) and of Annie Euphie Anderson (nee Ross - died 1968, age 81), of RR No. 1, Woodlawn, Ontario, Canada. Brother of Gilmour Ross (died 19th January 2000, age 84), Hugh Haig (died 2010, age 91), Ethel Beatrice (died 1996, age 83), Margaret Elinor and Marion Elaine. Friend of Miss Edna Wipp of 123 Longthornton Road, Streatham, London SW.16. Epitaph: 'Be Ye Also Ready: For In Such An Hour As Ye Think Not The Son Of Man Cometh'.

575 AndersonT GFlight LieutenantFighter418Sqn RCAF
1944-06-05MosquitoVIIntruderDamaged
576 AndersonKFlight SergeantBomber Command49Sqn
1944-03-22LancasterIIIND536EA-FFiskerton1905FrankfurtCrashed RonnenbergKilledReichswald Forest War Cemetery
577 AndersonA LPilot OfficerBomber Command49Sqn
1944-05-07LancasterIIIJB241EA-KFiskerton2157SalbrisCrashed St-Doulchard {Cher}KilledSt-Doulchard Communal Cemetery
578 AndersonP ASergeantAir Gunner1939-45 Star; France and Germany Star; War Medal 1939-45Bomber Command51Sqn
1944-11-09HalifaxIIIMZ624MH-NSnaith1601GelsenkirchenDamaged over target area
Anderson qualified as an Air Gunner at No. 1 A.G.S. Pembrey in December 1943 and commenced his operational tour in 51 Squadron, a Halifax unit operating out of RAF Snaith, in August 1944. He was to serve as both a Mid-Upper and Rear Gunner in Flying Officer L. C. Ainsley’s crew throughout his tour. His early sorties largely comprised daylight trips to targets in France, namely V1 sites and enemy airfields and railway marshalling yards. But German targets also made up 51’s operational agenda, the Squadron participating in the attack on Homberg on 27 August 1944, the first time Bomber Command had visited the Ruhr by day. As Anderson would later recall, ‘When we approached the target I could see a huge black cloud of flak bursts. It was really terrifying ... We bombed with the second wave ... and then got the hell out of it.’ It was in the course of 51’s next day light operation to Germany on 11 September 1944 - an attack on the plant at Nordstern, near Gelsenkirchen - that Anderson was slightly wounded and his Wireless Operator seriously so.

‘I could hear and feel the shells bursting around us and even smell the fumes of the exploding shells which burst so close that the shrapnel ripped in with an awful twanging sound. I heard someone cry over the intercom “That last one got me.” Then my intercom went dead. The wire had been cut by a piece of shrapnel ... A short while after I felt a thump on my leg and knew I was hit ... The [American] M.O. gave us two and half bottles of whiskey between us and we made very short work of that - and did I need it. On examination the next day, we counted 188 flak holes and how none of us were killed is still a mystery. The skipper received an immediate award of the DFC. and he deserved it.’ He and his crew were lucky indeed to make it home. His skipper was awarded an immediate DFC (London Gazette 31 October 1944, refers), the recommendation stating: ‘This officer is a most competent pilot and first class captain of aircraft. One night in September 1944, he was detailed for an attack on a synthetic oil plant at Nordstern. When nearing the target area the aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft fire and the starboard engine was rendered unserviceable. Shortly afterwards the aircraft was hit in the port aileron, making it difficult to steer correctly. In spite of this Flying Officer Ainsley continued to the target and bombed it. On the turn for home the bomber was hit once more. The port engine was affected and the hydraulic system was put out of action. After crossing the English coast the defective port engine became useless. Flight Lieutenant Ainsley thereupon headed for the nearest airfield where he made a safe landing with the undercarriage retracted. This officer set a fine example of skill, courage and tenacity.’ Notwithstanding the momentous events of 11 September, pilot and crew carried out five further sorties before the month’s end, namely attacks on Kiel and Neuss, and three daylight outings to France. Dusseldorf and Bochum followed in November, and Upladen, Cologne and Osnabruck in December, Anderson noting in his Flying Log Book that an Me. 110 was beaten off over the latter target on the 5th and claimed as a ‘Probable’. Then in the period January-April 1945, he and his crew carried out another 15 trips to Germany, Cologne and Hamburg being among the the targets. Tour-expired - a total of 35 sorties with 78 hours by day and 198 by night - Anderson was posted to a Transport Command unit.

