AR banner
Search Tips Advanced Search
Back to Top
List of Aviator Losses  •  
Table of Contents  •  
ArchiveDatabase  •  

1945-02-09 The Loss of Mitchells FR165 (Maas) and FW212 (Manschot)

Crash site: Tienen, Belgium

Crash cause: flying accident, collision in zero visibility

Aircraft of 320 (Dutch) Squadron RAF Bomber Command, crashed on February 9th, 1945, near Tienen (Tirlemont), Belgium, after a mid-air collision 20 minutes after take-off from RAF Melsbroek, Belgium. Collision occurred at approx. 15:20 hours. One four and one five-men crew, seven KIA, two survivors. Aircraft touched each other, directly after coming out of clouds after flying in close formation. Target was Geldern in Germany.

Geldern railway station, the goods transportation sector. Now derelict, but once a Nazi transport junction, hence an Allied target. Geldern 060412-1

Preparing the Mitchells for combat, RAF Melsbroek/Zaventem, winter 1944-45. Mitchell FR199 NO-M, flown by Res 1Lt Vl WnrDirk van Dijk, was part of 'ivory box' in which the fatal collision took place. Source: @St.M.Vl.P. 1939-50, JPK collection 9-6-6


Name

1. Maas, Johannes Hendrikus (Jan)

JH Maas Source SLH

Rank

Res 2Lt Vl Wnr, S/Lt., Pilot

Stb.Nr. 21082

Decorations

Vliegerkruis, 2x

Born

13/11/1916

Place

Manggar, NEI

Squadron

RAF 320 (Dutch) Sqn Bomber Command

Ops/hr

94/

Aircraft

Mitchell Mk. II B-25C Nr. FR165 NO-K

Base

RAF Melsboek, B

Mission

Raid on Geldern, Germany

Status

Safe, aircraft collided with Mitchell FW212 in mid-air. Time approx. 15:20h. Managed to leave FR16 by parachute and landed safely.

age

Accident

9/2/1945

Place

Tienen, B

Buried

He died in Spain in the 1990's.

Known to

OGS

yes

CWGC

no

Other crew

2. Res 2Lt Wnr ML G. Claassen, Copilot/Nav - safe

3. Sgt Vltg Sch MLD D.H.J. Born, Ag - KIA

4. Sgt Vltg Sch MLD H. Harsevoort, Ag - KIA

Remarks

He was credited with one 6.000t cargo vessel sunk 10' WSW of Eierland (?) on 23/9/1942

Vliegerkruis 1, 1/11/1943

Als commandant van een Mitchell-bomvliegtuig van het 320e Squadron R.D.N.A.S. van Onzen Marine Luchtvaartdienst in het Vereenigd Koninkrijk, bij den dagaanval op een vijandelijk vliegveld nabij Brest op 25 October 1943, blijk gegeven van moed, koelbloedigheid, bekwaamheid en voortvarendheid door, nadat zijn vliegtuig tengevolge van het explodeeren van het vliegtuig van zijn groepscommandant, ruggelings in een steilen duikvlucht was geworpen, waarbij tevens door een voltreffer kabels der trimorganen werden vernield, er in te slagen het zwaar beschadigde vliegtuig met veel inspanning onder controle te brengen en door behendig manouvreeren het zware vijandelijk afweervuur weten te ontlopen, voorts onder hevig afweervuur de nodige orders gegeven door het verlenen van Eerste Hulp aan den zwaargewonden mitrailleurschutter en het herstellen van den trim van het vliegtuig waarna hij, na doeltreffende voorzorgsmaatregelen te hebben genomen, een uitstekende noodlanding volbracht.

Vliegerkruis 2, 21/12/1944

Gedurende geruimen tijd bij het 320e Squadron R.D.N.A.S. van Onzen Marine Luchtvaartdienst in het Vereenigd Koninkrijk, in oorlogsvluchten tegen den vijand blijk gegeven van moed, bekwaamheid, volharding en plichtsbetrachting.

Memorial

None known

GB arrival

31/5/1940 with Dutch vessel 'Batavier II' from Cherbourg, France, after an escape from Holland on 16/5/1940. Detached KL to KM. Send from England to NEI 1/9/1940 for military flying training


Name

2. Claassen, Gerard

G. Claassen Source SLH

Rank

Res 2Lt Wnr ML, S/Lt., Copilot/Nav

Decorations

Vliegerkruis

Born

Place

Squadron

RAF 320 (Dutch) Sqn Bomber Command

Ops/hr

Aircraft

Mitchell Mk. II B-25C Nr. FR165 NO-K

Base

RAF Melsboek, B

Mission

Raid on Geldern, Germany

Status

Safe, aircraft collided with Mitchell FW212 in mid-air. Time approx. 15:20h. Managed to leave FR16 by parachute and landed safely.

age

Accident

9/2/1945

Place

Tienen, B

Known to

OGS

yes

CWGC

no

Other crew

1. Res 2Lt Vl Wnr J.H. Maas, Pilot - safe

3. Sgt Vltg Sch MLD D.H.J. Born, Ag - KIA

4. Sgt Vltg Sch MLD H. Harsevoort, Ag - KIA

Remarks

Alive on 3/2005 and living in The Netherlands

Vliegerkruis, 21/12/1944

Gedurende geruimen tijd bij het 320e Squadron R.D.N.A.S. van Onzen Marine Luchtvaartdienst in het Vereenigd Koninkrijk, in oorlogsvluchten tegen den vijand blijk gegeven van moed, bekwaamheid, volharding en plichtsbetrachting.

Memorial

None known

GB arrival


Name

3. Born, Dirk Herman Jacob

D.H.J. Born Source: @St.M.Vl.P. 1939-50 Leopoldsburg 050710 Born DHJ

Rank

Sgt Vltg Sch MLD, Sgt., Ag

Stb.Nr. 12899

Decorations

None known

Born

23/8/1916

Place

Utrecht, NL

Squadron

RAF 320 (Dutch) Sqn Bomber Command

Ops/hr

Aircraft

Mitchell Mk. II B-25C Nr. FR165 NO-K

Base

RAF Melsboek, B

Mission

Raid on Geldern, Germany

Status

KIA, aircraft collided with Mitchell FW212 in mid-air. Time approx. 15:20h.

age

28

Killed

9/2/1945

Place

Tienen, B

Buried

Initially buried in Fosses-la-Ville American Temporary Cemetery, grave F/7/124, as unknown X-149. Reburied British War Cemetery, Leopoldsburg, B, grave VIII/B/1

Known to

OGS

yes

CWGC

no

Other crew

1. Res 2Lt Vl Wnr J.H. Maas, Pilot - safe

2. Res 2Lt Wnr ML G. Claassen, Copilot/Nav - safe

4. Sgt Vltg Sch MLD H. Harsevoort, Ag - KIA

Remarks

Married with Mrs M. Born-Coulthard of Raffles, Carlisle, Cumberland, GB

Memorial

None known

GB arrival

On 20/8/1943 D.H.J. Born had been in a tight spot with the Nienhuis-Oele-Prinsen crew. During an attack on a Dornier aircraft factory at Vlissingen, Holland, their Mitchell FR147 had received a Flak hit in the port engine. The aircraft had to be ditched in the North Sea. The men were safe in a dinghy, that was spotted by Allied fighter aircraft. They floated for 2.5 hours, until the fighters had directed a Walrus floatplane to their rescue.

Telegram to Born's wife reporting his death. Source: @St.M.Vl.P. 1939-50 Born DHJ telegram rvb.jpg


Name

4. Harsevoort, Hendrik

H. Harsevoort Source: @St.M.Vl.P. 1939-50 Loenen 041030 Harsevoort

Rank

Sgt Vltg Sch MLD, Sgt., Ag

Stb.Nr. 11927/Z

Decorations

None known

Born

24/6/1918

Place

Assen, NL

Squadron

RAF 320 (Dutch) Sqn Bomber Command

Ops/hr

Aircraft

Mitchell Mk. II B-25C Nr. FR165 NO-K

Base

RAF Melsboek, B

Mission

Raid on Geldern, Germany

Status

KIA, aircraft collided with Mitchell FW212 in mid-air. Time approx. 15:20h.

age

26

Killed

9/2/1945

Place

Tienen, B

Buried

Initially buried in Fosses-la-Ville, between Namur and Charleroi, Belgium. Reburied at Ereveld Loenen, grave E/1057. However: see data confusion below.

Known to

OGS

yes

CWGC

no

Other crew

1. Res 2Lt Vl Wnr J.H. Maas, Pilot - safe

2. Res 2Lt Wnr ML G. Claassen, Copilot/Nav - safe

3. Sgt Vltg Sch MLD D.H.J. Born, Ag - KIA

Remarks

Memorial

Ereveld Loenen, Gelderland, NL, 'grave' E/1057

GB arrival

Data confusion

Geldhof (3): his remains were not found. He is memorated with a stone on Ereveld Loenen, Gelderland, NL. We could not get this confirmed, but Geldhof may well be right. The Loenen headstone is a memorial.

