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RAF Battle of Britain Consolidated Database
3094+ Entries in Database
Allied Losses Nordic RAAF Losses RNZAF Losses USAAF Battle of Britain Paradie RCAF Archiwum Polish War Graves Runnymede Kracker Luftwaffe
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THIS DATABASE IS CURRENTLY UNDER DEVELOPMENT
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NOTE: KIA = Killed In Action. WIA = Wounded In Action. KIFA = Killed in Flying Accident. = Jewish as per jewishvirtuallibrary.org
Fate In Battle is date of incident between July 10 1940 and October 31 1940. Fate After Battle is date of death after the Battle



The Battle of Britain clasp (worn on the 1939-45 Star – or a silver gilt rosette if medal ribbons only are worn) is restricted to aircrew from 71 defined units
of RAF Fighter Command, Coastal Command or the Fleet Air Arm, who flew at least one operational sortie between 00:01 July 10 1940 and 23:59 October 31 1940.

To see a larger database covering the entirety of WWll, refer to our Allied Losses and Incidents database. This database is the result of research into all known sources of information on the crews which fought the Battle of Britain on the Allied side. It is surprising that for the most significant air battle of WW2, and even after 80+ years, there remains any uncertainty at all about who took part and in some cases, what they did. We have made it our objective to develop this database into a most comprehensive and accurate record which brings to life those heroic deeds. You can help: send corrections and additional information via our Helpdesk.
We believe this database to be among the most useful records extant in terms of its searchability: for example, it is easy to determine all Blenheim crews, or losses on a specific date or the members of a particular squadron.

Readers are referred to the following sites which we have used to cross-check information and we acknowledge and thank them as respected sources for some of the material in this database:
VintageWings.ca: comprehensive listing of artworks
bbm.org: Comprehensive listing of RAF personnel and service records
Wikipedia: Life stories of leading pilots and crew
AircrewRemembered Paradie Canadian Archive Database: 45,000 Service Records of RCAF personnel
AircrewRemembered Allied Losses and Incidents Database: Covering 120,000+ Allied aircrew 1939 - 1945
AircrewRemembered Archiwum: specialist database with details of Polish personnel (in Polish)
AircrewRemembered Kracker Luftwaffe Archive: 31,000 Luftwaffe pilot and crew details
AircrewRemembered LOST: Rob Philips Memorial Archive: Dutch losses in Europe
bel-memorial.org: Comprehensive site on Belgian aircrew


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#NameFirst NamesRankService No.Air ForceCountry of Origin*SquadronsAwardsAircraftVictoriesFate in BattleFate After BattleDateOfDeath**************Notes**************Photo
1 AldwinckleAylmer James MartinusPlt Off83288British601Sqn

Hurricane1Survived war5th April 2005 EnglandBorn 29 March 1911 Mendoza, Argentina. British parents. Educated in South Africa and College of Aeronautical Engineering at Chelsea and Brooklands. Imperial Airways, working on DH86s, Empire flying boats and DH and Bristol aero engines. 25 August 1936 he joined RAF Reserve as an Airman u/t Pilot. December 1937 transferred to the RAFVR. Bristol Flying School at Filton, 15 E&RFTS Redhill from 12th January to 3rd December 1938 and then at 3 E&RFTS Hamble from 8th February 1939. Full-time service 4 September 1939. Posted to 6 EFTS Sywell 8 March 1940. To 9 FTS Hullavington on 13 May. 6 OTU Sutton Bridge on 19 August. Converting to Hurricanes, joined 601 Sqd at Exeter on 11 September. 25 September probably destroyed a Me110. 7 October the probable destruction of a Do215. Posted away from 601 on 2nd November 1940 and four days later joined 605 Sqd at Croydon. On the 15th he attacked a Me109, which dived through low cloud and was not seen again. Later learned that it was from 3/JG26, had landed at Eastchurch with the pilot, Lt. R Schiffbauer, being captured. On another patrol later the same day he probably destroyed a Me109. Posted to 55 OTU at Ouston on 1st June 1941 as an instructor. In October 1941 Calshot in charge of the overhaul of Sunderland flying boats and self-sealing fuel tanks, for use on convoy patrol duties. This move came about because of his pre-war experience with Imperial Airways. September 1942 transferred to the Technical Branch (Engineering) and remained in it until his release from the RAF in 1946 as a Wing Commander. Features in documentary