579 AndersonS MPilot OfficerBomber Command514Sqn
1944-07-20LancasterIHK571JI-LWaterbeach2307HombergKilledReichswald Forest War Cemetery
580 AndersonLionel DavidFlight Lieutenant13880161922PilotRAFVRBomber Command515 Sqn
1944-04-26MosquitoVINS8953P:?Little Snoring00:55BSSerrate patrol in Venlo area of Holland. Hit by Flak and crashed on Deelen airfield, time unknown. (Nachtjagd Combat Archive (16 March 1944 - 11 May 1944) Part 2 - Theo Boiten)KilledArnhem (Moscowa) General Cemetery Grave 22Son of Joseph and Deborah Anderson, of Neasden, Middlesex.
581 AndersonASergeantBomber Command550Sqn
1944-08-27LancasterIIIEE193BQ-CNorth Killingholme2113StettinCrashed in BalticKilledRunnymede
582 AndersonE DSergeantBomber Command57Sqn
1944-07-31LancasterIIIND954DX-QEast Kirkby1741Joigny-la-RochePoW
583 AndersonJ W TSergeantBomber Command576Sqn
1944-01-14LancasterIME585UL-H2Elsham WoldsBraunschweigCrashed BruchhausenKilledHannover War Cemetery
584 AndersonA DSergeantBomber Command61Sqn
1944-01-27LancasterIW4315QR-QSkellingthorpe1738BerlinDitched off Guernsey on return Archive Report
585 AndersonA D MFlight SergeantBomber Command61Sqn
1944-04-11LancasterIIIJA695QR-WConingsby2048AachenPoW
586 AndersonW A MSergeantBomber Command626Sqn
1944-01-30LancasterIME587UM-X2Wickenby1718BerlinKilledRunnymede
587 AndersonW RSergeantBomber Command640Sqn
1944-02-19HalifaxIIILW550C8-ULeconfield.0022.LeipzigPoW
588 AndersonJFlight SergeantBomber Command76Sqn
1944-04-24HalifaxIIILK789MP-LHolme on Spalding Moor2209KarlsruheCrashed at Welney NorfolkInjuredArchive Report
589 AndersonEPilot OfficerBomber Command83Sqn
1944-01-20LancasterIIIND414OL-KWyton 1614BerlinExploded over GrossziehtenKilledBerlin 1939-1945 War Cemetery
590 AndersonJackFlight Sergeant12177431923Air GunnerRAFVRBomber Command83Sqn
1944-01-01LancasterIIIND330OL-OGransden Lodge7BerlinThe aircraft was borrowed by 405 Sqn who also provided the crew. The Lancaster was brought down by enemy fire 3km West of Wahrenholz at approximately 0230 hrs. It is possible that this aircraft was shot down by Lt Heinz Oloff 2./NJG1 (Nachtjagd, War Diaries - Dr. Theo E.W. Boiten) .The crews burials took place at Wahrenholz Cemetery on 6 Jan 1944KilledHanover War Cemetery Plot 6 Row G Grave 1
Son of Ernest Sykes Anderson and Alice Anderson, of Stanningley, Yorkshire
591 AndersonJ SSergeantBomber Command9Sqn
1944-07-31LancasterIIILM453WS-EBardney1730Rilly-la-MontageCrashed near Puisieulx {Marne}KilledClichy New Communal Cemetery
592 AndersonSydney LouisFlying Officer410192AustraliaRAAF100Sqn RAAF
1944-05-20RAAF Honour Roll
593 AndersonAndrew CharlesFlight Sergeant414634AustraliaRAAF104Sqn RAF
1944-02-17RAAF Honour Roll
594 AndersonMaurice Reuben JohnFlying Officer264993AustraliaRAAF11Sqn RAAF
1944-05-02RAAF Honour Roll
595 AndersonDonald AlbertWarrant Officer401756AustraliaRAAF458Sqn RAAF
1944-04-08RAAF Honour Roll
596 AndersonPeter RobertPilot Officer28817AustraliaRAAF460Sqn RAAF
1944-03-31RAAF Honour Roll
597 AndersonLeslie DeanPilot Officer414121AustraliaRAAF466Sqn RAAF
1944-01-29RAAF Honour Roll
598 AndersonEric JamesFlight Sergeant423579AustraliaRAAF51Sqn RAF
1944-08-19RAAF Honour Roll
599 AndersonThomas Robert BowdenFlight Lieutenant409081AustraliaRAAF65Sqn RAF
1944-06-10RAAF Honour Roll
600 AndersonAlan FordGrp Cpt1910 Simla IndiaPilotDSO & Bar

DFC

Commander Order of Orange-Nassau Netherlands

1939-45 Star; Air Crew Europe Star, clasp, France and Germany; War Medal 1939-45; Coronation 1953;
RAFFighter Command613Sqn RAF

228Sqn RAF

Hector bi-plane, Lysander, Tomahawk, MustangSurvived war. Retired to Minorca. Returned to UK, died December 2002 aged 92

1940 Suicidal sorties over Calais in an obsolete 170 m.p.h. Hector biplane. Led the first ever single-engined fighter sortie to Germany from the U.K. Many low-level sorties flown over Holland in the latter period of war with 2TAF.

See Archive Report.