OGS: Buried Ereveld Loenen, Gelderland, NL, grave E/1057

2. Mitchell Mk. II B-25C FW212 NO-J

Name

1. Manschot, Adriaan

A. Manschot Source: SLHRusthof 040807 Manschot

Rank

Off Vl 2kl, P/O., Pilot

Decorations

Bronzen Kruis, Vliegerkruis, OHK

Born

10/5/1916

Place

Jaarsveld, NL

Squadron

RAF 320 (Dutch) Sqn Bomber Command

Ops/hr

Aircraft

Mitchell Mk. II B-25D Nr. FW212 NO-J

Base

RAF Melsboek, B

Mission

Raid on Geldern, Germany

Status

KIA, aircraft collided with Mitchell FR165 in mid-air. Time approx. 15:20h.

age

28

Killed

9/2/1945

Place

Tienen, B

Buried

Initially buried in Fosses-la-Ville American Temporary Cemetery, grave F/7/122, as unknown X-147. Reburied 29/11/1946 at Algemene Begraafplaats Rusthof, Amersfoort, NL, grave 12/101/E

Known to

OGS

yes

CWGC

no

Other crew

2. Off Vl 3kl A.K. Knapp, Copilot/Nav - KIA

3. Off Zwnr 2kl T.M. Emous, Nav/Ag - KIA

4. Sgt Vltg Telegr MLD A.L. Diets, Wop/Ag - KIA

5. W/O. R.M. Wilson, GEE-H operator - KIA

Remarks

Manschot managed to leave the aircraft after the crash, but was found dead on the ground, with his parachute only partially opened.

Text on cross in Fosses-la-Ville: A. Manshott Dutch

Vliegerkruis, 13/7/1944

Gedurende geruimen tijd bij het 320e Squadron R.D.N.A.S. van Onzen Marine Luchtvaartdienst in het Vereenigd Koninkrijk, in oorlogsvluchten tegen den vijand blijk gegeven van moed, bekwaamheid, volharding en plichtsbetrachting.


Memorial

None known

GB arrival

Trained at JAAB, USA, and send to GB

A. Manschot end 1944. The uniform shows the batons of Bronzen Kruis, Vliegerkruis, and OHK. Source: @St.M.Vl.P. 1939-50



Name

2. Knapp, August Karel (Guus)

A.K. Knapp Source: SLH Loenen 041030 Knapp

Centre: A.K. Knapp as Ltz 3kl MLD KMR SD. SD is Speciale Diensten, Special Services. Source: @St.M.Vl.P. 39-5

Rank

Off Vl 3kl, P/O., Copilot/Nav

Stb.Nr. 20463

Decorations

Vliegerkruis

Born

11/4/1915

Place

Padang, Sumatra, NEI

Squadron

RAF 320 (Dutch) Sqn Bomber Command

Ops/hr

Aircraft

Mitchell Mk. II B-25D Nr. FW212 NO-J

Base

RAF Melsboek, B

Mission

Raid on Geldern, Germany

Status

KIA, aircraft collided with Mitchell FR165 in mid-air. Time approx. 15:20h.

age

29

Killed

9/2/1945

Place

Tienen, B

Buried

Initially buried in Fosses-la-Ville, between Namur and Charleroi, Belgium. Reburied at Ereveld Loenen, Gelderland, NL, grave E/1058. But see Data confusion below.

Known to

OGS

yes

CWGC

no

Other crew

1. Off Vl 2kl A. Manschot, Pilot - KIA

3. Off Zwnr 2kl T.M. Emous, Nav/Ag - KIA

4. Sgt Vltg Telegr MLD A.L. Diets, Wop/Ag - KIA

5. W/O. R.M. Wilson, GEE-H operator - KIA

Remarks

Vliegerkruis, 26/5/1944

Gedurende geruimen tijd bij het 320e Squadron R.D.N.A.S. van Onzen Marine Luchtvaartdienst in het Vereenigd Koninkrijk, in oorlogsvluchten tegen den vijand blijk gegeven van moed, bekwaamheid, volharding en plichtsbetrachting.

Memorial

Ereveld Loenen, Gelderland, NL, 'grave' E/1058

GB arrival

Data confusion

Geldhof (3): his remains were not found. He is memorated with a stone on Ereveld Loenen, Gelderland, NL. We could not get this confirmed, but Geldhof may well be right. The Loenen headstone is a memorial.

OGS: buried Ereveld Loenen, Gelderland, NL, grave E/1058.


Name

4. Diets, Armand Lodewijk

A.L. Diets Source: SLH Loenen 041030 Diets

Rank

Sgt Vltg Telegr MLD, Sgt., Wop/Ag

Stb.Nr. 20391

Decorations

Vliegerkruis

Born

3/6/1923

Place

Makassar, Celebes, NEI

Squadron

RAF 320 (Dutch) Sqn Bomber Command

Ops/hr

Aircraft

Mitchell Mk. II B-25D Nr. FW212 NO-J

Base

RAF Melsboek, B

Mission

Raid on Geldern, Germany

Status

KIA, aircraft collided with Mitchell FR165 in mid-air. Time approx. 15:20h.

age

21

Killed

9/2/1945

Place

Tienen, B

Buried

Initially buried in Fosses-la-Ville, between Namur and Charleroi, Belgium. Reburied at Ereveld Loenen, Gelderland, NL, grave E/1058. But see Data confusion below.

Known to

OGS

yes

CWGC

no

Other crew

1. Off Vl 2kl A. Manschot, Pilot - KIA

2. Off Vl 3kl A.K. Knapp, Copilot/Nav - KIA

3. Off Zwnr 2kl T.M. Emous, Nav/Ag - KIA

5. W/O. R.M. Wilson, GEE-H operator - KIA

Remarks

Trained at JAAB, USA

Vliegerkruis, 21/12/1944

Gedurende geruimen tijd bij het 320e Squadron R.D.N.A.S. van Onzen Marine Luchtvaartdienst in het Vereenigd Koninkrijk, in oorlogsvluchten tegen den vijand blijk gegeven van moed, bekwaamheid, volharding en plichtsbetrachting.

Memorial

Ereveld Loenen, Gelderland, NL, 'grave' E/1058

GB arrival

Data confusion

Geldhof (3): his remains were not found. He is memorated with a stone on Ereveld Loenen, Gelderland, NL. We could not get this confirmed, but Geldhof may well be right. The Loenen hedstone is a memorial.

OGS: buried Ereveld Loenen, Gelderland, NL, grave E/1058.


Name

5. Wilson, Robert Maxwell (British)

Leopoldsburg 050710 Wilson RM

Rank

W/O., GEE-H operator

RAF 1292035

Decorations

None known

Born

Place

Squadron

RAF 320 (Dutch) Sqn Bomber Command

Ops/hr

Aircraft

Mitchell Mk. II B-25D Nr. FW212 NO-J

Base

RAF Melsboek, B

Mission

Raid on Geldern, Germany

Status

KIA, aircraft collided with Mitchell FR165 in mid-air. Time approx. 15:20h.

age

22

Killed

9/2/1945

Place

Tienen, B

Buried

Initially buried in Fosses-la-Ville American Temporary Cemetery, grave F/5/91, as unknown X-146. Reburied British War Cemetery, Leopoldsburg, B, grave VIII/B/2

Known to

OGS

yes

CWGC

yes

Other crew

1. Off Vl 2kl A. Manschot, Pilot - KIA

2. Off Vl 3kl A.K. Knapp, Copilot/Nav - KIA

3. Off Zwnr 2kl T.M. Emous, Nav/Ag - KIA

4. Sgt Vltg Telegr MLD A.L. Diets, Wop/Ag - KIA

5. W/O. R.M. Wilson, GEE-H operator - KIA

Remarks

Son of William Maxwell Gunn Wilson and Margaret Elsie Wilson, of Wallington, Surrey. Source: CWGC

Memorial

None known


Name

3. Emous, Thijs Martinus

Th.M. Emous Source SLH Rusthof 040807 Emous

Rank

Off Zwnr 2kl, P/O., Nav/Ag

Decorations

Vliegerkruis

Born

5/7/1915

Place

Amsterdam, NL

Squadron

RAF 320 (Dutch) Sqn Bomber Command

Ops/hr

Aircraft

Mitchell Mk. II B-25D Nr. FW212 NO-J

Base

RAF Melsboek, B

Mission

Raid on Geldern, Germany

Status

KIA, aircraft collided with Mitchell FR165 in mid-air. Time approx. 15:20h.

age

29

Killed

9/2/1945

Place

Tienen, B

Buried

Initially buried in Fosses-la-Ville American Temporary Cemetery, grave F/7/123, as unknown X-148. Reburied 29/11/1946 at Algemene Begraafplaats Rusthof, Amersfoort, NL, grave 12/101/C

Known to

OGS

yes

CWGC

no

Other crew

1. Off Vl 2kl A. Manschot, Pilot - KIA

2. Off Vl 3kl A.K. Knapp, Copilot/Nav - KIA

4. Sgt Vltg Telegr MLD A.L. Diets, Wop/Ag - KIA

5. W/O. R.M. Wilson, GEE-H operator - KIA

Remarks

Text on cross in Fosses-la-Ville: F.M. Emous Dutch

Married with Mrs A.R. Emous-Rebbes of Porto Rico

Vliegerkruis, 10/8/1944

Gedurende geruimen tijd bij het 320e Squadron R.D.N.A.S. van Onzen Marine Luchtvaartdienst in het Vereenigd Koninkrijk, in oorlogsvluchten tegen den vijand blijk gegeven van moed, bekwaamheid, volharding en plichtsbetrachting.