'Spirits in the Wind'



Book with signature


2 AndersonJohn DenisSgt1052185RAFVRBritish604Sqn

BlenheimSurvived war25th April 2007.There is some confusion between John Denis Anderson and John S Anderson. John Denis is quoted in the Wikipedia list of RAF Personnel Flying in Battle of Britain as belonging to 152 Sqd. However, Battle of Britain records show John Denis to have been with 604 Sqd. There is a John Anderson with 152 Sqd, this would be John Stuart who is known to have been flying Spitfires with 152 Sqd during the period of the Battle but no records have been found linking him to a qualifying operational flight during the required period June - October 1940.

John Denis Anderson was born 22nd April 1922. Joined the RAFVR at No. 3 RAF Depot Padgate on 6th June 1940. After learning airborne radar in late July, posted to 604 Sqd at Gravesend. He had never having flown at this point.. Flew operationally with 604 (County of Middlesex) Squadron AuxAF, firstly in Blenheims and then Beaufighters until December 1940, when he was posted back to Yatesbury for another radar course. January 1941 posted to a radar station at Saligo, Islay, Scotland. Anderson applied for pilot training in September 1942. In September 1943 Anderson began his pilot training but he had still not qualified at end of war. Posted to RAF Atherstone for a Ground Controlled Approach course. To 10 GCA RAF Hemswell in November 1945 as a Flight Sergeant. Commissioned from Warrant Officer in June 1955, Anderson retired from the RAF on 31st January 1973 as a Squadron Leader.


3 ApplefordAlexander Nelson Robin LangleyPlt Off32736RAFBritish66Sqn

SpitfireSurvived war17th April 2012.Born September 1921 in India. One of the youngest fighter pilots who flew with the Royal Air Force during the Battle of Britain. Educated at King's College, Taunton. Training at 12 E&RFTS Prestwick on 8th August 1939. To 11 FTS Shawbury on 26 September 1939 Joining on 13 May 1940 66 Sqd at Duxford on Spitfires. On 4 September 1940 at 09:50hrs. Spitfire I (N9316) had been attacked by Bf 109s over the Thames Estuary. Spitfire, P9316, crashed near Howe Green Farm, Purleigh, Essex. Seven days sick leave. Sometimes attached to 421 Flight. On 17 October 1940 he carried out a W/T test and on 9th November he flew a patrol with 421. Following the Battle of Britain, Appleford was a flying instructor. Posted from 66 Squadron on 13th December 1940, Appleford went to 8 FTS Montrose for an instructors course, after which he was posted to Southern Rhodesia, to instruct at 22 SFTS Gwelo. In 1943 he returned to combat duties with 274 Sqd flying Hurricanes on coastal defence in North Africa. After a spell with the Aircraft Delivery Unit, he went to South Africa as a flying instructor. From early February 1944 until May 1945 Appleford instructed at various Air Schools in South Africa. Returned to Britain on 1st July 1945 and joined 587 Sqd at Weston Zoyland on 24th August. Released from the RAF in August 1946 as a Flight Lieutenant.