DFC Citation London Gazette 5 November 1940. The original recommendation states: ‘During the months of May and June 1940, this officer was in charge of 613 Squadron which operated during the evacuation of the B.E.F. In spite of the fact that this squadron was without previous experience of operational flying, a number of important sorties were successfully accomplished in the face of heavy anti-aircraft fire. Squadron Leader Anderson took part in each of these which included the bombing of batteries in the vicinity of Calais, and the dropping of ammunition and water for the garrison holding the Citadel there. All these operations were successfully carried out. This was substantially due to the confidence and enthusiasm which Squadron Leader Anderson inspired in his junior officers and to his magnificent leadership.’
DSO Citation: London Gazette 5 February 1943. The original recommendation states: ‘Wing Commander Anderson has been in command of No. 268 Squadron since December 1940. At the time the Squadron was equipped with Lysanders and in order to get some sort of operations for his pilots he arranged for dusk and dawn patrols off the East Coast. In May 1941 the Squadron was re-equipped with Tomahawk aircraft and by September was fitted with a No. 19 A.F. wireless set giving larger range. On 19 October 1941, the first attack was made on targets at Ijmuiden and Dan Helder in Holland with the Wing Commander leading. Several other attempts were made by Wing Commander Anderson but were abandoned owing to lack of cloud cover or fog. In December, in order to get further operational experience, Wing Commander Anderson asked for and obtained permission to be attached to R.A.F. Ibsley with a view to getting combat experience. Working under 10 Group, Wing Commander Anderson and three pilots carried out convoy patrols. In January 1942, owing to the numerous mechanical failures of the Alison Engine, H.Q., Army Command, stopped operational flying. Throughout the above period the Squadron continued its normal role of training with H.Q. No. 2 Corps. In April 1942, the Squadron was re-equipped with Mustang aircraft and in June, at the request of Wing Commander Anderson, it was permitted to carry out shipping reconnaissance off the Dutch Coast. In August 1942, the Squadron was attached to No. 12 (Fighter) Group for full fighter operations and was equipped with V.H.F. and operated on interceptor patrols, shipping reconnaissance off the Dutch Coast and attack of ground targets in Holland and Germany. It has been due to the personal effort of Wing Commander Anderson that his squadron has been enabled to carry out offensive operations and he himself has always led the first of any new type of sortie. In October, Wing Commander Anderson led a section of four Mustangs to North-West Germany and attacked targets on the Dortmund-Ems Canal. This was the first time that single-engined fighters based in England had attacked targets in Germany. Throughout this period, Wing Commander Anderson has led: 6 Tomahawk operations over Holland; 2 Mustang “Rhubarbs” - one over Holland and the other over Germany; 12 Mustang shipping reconnaissance operations; and 3 Mustang interceptor patrols over the North Sea. Wing Commander Anderson has always displayed the greatest initiative to get his squadron onto offensive operations. he is a born leader and has instilled an operational attitude into not only the pilots but also the N.C.Os and ground crew as well. He is absolutely tireless and one of the most enthusiastic Commanding Officers I have met. Through his magnificent leadership, courage and example he has produced in 268 Squadron a thoroughly sound and reliable fighting unit not only in its primary role of Fighter Reconnaissance but also in its secondary and more offensive roles.’
Bar to DSO Citation London Gazette 27 April 1945. The original recommendation states: ‘Between 15 December 1944 and 21 February 1945, Group Captain Anderson carried out 6 reconnaissance sorties over enemy territory. Besides bringing back valuable information, this officer and his No. 2 made the following claims: 1 1000-ton ship destroyed (seen on fire); 2 1000-ton ships severely damaged (one on fire); 1 minelayer damaged; 1 tug destroyed; 3 tugs damaged (one on fire); 3 barges severely damaged; 1 500-ton ship and sundry small M.Vs damaged; 1 ferry damaged; 2 M.T. destroyed; 1 Met and 1 A.F.V. damaged. These attacks were carried out often in the face of intense accurate flak and twice Group Captain Anderson’s aircraft was hit and damaged. Since the date of his last award this officer has carried out 49 sorties over enemy territory, some of which were to provide photographs necessary during the planning of “Overlord”. Besides the claims made above, he has scored successes against a number of different types of target including 16 locos damaged, parties of troops on the ground, and damage to transport vehicles of all descriptions, at all times displaying a fine offensive spirit and courage of a high order. Group Captain Anderson has proved himself to be an outstanding Commanding Officer. The Recce. Wing he has commanded in the Field since August 1944 has achieved magnificent results whilst working with 1st Canadian Army. The results achieved, at a small cost to the Wing, are an indication of its efficiency. This high standard is very largely due to the efficiency of its Commanding Officer and the magnificent example he sets to the rest of his unit.’
Order of Orange Nassau Citation London Gazette 31 October 1947. The original recommendation states: ‘Group Captain Anderson commanded No. 35 Reconnaissance Wing from 30 August 1944 until 1 December 1945. The Wing operated from Gilze Rijen and Mill during the winter of 1944-45. During this period his Wing was responsible not only for tactical reconnaissance and artillery spotting, but also for provision of photographic cover extending deep into enemy territory, without which detailed plans for operations by the Army and Air Force could not have been made. Group Captain Anderson proved himself to be a courageous leader; he himself flew a great number of operational sorties and frequently insisted on leading missions which, by the nature of their tasks, expected heavy opposition. Under his inspiring leadership the Wing carried out all these tasks in an exemplary manner.’

Results 551 to 600 of 38118.

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