Memorial

None known

GB arrival

Trained at JAAB, USA, and send to GB


3. Identification of the casualties

Born, Emous, Manschot and Wilson were declared identified by the Graves Registration and Enquiry unit of the British Army on May 11th, 1946.

Source: CAD-MvD 5.050.5220/191

Note that the headstones of Diets, Harsevoort and Knapp carry the text 'In memoriam'. That is a common phrase on graves of Dutch civilians, but not on Dutch military graves. Other headstones in ereveld Loenen do not carry that text. This may mean that Nico Geldhof (3) is right in stating that these are Memorials only, as the bodies of these three aviators have not been found. We could not get this confirmed. We consider the headstone texts as strong indicators that these are not graves but Memorials.

This technically places these three men in the missing-in-action category. Considering the facts that the two aircraft came down in a populated area, that only one parachute (Manschot's) has been seen, that the aircraft carried their full bomb load, and that at least one of the aircraft has been described as exploding upon impact, there is no point now in trying to find their bodies. We have to assume that the bodies were fragmented to bits in the crashes and/or blasts. Technology of the time did not allow for identification of these fragments. We like to believe that what little remained of these men, has in fact been buried together with the remains of the crew that could be identified: Th.M. Emous, D.H.J. Born and R.M. Wilson. Manschot's body was found outside of the wreck of his aircraft.

4. Eyewitness accounts

Fortunately we have quite a few accounts from eyewitnesses of this crash. First of all from three aviators who were up there, including the two survivors of one of the crashed aircraft. As the crash took place in broad daylight, over a populated area, there are several accounts from eyewitnesses on the ground too.

1. Eyewitness account of S/Lt. Jan Maas

On February 14th 1945 S/Lt. Jan Maas wrote his report about the accident:

From: S/Lt J.H. MAAS, 320 Squadron

To: Officer Commaning, 320 Squadron

Date: 14th February, 1945

Sir,

I have the honour to submit hereunder a report on the flying accident involving Mitchell Mk II, aircraft F.R.165 and F.W.212, both of 320 Squadron, on 9th February,1945.

I was piloting aircraft F.R.165 and Lt MANSCHOT was piloting F.W.212. The latter was the leader of our 'Ivory' formation and I was flying in No.4 position. We were briefed for GELDERN (Germany) and we took off at 14.55 Hrs from runway 300; Lt MANSCHOT made a slight turn to the left and climbing through a lane of clouds. At about the end of this lane Nos.2 and 3 were in formation and I was approximately 200 yards behind. We were still climbing with 180 mph, 500 ft/min. and 90° on the compass. Instead of flying reciprocal and keeping on climbing, the leader preferred to open throttle and climbed with 155 mph, 600 ft/min. and 90° on the compass. The leader did not give any orders to open up and keep on climbing with a certain speed, climb rate and course. Nos. 2 and 3 were wise enough to open upautomatically and I changed my position slightly to the left of the leader and went in the clouds with 170 mph, approx. 300 ft/min. and 90° on the compass. In the clouds we experienced a slight icing and suddenly my control column was smashed out of my hands and the aircraft made two quick rolls to the right. I saw that my starboard wing was knocked-off and both engines were still running. The aircraft stalled and went down in a sharp diving spin. I gave the order to bale-out and did my utmost to get the aircraft out of this spin in order to increase my crew's chances of baling-out. I was lucky in obtaining this and the aircraft went in a flat spin. For some unknown reason my port engine was fully feathered and the starboard engine was still running. When I saw that my Navigator was almost out of the bottom exit, I tried to follow him but I was knocked around and kept on the floor due to the centrifugal force. My second attempt was through the pilot's top hatch but once again I was knocked around. By my third attempt I was lying over the windscreen with my left foot out and my right foot stuck in the cabin. Even when I was lying in this position, I was not blown off; I was kept there by the centrifugal force.

I did not know what to do and out of sheer hopelessness I pulled my ripcord and the next moment I realised where I was - hanging on my parachute. I presume I came out at approx. 2,000 feet and my Navigator, whom I had thought was already out, came out at approx. 1,500 feet. Not long after his escape, the aircraft hit the ground near the village of TIENEN (Belgium) and exploded. We both disappeared in the explosion 'mushroom' but the strong wind blew it away and we could see where we were drifting. By manoeuvering my parachute I missed some high-tension wires and landed approx. 30 yards from them. My Navigator who was hanging on one hook of his parachute, did not see the wires and landed approx. 15 yards from them. We both landed at approx. 15.20 Hrs.

My W/Op and Airgunner did not succeed in baling-out and blew up with the aircraft. The body of the W/Op was found near the crater, which was caused by the crashing aircraft plus bombs. Local American M.P.'s helped us to a great extent and brought us to our Base, where we arrived atabout 17.30 Hrs.

The crew of Mitchell a/c F.R.165 were as follows:-

------ S/Lt J.H. MAASPilot

------ S/Lt G. CLAASSENNav.B

12899 Sgt. D.H.J. BORNW/Op

119272 Sgt. H. HARSEVOORT Airgunner

J.H. Maas

Shortly before his death Jan Maas recounted events to Rob Venema:

'Tijdens het klimmen zag ik plotseling het toestel van (wat later bleek) Manschot op mij afkomen. Ik had 'm niet eerder gezien daar wij in de wolken terecht waren gekomen. Ik schreeuwde nog: 'Godverdomme klootzak, wat doe je nou'. Voor dat ik kon reageren dmv een ontwijkingsmanoeuvre klapte het toestel van Manschot op mijn voorkant. De klap was enorm. Door de botsing brak mijn rechtervleugel af nadat al eerder de cockpit behoorlijk was geraakt; al het glas was eruit geslagen. We raakten in een draai met als gevolg dat twee bemanningsleden er niet uit konden komen vanwege de cenrtifugale kracht die hen tegen de binnenwand van het toestel drukten. Die kracht moet zo groot geweest zijn dat zij niet in staat waren van hun plaats te komen.

Claasen en ik schreeuwden tegen elkaar 'Eruit, eruit'. Ik zag dat Claasen er via het luik aan de bovenkant eruit kroop/klom en schreeuwde nog 'Jan , eruit'. Je moet je voorstellen dat de cockpit kapot was en het stuurkolom tegen mij aandrukte. Ik probeerde uit mijn stoel te komen maar dat lukte niet, ik zat vast. Ik trok, duwde, vloekte alles gebeurde tegelijk. Ik merkte dat ik vastzat met mijn linkervoer achter het stuurkolom. Het lukte maar niet om los te komen. Plotseling schoot het door mij heen dat misschien als ik aan mijn parachutering trok, ik er misschien door het openen van de parachute eruitgetrokken zou kunnen worden. De cockpitramen waren toch al kapotgeslagen en de wind stroomde met een kracht naar binnen. Ik maakte m'n veiligheidsriemen los,en trok aan mijn parachute. Door de kracht raakte mijn linkervoet en -been los; ik schoot uit mijn laars. Ik dacht: 'Verdomme, als ik straks terugben op Melsbroek dat moet ik die laars betalen'.

Door de parachute werd ik uit het toestel getrokken, gezogen ahw. Ik schoot via het kapotte raam bovenop de romp en schoot spoedig daar van af. En daar hing ik, scheef aan mijn parachute want mijn chute was er niet helmaal ongeschonden uitgekomen. Ik zag dat mijn toestel neerviel en explodeerde. Let wel, dat toen ik eruit sprong we op zo ongeveer 1500 voet waren. Naast het neerkomen van m'n toestel ontdekte ik hoogspanningskabels en dacht nog: 'Verdomme, straks kom ik nog of in m'n brandende kist terecht of ik kom terecht op die hoogspanningskabels'. Maar het geluk was met mij. Ik trok flink aan mijn parachutekabels en plotseling blies een zucht wind mij over die hoogspanningskabels heen. Ik had dus geluk en kwam dus 'veilig' op de grond terecht. Het gebeurde allemaal zo snel, dat ik pas enige tijd later de 'terugslag' ervan ervoer'.

In de gesprekken met Jan Maas verklaarde hij mij dat Manschot zijn snelheid verminderde, iets wat hij ( Manschot ) nooit had mogen doen.

Jan Maas stond en staat bekend als een zeer goed vlieger; hij had al eens eerder een narrow escape meegemaakt tijdens de aanval op 25 oktober 1943. Totaal vloog hij 94 'operations'. In zijn logboek heeft hij een 'Exceptional' kwalificatie.

Source: Rob Venema, 21/2/2005, from conversations with Jan Maas.

Note: Mr. Maas died in the 1990's.

J. Maas (left) and L. Laamens (right) addressed by ZKH Prins Bernhard after reception of the Vliegerkruis, Lasham, 1943. Lasham 1943 by Kloos-1. Source: 8mm footage shot by J.P. Kloos

J. Maas (left) and L. Laamens during reception of the Vliegerkruis Source: @St.M.Vl.P. 1939-50, picture taken from 8mm film shot by J.P. Kloos

2. Eyewitness account of F/O. André Hissink

Mr. André Hissink was Observer, sitting right of pilot Dirk van Dijk, flying the Mitchell left of Manschot's machine on this fatal flight. From his position, he had the best possible view of what happened.