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4 AyerstPeter VigneP/O (later Wng Cmdr)RAF73Sqn

145Sqn

243Sqn

33Sqn

238Sqn

124Sqn

DFC
Hurricane, Spitfire5 (some records 9)Survived warMay 15 2014, Beckenham KentAyerst's name does not appear in many records of Battle of Britain participants. Our research shows he participated when a member of training group. Perhaps the fact this unit was not one of the recognized Battle of Britain units is the reason his name is missing from the records

Born 4 November 1920 Westcliff-on-Sea, Essex. Advanced flying training in Lincolnshire in 1939, short service commission to the RAF. He flew Hawker Hurricanes in 73 Sqd which was based in Rouves, northern France, from October 1939 through to the fall of France in May 1940. In October 1939 Ayert became the first RAF pilot to come into combat with a German fighter plane - and that was by accident. While on a patrol over France, at the age of 19, he momentarily flew off in the wrong direction. After a while he found what he thought was the rest of his French squadron and flew in behind the nine planes. He realised however they were Messerschmit 109s after he noticed the black cross of the Luftwaffe on the tail fins. He gave a short burst of fire before diving out of the way. Another 18 Messerschmits arrived as did the rest of his patrol and the first combat of the war broke out. Ayerst said: 'I was the first RAF fighter pilot ever to come into combat with a Messerschmit 109. On that day our squadron were the first offensive fighter patrol of the war. As I was turning around to come back to France, underneath me I saw nine aircraft in line. I thought "here come our boys on this patrol".' I joined in formation, tagged on the end and saw bloody great black crosses. So I pulled up and gave a quick squirt at the enemy and went down. Unbeknown to me there were another 18 of them making 27 altogether.' After returning to Britain he was based in Cheshire, teaching young fighter pilots aerial warfare. During one lesson in August 1940 - the height of the Battle of Britain - his services were called upon when a German Heinkel bomber appeared nearby. He and two other pilots took off and shot the plane down. Years later Ayerst met two members of the German crew who thanked him for helping them survive the war by being captured.

In 1942 he was posted to North Africa and flew Spitfires and Hurricanes, intercepting enemy aircraft. On his 22nd birthday on November 4, 1942, his plane was cut down by German flak and he crash landed on a road. It was too risky to walk across the desert by day to find his squadron, so he waited until dark. Just as he set off an Australian army truck pulled up and an officer told him to get in immediately as he was about to walk through a darkened minefield.

He flew again in the aftermath of D-Day. Wg Cdr Ayerst's biographer, Hugh Thomas, said: 'For Peter to survive through four major air theatres of the war, he must have been a very special pilot. Many pilots could fly a Spitfire but very few could make them dance and that is what Peter could do. I can't think of any other pilots who spent more time in Spitfires other than Peter Ayerst and Alex Henshaw, who was the chief test pilot for Vickers. Peter flew in and tested all the Spitfires, from Mark I to Mark 22.'

He was not only the first RAF fighter pilots to see action in World War Two but was remarkable in seeing action in the Battle of France, Battle of Britain, El Alamein, Normandy landings, Arnhem and offensive sweeps into the Ruhr. The odds against surviving just one of those campaigns were high. Of surviving the entire war, he said: 'One stayed with it, got through it and, if you were lucky, came out the other side.'

In his career as a fighter pilot he destroyed nine enemy aircraft, probably destroyed two more and damaged four.

Biography: Spirit of the Blue



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Canterbury City Cemetery
5 BaderDouglas Robert SteuartSqd Ldr26151British242Sqn (CO)
CBE

DSO

DFC
Hurricane22.5PoW1982-10-05After losing both legs in pre-war flying accident, accepted back for flying duties in Spitfire I in 19 Sqd at Duxford. June 1940, commanded 242 Sqd, only Canadian unit at the time. 242 badly mauled in France, morale low. Bader quickly transformed 242 into a tough unit by his courage, leadership and uncompromising attitude toward his pilots, ground crews and the RAF high command, with whom he soon had a major brush. Bader discovered unit did not have the spare parts or tools to keep its 18 Hurricane fighters operational. Bader signaled 12th Group Headquarters: '242 Squadron operational as regards pilots but non-operational as regards equipment.' And he refused to announce his squadron as operational until its lack of tools and spares was rectified. It took a direct meeting with Fighter Command's commander Air Chief Marshal Sir Hugh Dowding, to correct the mess. Within 24 hours, 242 Squadron had all the tools and spares it needed, and Bader signaled 12th Group: '242 Squadron now fully operational.' Early in 1941 commanded the first Tangmere Wing and his tactics then were carried on by Fighter Command for some years. 1941-08-11 baled out leaving his 'tin' right leg in the Spitfire, and became a prisoner of war for 3½ years, ending it in Colditz Castle after two attempted escapes. Retired from RAF July 1946 and rejoined Shell Oil, later being knighted. In just 15 months operations his official score was 22½ enemy aircraft destroyed (his personal tally was 30!)