Wat de botsing Manschot/Maas betreft, ik heb die van nabij meegemaakt en gezien. Maas vloog in de nr 4 positie van de formatie, dus achter nr 1 Manschot. De nr 3 positie was ingenomen door de Austaliër John Osterman en zijn crew - allen Australiërs. Maas is in de staart van Manschot gevlogen waardoor grote stukken van de staart afbraken en het vliegtuig onbestuurbaar werd. Ik vloog die dag als vervangend waarnemer met Dirk van Dijk als piloot in de nr 2 positie, dwz links van Manschot. Ik zat in de rechter stoel in de cockpit naast van Dijk en zag dus het gehele drama heel duidelijk. Direct na dit ongeval beval van Dijk de overige vliegtuigen zich op hem te formeren voor de verdere vlucht naar ons doel, als volgt: in geval nr 1 uitvalt neemt nr 2 de formatie over, Osterman schoof in de nr 3 positie rechts van ons, nr 5 ging naar voren en plaatste zich in de nr 2 positie links van ons en nr 6 plaatste zich in de nr 4 positie (waar Maas had gevlogen) achter ons. Wij vlogen dus door in een ruit-formatie van vier vliegtuigen.

Intussen keek ik de twee neerstortende vliegtuigen na om te zien of er nog iemand uitkwam, maar zag geen parachutes, wel de ontploffingen op de grond. Wij waren erg overstuur van wat wij net hadden gezien en van de wetenschap dat 9 man de dood waren ingegaan (pas later hoorden wij dat het Maas en Claassen gelukt was te springen), maar desondanks nam van Dijk de formatie kalm over en gaf rustige orders. Tegen mij zei hij: 'Jij moet ons nu naar het doel brengen en de bomaanval leiden'. Ik antwoordde dat ik dat onmogelijk kon doen want het doel was overdekt met wolken en ik bezat geen GeeH detailes nodig voor blind bombarderen, die waren met de GeeH operator in Manschot's kist verloren gegaan. 'Dan doe je het maar op DR want wij hebben een opdracht te vervullen', zegt van Dijk. Wij hadden natuurlijk voor vertrek een briefing gehad voor deze vlucht (hoogte, route , wind, weer boven doel, te verwachten Flak, enz). Ik had de nodige kaarten, wist waar de Flakkanonnen opgesteld waren en gaf de nodige koerswijzigingen aan van Dijk om ze te omzeilen. Dit is een belangrijke taak van de leidende waarnemer want om buiten bereik van de granaten te blijven kan niet rechtuit gevlogen worden, maar moet een formatie (of een vliegtuig alleen) zonder ophouden van koers en hoogte veranderen, terwijl altijd wetend waar je precies bent en om hoe laat je je doel bereiken zal. Op het berekende tijdstip maakte ik de bombingrun en lieten onze vier vliegtuigen de bommen tegelijk los. M.i. was het Maas die de botsing veroorzaakte.

Source: André Hissink, email 16/3/2005

Wat Tienen betreft het volgende. Ik was me niet bewust waar de vliegtuigen neer kwamen, heb daar nooit bij stil gestaan waarschijnlijk omdat het erg genoeg was om het te zien. Ik had wat moeite om Tirlemont op de kaart te vinden voordat ik besefte dat de Vlaamse naam Tienen is. Inderdaad ESE van Melsbroek. Dit verbaast mij eigenlijk niet; ook niet dat de stadsarchivaris een westerlijke koers beschreef.

Op de briefing voor een operationele vlucht wordt de startvolgorde van de squadrons en hun individuele formaties gegeven. De codenamen van de 320 formaties (6 vliegtuigen elk) waren Silver Box en Yellow Box en meestal ging Silver Box eerst. Op het gegeven tijdstip rollen de vliegtuigen in de gestelde volgorde achter elkaar naar de startbaan en starten zonder onderbreking, de een na de andere zodra het voorgaande vliegtuig los is (soms 36 totaal!). In de lucht begint het formeren meteen in de buurt van de thuisbasis om vijandelijk gebied of acties te vermijden. Als dit dichtbij is, zoals bij Melsbroek, dan gebeurt het formeren in grote, trage circels en het is dus mogelijk dat toen de botsing plaatsvond wij ons ietwat zuidelijk van de geplande route bevonden en in een westerlijke richting vlogen. Ik kan dit niet met zekerheid zeggen, want ik herinner het mij niet meer ofschoon het mij wel logisch voorkomt. Ik vloog die dag met Van Dijk in de nr 2 positie naast Manschot in nr 1 positie. Wij waren al gauw naast hem, spoedig gevolgd door nr 3 (Osterman). Ik kon de anderen niet zien aangezien zij lager achter ons vlogen verborgen door onze rechter vleugel. Maar ik wist dat zij er waren, nr 4 (Jan Maas) achter nr 1 met nrs 5 en 6 naast hem. De afstand tussen de vliegtuigen is bij goed zicht en kalm weer niet korter dan een vleugellengte tussen de vleugeltips; is er remous dan kan het niet anders of je moet verder uit elkaar. Nrs 4. 5 en 6 vliegen ietwat lager dan nrs 1, 2 en 3 en op veilige afstand naar oordeel van nr 4. Er is voor zover ik dit weet nooit door de RAF opdracht gegeven in uiterst gesloten formaties te vliegen. Dat kunnen zij m.i. ook niet gedaan hebben want zij konden de vliegers niet hiertoe dwingen. Wel werd er natuurlijk gezegd, dat hoe geslotener een formatie was, hoe veiliger het en verdedigbaarder het was - en daar waren wij het mee eens.

Op 9 Februari 1945 was het goed weer bij Melsbroek met matige cumulus wolken, te klein en licht voor regenbuien, maar boven het doel (Geldern in Duitsland) was het wolkendek volkomen dicht. Toen de formatie zowat voltooid was naderden wij de basis van de wolken. In zo'n geval vliegt de formatie rechtuit (geen circels, ook niet als de formatie nog niet geheel gesloten is, maar dan wacht je, als dat kan, tot hij voltooid is) en spreidt zich automatisch uit, zo niet op bevel van nr 1, dwz nrs 2 en 3 vergroten de afstand met nr 1, terwijl nrs 4, 5 en 6 achter ons wat lager gaan vliegen ook met grotere spreiding. Al spoedig gingen wij enkele kleine cumulus wolken in en uit waarbij wij zicht op elkaar konden behouden. De volgende wolk echter was groter en dichter, ofschoon niet donker, maar wij verloren wel meteen zicht van elkaar. Ik zat in de rechter stoel van de cockpit en terwijl Van Dijk de koers hield, hield ik een scherp oog uit naar rechts zodat ik Van Dijk meteen kon waarschuwen om hem te smeren bij een onverwachte manoeuvre of verschijning van nr 1 of als wij te dicht bij nr 1 zouden komen. Maar al gauw braken wij door de top van deze wolk met ons en nr 3 in de juiste posities toen plotseling nr 4 uit de wolk naar boven 'schoot' tegen de staart van nr 1 aan, waarvan grote stukken afbraken. De botsing vond dus plaats op het moment dat wij deze wolk uitkwamen. Ik schreef 'schoot' omdat de snelheid van Maas groter was dan die van Manschot. Het is mij een raadsel waarom dit zo was, want Manschot's snelheid en die van ons en Osterman was dezelfde als waarmee wij de wolk ingingen. Ik heb ergens gelezen of gehoord dat Maas heeft gezegd dat Manschot gas had teruggenomen, maar dat kan niet want dan hadden wij ook in de poeier gezeten! De rest heb ik al eerder beschreven.

Source: André Hissink, email 18/3/2005

Wij kwamen net uit de wolkenflarden. Wij (nrs 1, 2 en 3) waren er nog niet geheel uit toen Maas verscheen. Jan heeft gelijk als hij zegt dat je niet de hele tijd uit je raam kijkt naar de anderen omdat er dingen te doen zijn, want dit doet de vlieger om afstand te houden wanneer hij in een formatie vliegt. Maar wij waren nog niet klaar met formeren toen wij de wolken ingingen en ik keek weldegelijk uit mijn raam om, zoals ik al eerder schreef, van Dijk te kunnen waarschuwen om hem te smeren als Manschot wazig zichtbaar zou worden of v.v. Dat ik dus Maas zag is niets verwonderlijk.

Source: André Hissink, email 23/3/2005

Feedback van Jan Kloos, email 21/2/2005:

Het Maas geval heeft veel geklets gekost. Formatie vliegen wordt in OTU geleerd en daar was het altijd vrij helder dat er een vleugellengte gebruikt zou worden en degene die direkt er onder is, dwz #4, zijn neus onder het eind van de staart van #1 zou houden, en pak weg zo'n tien meter hoogte. Echte formatie afstanden (in boeken beschreven) daar heb ik nooit horen spreken. Het gaat vanzelf dat in de omstandigheden van het Maas incident en degene die ik beschreven heb als box-leader de afstand tussen toestellen groter gemaakt werd maar als de vlieg- instructies streng gevolg waren, en daar zit het in, wie is uit koers of hoogte gegaan ??????

Respons RPh aan Jan Kloos, 21/2/2005:

Dank voor feedback over dat formatievliegen, dit geeft tenminste hand en voet aan de vliegsituatie van destijds:

1. Afstanden waren minimaal - een vleugellengte. In het wegverkeer geldt zo'n 100 meter afstand bij 100 km/u. Anders redt de doorsnee weggebruiker het niet met z'n concentratie- en reaktievermogen. Vrijwel niemand houd die afstand, maar dat is een ander verhaal. Jullie vlogen 400 km/u, op zeg 30 meter afstand van elkaar...

2. Box leader bepaalde de situatie, afhankelijk van de omstandigheden. Ik stel mij voor: als het zicht verslechtert in wolken, dan de linker machine gedurende een bepaalde tijd een paar strepen naar links, de rechter naar rechts, en de middelste rechtdoor, alle met konstante horizontale en vertikale snelheid. Zo zou het moeten werken, en zo zal het ook meestal hebben gewerkt.

3. Afwijken daarvan door de individuele vlieger kan tot rampen leiden. Als dat gebeurt, dan draagt de vlieger die afweek de verantwoordelijkheid.

Dat lijkt volstrekt duidelijk. Toch ben ik er nog niet. Ik ken nu enkele gevallen waarin een kist in een formatie in de wolken van de koers afweek, met een botsing als gevolg. Die vliegers hebben zo'n afwijking zonder twijfel niet expres gevlogen, en het waren ervaren piloten, geen beginners. Zou me interesseren om in die situaties de heersende windrichting te kennen. Kan wellicht nog via het KNMI worden achterhaald. Waar zit de magneet, waarmee die botsingen kunnen worden begrepen? Ik moet de vraag stellen, omdat we zitten met 30% botsingen onder de fataal afgelopen vliegongelukken. Dat percentage is veel te groot om af te doen als werkelijk ongeval, door toeval of door onoplettendheid van een individuele vlieger veroorzaakt.

3. Eyewitness account of Sgt. Gerard Claassen

As told by his son, Mr. André Claassen.

Mijn vader heeft ruim 2 jaar geleden zijn verhaal éénmalig aan mij verteld, en zal u daarom niet antwoorden. De herinnering aan het ongeluk 60 jaar geleden roept de nodige emoties op, waarbij u moet denken aan het verlies van kameraden tot en met het letterlijk overleven aan een zijden draadje, zijnde zijn parachute. Hij wil persé niet meer over dit onderwerp spreken, en laat het bij die ene keer.

Wat ik u kan vertellen, is dat mijn vader niet heeft kunnen zien wat er gebeurd is. Hij zat op zijn navigator-stoel, en voelde plots een klap. Daarna kwam de Mitchell in een spin terecht, waarbij Maas zijn bemanning sommeerde het toestel te verlaten. Door de klap werd hij alle kanten uit gesmeten en werd uiteindelijk door de centrifugale kracht tegen de wand aangedrukt. Met zeer veel moeite kon hij het luik bereiken en heeft hij het toestel kunnen verlaten. Dit in schril contrast tot wat Hissink beschrijft. Pas op de grond gekomen, realiseerde hij zich wat er gebeurd was. Er was vooraf aan het ongeval toen ze het wolkendek invlogen, geen radiocontact met de leider Manschot. Dat is zijn herinnering.

Een bemanningslid van een ander toestel, inmiddels overleden en mijn vader herinnerde zich zijn naam ook niet meer, heeft mijn vader het volgende verteld. Hij zag op enige afstand het toestel van Maas tegen de buik van Manschot botsen, waarna beiden vliegtuigen omlaag doken en nogmaals botsten. Eén of beide toestellen vlogen in brand. Deze getuige kon door gaten in het wolkendek de twee toestellen naar beneden zien storten, maar zag geen parachutes. Tot zover de getuigenissen van deze twee aanwezigen/ooggetuigen.

Source: André Claassen, emails 29 & 30/3/2005

4. Local eyewitness accounts

Van één toestel staat vast dat het neerkwam in de huidige Houtemstraat. Nu is het een bebouwde wijk, maar tijdens de oorlog was dat nog landbouwgebied. De preciese plaats zou, aldus oudere inwoners, net achter het Stedelijk Ziekenhuis geweest zijn. Dat ziekenhuis werd na 1950 gebouwd en staat te midden een uitgestrekt met gras bezaaid terrein.

Source: Pieter Dewever, Tienen, email 12/3/2005

Fons Bottin uit Tienen, beweerde vier, vijf maanden geleden het vliegtuig daar 'gezien' te hebben, en ook 'dat de hele bemanning was omgekomen.'

Source: Pieter Dewever, Tienen, email 13/3/2005

Dat zou deze crash tot het toestel van Manschot maken.

Historicus dr. Luc Vandeweyer (verbonden aan het Legermuseum te Brussel) ontdekte over 9.02.45 deze getuigenis in het Tiense stadsarchief:

'Heden namiddag enige minuten voor half vier wordt onze stad opgeschrikt door twee zware ontploffingen met een minuut tussenpoos. Reeds bij de eerste sprongen veel ruiten stuk in de stad doch op de tweede was het op zekere plaatsen een erge verwoesting. Men beweert dat er een groep van 40 alliée vliegeniers om half vier over de stad passeerden komende van noord-oost en zeer laag vliegend naar zuid-west, dat een der achterste vliegers een botsing gehad heeft met een andere. Wat er ook van zij, vele inwoners hebben de vlieger draaikolkend zien evolueren in de hoogte, parachutes uitwerpen van personeel dat zich wou redden. De vliegtuigen kwamen neer in vlammen achter de Kabbeekvest. Tussen de duizenden brokken vond men minstens twee verhakkelde lijken. Honderden ramen waren aan diggelen en vooral bij de Kabbeekvest en de Linterse poort waren tal van huizen waarvan de daken en plafonds ingedrukt waren. Het getal ruiten overal gesprongen is ontelbaar. De aandoening bij de bevolking was dan ook aangrijpend.'

Deze notitie komt uit het dagboek van Tiens haarkapper en stadsbeiaardier Jan Wouters. Dat 'achter de Kabbeekvest' komt overeen met de huidige Jan Houtemstraat. Jan Wouters was ook de stadsarchivaris. Hij schreef een kroniek over Tienen in oorlogstijd. Hij overleed in de jaren zestig.

Source: Pieter Dewever, Tienen, email 13/3/2005

Pieter Dewever, uitgever en publicist in Tienen, verspreidde een oproep aan ooggetuigen in de pers in België, onder meer via VRT Radio 2 - Omroep Brabant, de officiële Vlaamse radio-omroep met een groot bereik en een groot publiek. De volgende dag, 5/4/2005, verscheen de oproep eveneens in Het Laatste Nieuws, de krant met de grootste oplage in Vlaanderen. En er was respons.

Hieronder samenvattingen van gesprekken met ooggetuigen in Tienen, gehouden in april 2005. Velen hebben gruwelijke details verteld van het verzamelen van menselijke resten, die verspreid bij de plaatsen van inslag werden aangetroffen. Die details laten we uit de verslagen hieronder weg.

Maria Casters, Tienen, destijds 15 jaar: Eén toestel kwam neer aan de Waaibergstraat, bij de derde kastanjeboom die daar toen stond. Nu is er gebouwd de Katholieke Normaalschool. Het ouderlijk huis van Mw. Caspers stond daar vlakbij. Ze had een jaar eerder haar moeder door oorlogsgeweld verloren. Direkt na de crash heeft ze gesproken met Maas en Claassen, die vlak bij het wrak van hun toestel waren geland. De vliegers stonden op hun benen te trillen. Een van hen omhelsde haar. Hun namen hoorde ze vandaag voor het eerst, maar ze wist dat het Nederlanders waren.

Mw. Casters heeft gezien hoe het andere toestel stuurde naar een veld net buiten de bebouwde kom. Volgens Mw. Casters wist deze piloot welbewust een ramp te voorkomen, die zou zijn gebeurd als zijn machine op de bebouwing terecht was gekomen. Het toestel kwam neer op de plaats waar nu Park Nieuwenhoven, een flatgebouw, staat aan de Albertvest. De kist explodeerde op de grond. Er was veel materiële schade in Tienen, maar geen letsel bij de burgers.

Volgens Mw. Casters was er na de oorlog sprake van om de moedige piloot te eren met een straatnaam in Tienen. Dat is er niet van gekomen. Wellicht komt er een tweede kans.

Roger Pijpops, Bosbergstraat, Langdorp, destijds 12 jaar. Hij heeft de botsing van de vliegtuigen niet gezien, maar hij heeft wel de knal gehoord die dat gaf. Hij garandeert dat er een Thunderbolt jager van boven op een Mitchell is gedoken. Er waren meer jagers boven de Mitchells, dat was hun escorte. De Mitchell ging in een spiraal steil naar beneden. Een parachute werd gegrepen door de staart van de Mitchell, en de vlieger bleef daar vastzitten. Het jachttoestel is ook in de grond gedoken, Molenveld, nu het Viandradomein, en hij vermoedt dat de motor daar nog in de grond zit. Het toestel explodeerde, en Dhr. Pijpops vermoedt dat de jager bommen bij zich had. Een propellor kwam terecht op de Grote Markt in het centrum van Tienen. Er was enige bewolking, maar het zicht was vrij goed.

Felix Hermans, Oorbeeksesteenweg, Tienen, destijds 15 jaar. Hij heeft de botsing zien gebeuren. Een jager dook van boven op de rechtervleugel van een viermotorige bommenwerper. Een stuk van de vleugel brak af, en de bommenwerper kwam in een spiraal naar beneden. De jager vloog weg, met een rookpluim achter zich aan, in de richting van St. Truiden. Die jager heeft hij niet zien neerstorten. Brokstukken van de bommenwerper kwamen terecht in het Scoutslokaal. Daaronder delen van de vliegers, en dat was afschuwelijk om te zien. Een ander deel van het vliegtuig viel door het dak van een huis aan de Houtemstraat. Hij heeft een valscherm gezien, vastgehaakt aan de staart van de bommenwerper. De inslagplaats werd door US militairen afgezet, mede omdat boordmunitie in de vuurzee bleef ontploffen. Er waren enkele kleine wolkjes, maar alles was heel duidelijk te zien. De suggestie dat dat viermotorige toestel wellicht twee tweemotorige Mitchells waren, wordt door hem niet aanvaard. Het was duidelijk een enkel toestel met vier motoren. Dat de piloot de stad zou hebben gered, is volgens hem onzin, want met slechts één vleugel is een vliegtuig onbestuurbaar.

Rémy Tomboy, Wissenakenstraat, Tienen, destijds 16 jaar. Hij stond niet meer dan 200 meter van de plaats van inslag in het Houtemveld, bij de Houtemstraat. Ook hij zag een jachtvliegtuig dat een bommenwerper raakte. Dit jachtvliegtuig ging na de botsing recht naar beneden. US soldaten, gelegerd in de Provinciale Normaalschool, hebben geprobeerd om de vlieger te redden. Ze hebben een stok gebruikt om te proberen om het vermorzelde lichaam eruit te halen. Dat was hopeloos, en het wrak stond in brand. De bommenwerper kwam ook naar beneden. Boven de stad vloog het vliegtuig rechtop. De piloot heeft de stad gered door in een cirkelbeweging van het centrum weg te vliegen. Er was een klein wolkske, maar het zicht was verder goed.

Mw. Coenen, Vianderstraat, Tienen, destijds 14 jaar. Ze bevestigt het Houtemveld als plaats van inslag. Haar broer vond in de tuin van het ouderlijk huis aan de Vianderstraat een ongeopende parachute. Die hebben ze verstopt, en van het 'nylon' zijn bloeses gemaakt. Er is er geen van over.

André Van Oyen, Oplintersesteenweg, Tienen, destijds 17 jaar. Hij was tijdens de botsing in de Provinciale Normaalschool, op de hoek van de Veldbornstraat en de Kabbeekvest. Hij heeft gesproken met een overlevende die hem, met de parachute onder de arm, vroeg 'Zijn al mijn kameraden dood?'. Hij situeert wrakstukken aan Viandra (Molenveld) en aan kruispunt Oplintersesteenweg met Vest. Aan Viandra was het lichaam van een vlieger gevonden.

Emile Defau, destijds 17 jaar, weet zeker dat hij vier of vijf parachutes heeft gezien. Een vlieger zat met de parachute aan de staart van zijn toestel vast. Een beeld dat hij nooit zal vergeten. Zijn waarneming was vanaf het station van Kumtich, op ca. 5 km afstand.

Dhr. Vertommen, Diestersteenweg, Tienen, destijds 12 jaar. Hij heeft gezien dat één vliegtuig was gevallen tussen het Houtemveld en de Oplintersesteenweg, en het andere in de Vianderstraat. Hij bericht dat iemand, mogelijk een oplichter, een kollekte hield om een Monument op te richten. Dat is er nooit van gekomen.

Herman Loozen, Tienen. Hij zag de vliegtuigen van zuidwest naar noordoost gaan. Twee valschermen heeft hij gezien. Langs de Kabbeekvest, ter hoogte van waar dokter Onckelinckx woonde, ontstond er een krater in de tuin. De wrakstukken zijn nadien opgehaald door schroothandelaar Missal. Fruitkweker Reynaers had een voorraad kleine ruiten, en kon deze verkopen aan de velen die glasschade hadden als gevolg van de bomexplosies.

Roland Declercq, Tienen, destijds 16 jaar, destijds en nog steeds wonende Veldbornstraat, zuid van en haaks op de Kabbeekvest. Hij heeft twee parachutes gezien, één een beetje hoger dan de andere. Een toestel kwam neer in het Houtemveld, en explodeerde daar. Bij hem thuis gingen alle ruiten kapot. De gevel moest later opnieuw worden opgemetseld. In de tuin was een propellorblad terecht gekomen. Dat was heel zwaar; hij kon het niet tillen. Hij vond in de tuin ook een .50 patroonhuls. Waar het propellorblad is gebleven, weet hij niet. Mogelijk begraven door zijn vader, die in 1993 is overleden. Hij is gaan kijken bij het Houtemveld. De krater had een eigenaardige vorm, als een emmer met scherpe wanden en een vlakke bodem.

Nestor Kinnaer, Kumtich, destijds 13 jaar, wonende in deelgemeente Bost, zuid van het centrum van Tienen, gepensioneerd onderwijzer. Hij heeft gezien dat een éénmotorige jager in de staart van een tweemotorige bommenwerper is gevlogen. De botsing was hoorbaar, een 'droge slag'. De jager vloog nog horizontaal door, en ging toen in een steile duik. De bommenwerper ging in een spiraal naar beneden. Beiden explodeerden op de grond, de ontploffing van de bommenwerper was veel heviger. Er waren enkele wolken, maar de botsing heeft hij duidelijk kunnen zien. De bommenwerper kwam neer op het Viandra domein, de jager achter de Diestersteenweg. Op het Viandradomein werden menselijke resten verspreid aangetroffen. Zijn ouders hebben na de oorlog de grond waar de bommenwerper neerkwam enige tijd in bezit gehad. Hij heeft geen informatie over gevonden en bewaard gebleven delen van de vliegtuigen.

Mw. Hortsense Ipers uit de Veldbornstraat in Tienen schreef het volgende:

Boven mijn hoofd het egale geronk van een vliegtuig dat zijn vlucht verder zet. Het heeft iets rustgevend, vredigs. Heel hoog hangen mensen in de lucht op weg naar verre oorden. Mijn gedachten dwalen terug naar dat andere vliegtuig heel lang geleden. Ik herinner het mij alsof het gisteren was. Ik was toen zo wat tien jaar. De oorlog 1940-1945 was nog niet ten einde. Het was een zonnige dag. Meestal speelden we dan met de kinderen uit de buurt in de tuin. Maar nu tante Marthe op bezoek was waren we binnen gekomen. Tante bracht altijd een snoepje mee.,vandaar. Ik stond bij het raam en keek naar de overvliegende bommenwerpers op weg naar Duitsland. Meestal telde ik ze. Ik zag een vliegtuig heel hoog schuin boven ons huis, dat een rondtollende beweging maakte. Dat had ik nog nooit gezien. Ik riep mijn tante om naar dat vreemde schouwspel te komen kijken. Gelukkig reageerde zij snel. Ze realiseerde zich onmiddellijk wat er gebeurde en riep: 'Hij valt!' Ze sleurde ons mee de kelder in terwijl ze ons moeder riep die het kleinste kind mee nam en naar beneden stormde. Enkele seconden later werd ons huis dooreen geschud. Er knalden oorverdovende ontploffingen. Even dacht ik dat ons huis zou instorten en dat we dood zouden gaan. Dat was gelukkig niet het geval. Toen het stil geworden was, bleven we nog een tijdje bevend zitten. Mijn tante trok als eerste naar boven om te zien of het veilig was. Het was daar een echte ravage. Een stofwolk van afgevallen kalk, het slot van de voordeur lag in de gang, stukken plafond op de grond. Het raam waar ik even tevoren nog gestaan had, had geen glas meer. Scherven daarvan staken in de tegenover staande muur. Moesten die mij getroffen hebben, dacht ik later, wie weet was ik dan wel blind geweest of alleszins ernstig gewond. Op de zolder vonden we een gebroken balk en de pannen waren van het dak gevallen.

In de tuin lag een stuk van de vleugel van het vliegtuig. Hij had onze perenboom weggemaaid. In het veld achter de tuin was een groot gat. Daarin lag een motor.

Stilaan kwamen mensen op straat. Het bleek dat bijna niemand gewond was. De vliegeniers kwamen allen om. Verhalen van verhakkelde lijken en gevonden lichaamsdelen deden de ronde. Dat vond ik verschrikkelijk voor de vliegeniers die naar verluid het onbestuurbaar geworden vliegtuig nog zo ver mogelijk buiten het centrum van de stad hadden gevlogen. Zo kwam het volledige relaas van het gebeuren stilaan tot stand: twee vliegtuigen waren gebotst en neergestort. Het tweede heb ik niet gezien, want het viel naar het schijnt een heel eind verder, achter de Viandra.

Zelf woonden wij toen op de Oplinterse Steenweg, nr 48. Lang nadien kwamen er bij het spitten in de tuin nog stukjes aluminium boven en zelfs stukjes parachute. Het stuk vleugel werd enkele dagen later opgehaald en een politieman kwam de schade die wij hadden geleden, opschrijven.

Sedertdien begrijp ik beter de paniek van mensen en vooral kinderen in oorlogsgebieden. Het is alsof ik het zelf terug beleef. Met dank omdat wij het allen overleefden.

Source: Mrs. Hortense Ipers, email dd. 14/4/2005

According to Mrs. Ipers, who was only meters away from these occurrences, the aircraft wing & engine came down in the garden of Oplinterse Steenweg No. 48, and not through the roof of a house, as mentioned by others.

It is evident that different eyewitnesses are remembering to have seen different things, especially regarding the events in the air. From these accounts, we can distill the following information:

1. There have been multiple crash sites. At least two for parts of the Maas aircraft, and one for the Manschot aircraft, with one report of an aircraft propellor crashing into the city market.

2. Three eyewitnesses saw a fighter aircraft dive from above into the wing of a bomber. Two saw this alleged fighter, also mentioned as a Thunderbolt, crash vertically into the ground a the Molenveld, now called the Viandradomein. One saw this fighter fly off whilst trailing smoke.

3. Four saw a parachute hooked to the tail of a bomber. One explicitly described the aviator swinging to and fro on the ropes of his parachute attached to his aircraft. A sight he shall never forget. The aviator must have been Manschot.

4. All who were outside at the time report on good visibility, with only a few clouds.

5. Two are amendant that the bomber pilot, after diving down, got sufficient control of the aircraft to circle it away from the city center, thereby avoiding civilian casualties. As Manschot was hooked to the tail of the aircraft, the pilot in control must have been Knapp.

5. Maps of crashes

1. Crash site confusion

Als crashplaats aangegeven: Geldern (Decoratiesite), Tirlemont (OGS), en Fienen (320 site). Geldern is in Duitsland, NO van Venlo, het doel van de vlucht. Tirlemont = Tienen = O van Leuven. Dat scheelt nogal. BAHA, Belgian Aviation History Association, Cynrik De Decker, heeft geen informatie over de plaatsen van de crashes.

Source: Cynrik De Decker, email 31/12/2004

2. Map of crash details

Thanks to eyewitnesses on the ground, the crash sites could be pinpointed. The probable forming-up route, and the aircraft positions, were reconstructed with the help of Mr. André Hissink, who was up there that day, and who had a clear view on the accident. Eyewitness accounts are conflicting as to the heading of the bombers. Their direction may have been West to East over Tienen, as stated also by Mr. Jan Maas. Mr. André Hissink assumes that a large forming-up circle may have been flown, as per the drawing below.

Figure 17. Assumed flight path and known box composition of the Maas-Manschot collision Sources: André Hissink; wind data: KNMI: Maastricht 9/2/1945 WSW 244° 4,6-6,7 m/s (3-4 Beaufort)


3. Map of crash sites reported by eyewitnesses

Map 112. Map of Tienen with crash sites as indicated by the eyewitnesses

6. Analysis of crash circumstances

The Mitchell had a top speed of 275 mph (443 km/h) at 15.000 feet (4.572 m). Cruising speed was 230 mph (370 km/h). Initial rate of climb was 1.110 ft/minute (338 m/min). Service ceiling 24.000 ft. (7.315 m). In 15 minutes the aircraft would reach an altitude of approx. 12.000 ft. (3.658 m).

The report of Jan Maas, written February 14th, 1945, seems highly detailed and descriptive. However, key flying details are missing, and other details cannot be reconciled with accounts from other eyewitnesses. Jan Maas gives 90° (due East) as the course throughout his report. But over Tienen, the box, and many other bombers also in the process of forming up for the same mission, were seen to fly NE to SW, course approximately 225°. He indicates that Manschot climbed with 600 fpm into the clouds, and that he himself lowered his vertical airspeed to 300 fpm. This should have given a substantial increase in vertical distance from his leader Manschot, as desired when blind in the clouds. Maas does not mention any time intervals over which the movements described by him took place. So we are faced with the question how Maas could be so very close to Manschot, under the circumstances described by him. The report seems accurate, but it does not add up. Information is missing. He does not mention a collision with another Mitchell. We need to try to reconstruct.

1. On February 9th, 1945, 43 Mitchells took off for a mission against Geldern. 14 aircraft from 98 Sqn, 12 from 180 Sqn and 17 from 320 Sqn. None of the ORB's mentioned opposition encountered, either from fighters or from Flak.

Source: Squadron ORB's, National Archives, Kew, London.

2. Six Mitchells in a box, coded 'Ivory', still in the process of formation on 15.10 hrs, according to the ORB 15 minutes after take-off. The three leading aircraft, Van Dijk in FR199 NO-M, Manschot (leader) and Osterman in FR145 NO-P, fly at a wing's length distance, approx. 10 meters. The three other Mitchells follow the three leading ones, 10 meters lower, noses almost under the tails of the leading aircraft. Maas leads the rear group, he is flying below the tail of Manschot. This type of formation flying requires a relative flying accuracy of a few meters only. Relative as in relation to the other aircraft. Horizontal airspeed estimated by Maas 155 mph (250 km/h, vertical airspeed 600 feet per minute, course over Tienen 225 degrees SW. Prevailing wind coming from 244 degrees WSW, 4 to 7 m/s. Wind crosses flight path at approx. 20 degrees, not a marked crosswind. Wind data is the average for that day, as measured at Maastricht, the closest weather station of which data is available. Wind conditions over Tienen, at the aircraft's altitude, may have differed. In any case, crosswind does not seem to play a role here.

3. The box encounters clouds. The box leader does not give orders to spread out, or how far to spread out. This is left to the individual aviators; they have quite enough routine to perform as per standing orders. That means left aircraft (Van Dijk) to the left, right one (Osterman) to the right, no changes in airspeed or course after spreading. Through the clouds the box flies a straight line. Same for the trailing three aircraft, that are also to increase the vertical distance to the leaders; they are to fly lower than before. Horizontal and, after spreading, vertical speed and course to be maintained.

Now we have two versions of what happened. 3a is the Maas 1945 version, 3b is the version of Hissink and others.

4a. Out of the blue, FR165 is hit by something, knocking off the starboard wing from the engine outWards. Starboard engine still attached and working. The control column is knocked out of Maas' hands, the aircraft makes two quick right-hand rolls, stalls, and goes into a spin dive. Somehow, and not at the same moment as the impact on the starboard wing, the cockpit sustaines damage too. We may be looking at two separate collisions. In his later report, the cockpit is hit first, then the starboard wing section breaks off. Another one of the aviators up there saw two collisions between the Mitchells.

The eyewitness reports on a fighter diving down on the bombers and causing the collision would explain what Maas describes above. However, we have been unable to produce evidence for these reports. In the Operations Record Books of 98, 180 and 320 Squadron, there is no mention of a fighter cover over the bombers.

Source: Squadron ORB's, National Archives, Kew, London.

Fighter losses, or damages sustained, in either RAF or USAF that day, or the previous and the following, cannot be connected to Tienen.

Sources: Franks, Norman; "Fighter Command Losses of the Second World War, Vol 3, p. 144-145, and Foreman, John; "Fighter Command War Diaries", Part 5, July 1944 to May 1945, and Air Force Historical Research Agency, aircraft crash reports, on http://www.au.af.mil/au/afhra/index.html#reports

As by this time in the War the Luftwaffe was mostly out of commission, it is entirely possible that the Geldern mission was flown without a fighter umbrella. Eyewitnesses may have seen a freak accident involving a single fighter. However, pending evidence such as a fighter aircraft engine in the ground on one of the Tienen crash sites, we shall have to lay these eyewitness reports to the side.

4b. Aircraft travel through clouds for an unknown period of time. Directly on coming out of the clouds, FR165 (Maas) hits the tail of FW212 (Manschot) with its nose section. Maas finds no time to fly an evasive manouvre. Hissink sees Maas fly into Manschot, whilst Maas sees Manschot suddenly coming towards him. Five of the six aircraft were still on the envisaged course, and still quite close together, whilst Maas deviated from that, somehow flying at a slightly higher speed than the rest. Possibly a slightly higher vertical speed, that drifts the nose of the FR165 into the tail of FW212 without Maas being aware of that, as he could not see.

Author has suggested to André Hissink and Jan Kloos that the Mitchell flown by Maas may have picked up that extra speed as a result of entering the slipstream of the Mitchell flown by Manschot, whilst all pilots were blind in the clouds. Response Jan Kloos:

Persoonlijk denk ik niet dat slipstream een invloed gehad heeft want zo dichtbij is de stream nog op motor hoogte: je voelt het op zo'n 50 m of meer afstand als je iets lager bent, gelukkig trouwens want dat was nuttig s' nachts wanneer je niets zag maar....voelde!

Source: Jan P. Kloos, email 19/3/2005

Addition by Marcel Daams:

Aircraft produce two cones of disturbed air. One behind the aircraft in its track, the other directed slightly downWards, as reflected by the wing bottom surfaces. Flying in these cones can be clearly felt, via vibrations in the aircraft. It is considered unlikely that the trailing aircraft would fly faster in this slipsteam, as the slipstream is basically a lot of disturbed air.

Source: Marcel Daams, conversation 21/3/2005

So we have been unable to produce an explanation based in aerodynamics. The prevailing crosswind does not seem to play a role either. That leaves us with human factors and pilot's error as the remaining explanations. The magnitude of the consequences is known: seven men killed. The magnitude of the factor or error needs to be understood too. It just shall not do to assume that the pilot was scratching his back, flying without full concentration. The size of this error may have been a vertical airspeed that was less than a meter per second higher than the vertical airspeed of the other aircraft, for a period of a few seconds. Narrow margins indeed, that would hardly show up on the Mitchell's Vertical Speed Indicator. Narrow margins that would hardly be felt by the pilot's sensory system. The aircraft may have risen 10 meters at a very low vertical speed, that would not be perceived as an acceleration by the sense of equilibrium. A sense that was on its own, not supported with the all-important eyesight. A sense that pilots were taught to ignore, when it is not supported by visual information. When flying blind, always trust your instruments, never trust your senses. So what did the instruments tell Maas?

The instruments to look at in this situation are:

Horizontal airspeed indicator. The FR165 maintained its horizontal airspeed relative to the other aircraft.

Direction indicator. The FR165 maintained its intended course relative to the other aircraft.

Vertical speed indicator. The FR165 did not come out of the clouds with an increased vertical distance from FW212, as should have been achieved after spreading. FR165 should have flown lower than before, not higher.

The FR165 somehow climbed the pre-cloud distance of approx. 10 meters towards FW212. This may have happened in one of two ways. Abruptly for an unknown reason, and no time left to correct as the collision was instantaneous. Or slowly. So slow that the aviators had no feedback via instruments or their own sensory system that this was happening. The Mitchell had a type C-2 Vertical Speed Indicator (VSI), range 0-6.000 feet per minute, located at the bottom of the flight instruments panel. The smallest reading that a B-25 VSI could give is 100 feet per minute (0,5 meter per second). A change in vertical speed would be reported by the VSI quickly, but pilots had to wait for 6 to 9 seconds for the reading to be accurate. The altimeter is too slow and too inaccurate to show a climb of 10 meters. In level flight, the FR165 could have climbed the 10 meters to the FW212 in the clouds in 20 seconds or less, without sensory or instrument information available to the pilot. If the entire box was still climbing with approx. 600 fpm at this altitude, then the readings on the VSI would be less accurate, due to the nonlinear scale of the instrument. At 600 fpm it would be harder to notice an increase to 700 fpm on the VSI dial. Meaning that FR165 could, during a climb in the clouds, have touched FW212 in a matter of seconds, without any information that this was about to happen available to either pilot. If true, then this pilot's error was made by a pilot who had no way of knowing that he may have been making one. To him, all controls looked OK. But his instrument eyes were not good enough to allow for this very tight formation flying when his own eyes could see nothing but instruments, and/or were losing focus in the fog.

Mitchell VSI indicator. Collection Aviodrome, Lelystad, NL

In fact this modest accuracy of the VSI in the bottom ranges led others to replace the instrument with one with a 2.000 fpm range. The picture below shows Mitchell N320SQ of the Stichting Koninklijke Luchtmacht Historische Vlucht during the flight to Duxford on 9/7/2005.



Mitchell B-25 N320SQ, 9/7/2005. VSI exchanged to one with 0-2.000 fpm range. Some of the original instruments were removed, to accomodate modern radio equipment. @ Coert Munk

For obvious reasons, this Mitchell is no longer flown to the extremes of the airframe's capacity. A more modest VSI, with a clearly better accuracy in the lower ranges, makes accurate flying easier.

Figure 18. Scenarios regarding the Maas-Manschot collision

Three flightpath sketches. Top aircraft is Manschot; Maas flies 10 meter lower before the clouds are entered. In all three situations, Manschot and Maas maintained the same course and horizontal airspeed. The horizontal distance is not drawn to scale, and the deck of clouds was not merely a vertical column. The cloud representation serves to show that at one point the aircraft entered a flightpath section with zero visibility, and that they came out of that at another point. In the drawing it is assumed that the box was climbing at its regular rate of 1.000 fpm at this altitude. The box was still forming up, and clouds are best negociated by climbing out of them.

Sketch A shows what should have happened. Before entering the clouds, Maas was to lower his aircraft, so as to increase the vertical distance from Manschot. This would have increased the safety margin, needed because the aviators are blind in the clouds. In sketch A, vertical distance has increased to approx. 40 meters. Bridging that 40 meters whilst climbing at the regular 1.000 fpm would require a very conscious effort of the pilot. It would require a serious increase in engine power, and it would take many seconds.

Sketch B shows the Maas aircraft making a sudden jump. There are two pilot errors involved: the aircraft was not lowered, and there was some sort of control hiccup. Not an atmospheric condition leading to turbulence, as that would have affected the leading aircraft in the same way. Vertical movements could happen at much higher speeds than the regular rate of climb, but over short distances only, not in a sustained way. A control hiccup may have led to a collision in less than a second.

Sketch C shows the Maas aircraft gradually climbing towards the Manschot machine. If the pilot's error of not lowering the aircraft was made, than the aircraft could drift towards the Manschot machine in about 20 seconds, without Maas being aware of that. The VSI would not show this extra vertical displacement, just a bit higher than the vertical speed of the leading machine. If Maas would have lowered his aircraft, then still this vertical travel could have taken place, if the distance through the deck of clouds was long enough.

How can we qualify this accident on the bad luck/pilot's error/human factor-scale?

In this accident we have quite a bit of data from eyewitnesses. It is understood that they may have rendered views that incorporate subjective elements. For their reports they had to dig back sixty years in memory, as the RAF did not bother to interrogate the aviators for an analysis of the accident. Things were highly stressful, happening in seconds only, and the aviators were in the middle of the high anxiety Wartime flying episode. All factors that cannot be expected to add up to a scientific account of what they saw. On the other hand, we are not going to get any better data from any-one. We shall have to make do with what the eyewitnesses have told us, and blend in as much understanding of the prevailing circumstances as we can. We can try to make sense of it all, even when we know that the events cannot be reconstructed and understood with full certainty. We cannot KNOW what really happened, but we can reconstruct what may have been the case.

Was a human factor involved here? That's always a possibility, but we cannot see a condition in which one of the better known human factors could lead to a decrease in the pilot's ability to decide and to act. The human factor involved is that humans cannot see through clouds. Can't blame an individual pilot for that.

Was this pilot's error? It always is, when things go wrong. However, we have argued that this verdict should be differentiated. It may be true, but it may not be the full truth. Error implies that the pilot could have performed better, but somehow did not. This implies that the pilot had all the relevant data, and was in full control. We have argued that pilot Maas may not have had all relevant data. He could not see the other aircraft, and if his aircraft has drifted 10 or more meters towards Manschot, then this may have happened without a message from either his flight instruments or his own sensory system. Given these circumstances, any pilot in the rear formation could have come into the position in which Jan Maas came to be.

Was this just bad luck? Author wishes to take a strong position against so simple an explanation. Author believes that this type of tight formation flying could lead to collisions in a fraction of a second, especially in conditions of zero visibility. The circumstances preprogrammed a clear risk of collision. The circumstances were too inherently dangerous. Spreading in clouds would have to be quite wide, both in a horizontal and in a vertical direction, to obtain a reasonable safety margin that could have prevented this type of accident. Whilst pilots were able to fly to a relative accuracy of a few meters under conditions of good visibility, their aircraft were not rock-steady platforms with supersensitive and accurate flight instruments that could be flown to an absolute accuracy of less than say 20 meters in three dimensions in conditions of zero visibilty. It would be unjust to expect of the pilots to perform beyond the possibilities of their machines. It would be ignorant of the prevailing conditions to classify this accident merely as bad luck. If inter-aircraft distances would have been clearly greater to start with, then chances of colliding would have been clearly lower. Especially in the situation that pilots could not know with any certainty the distance they had to travel blind.

RAF 320 (Dutch) Squadron Mitchell, early 1945, seen from a Mitchell in the box of six, flying 10 meters lower and to the rear. Source: picture taken by Jan P. Kloos




List of Aviator Losses  •  
Table of Contents  •  
Database  •  
Next Chapter

You can lay a wreath on this page to show your respect in an everlasting way.
Add us to your address book. Click here
(To translate into English, first select another language from the drop-down menu, THEN you can select English at the top of the drop-down menu.)

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning we will remember them. - Laurence Binyon

All site material (except as noted elsewhere) is owned or managed by Aircrew Remembered and should not be used without prior permission.
© 2012 - 2021 Aircrew Remembered
Last Modified: 13 April 2021, 18:05

If you would like to comment on this page, please do so via our Helpdesk. Use the Submit a Ticket option to send your comments. After review, our Editors will publish your comment below with your first name, but not your email address.

A word from the Editor: your contribution is important. We welcome your comments and information. Thanks in advance.