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6 BambergerCyril Stanley 'Bam'Sgt810024 (later commissioned with Service No.116515)RAFVRBritish610Sqn

41Sqn

DFC & Bar

Air Efficiency Award

Spitfire6Died2008-02-03Born in Port Sunlight 4 May 1919, joined the RAFVR in 1938. Shot down two Bf 109s from Hawarden and Hornchurch. 1941 volunteered for Malta in Hurricanes with 261 Sqd RAF from Hal Far from late November 1940 and shot down two Junkers Ju 87 aircraft over the Grand Harbour in January 1941. Bamberger joined 93 Sqd RAF in 1942 and was deployed to Tunisia. Commissioned 1942. Volunteered for North Africa and shot down another Ju 87 (Sicily) and damaged another ( Italy - 1943). DFC on 28 September 1943. In Italy he shot down another 109 and damaged another. Promoted to Flt Lt 9 February 1944. 3 July 1945 Bar to DFC at Buckingham Palace from the King. Served in RAF Intelligence during the Korean War.
7 BarberRobert HughPlt OffBritish46Sqn

AFC

HurricaneSurvived war31st March 1998.Born on 19th December 1915 at Hatfield, Hertfordshire England. Educated at Oakham School. Entered the RAF on a short service commission in June 1939. 22 E&RFTS Cambridge he was posted to 12 FTS Grantham in late August. Early 1940 Barber went to RAF Manby for an armament course then in July he was posted to 7 OTU Harwarden to convert to Spitfires. On 15th August he joined 46 Sqd at Digby. On 4th September, acting as tail end charlie (weaver), he was jumped by a Me109 over Rochford. His glycol system was damaged and he was soaked in fluid. He dived from 15000 feet and made a belly-landing at Chigborough Farm, Heybridge. He was admitted to St Margaret's Hospital, Epping, with three fractured vertrbrae in his neck and his jaw broken in three places. He was in hospital for six months. Medical category barred him from further operational flying and he went to HQ 10 Group as an assistant to the Controller. When W/Cdr. AG Malan formed CGS at Sutton Bridge, Barber was one of his first pupils. Commanded Armament Practice Camps at Warmwell, Martlesham Heath and Southend. AFC 1st January 1943. Early in 1944 Barber went to the Gun Research Unit at Exeter, flying with the new gyro gunsight. Gven command of a non-operational Spitfire squadron at Southend, to train pilots on the new sight, including some Americans. Later in the year the squadron moved to North Weald. En routeto Southend in an Oxford the aircraft swung on take-off and crashed. The pilot was killed and Barber went into hospital for several months. He returned to the APC at Warmwell but then joined a Disarmament Group that was about to move to Germany. After a motor accident on a mined bridge and another spell in hospital, Posted to Sylt to set up an APC for Squadron training. Released from the RAF in 1947 and emigrated to New Zealand.

8 BarthroppPatrick Peter Colum 'Paddy'Fg Off41542British602Sqn

610Sqn

91Sqn

122Sqn

DFC

AFC

Spitfire4Survived warDied 16 April 2008One of the RAF's most flamboyant fighter pilots. Born in Dublin on 9 November 1920 on a family visit there. His mother died while giving birth. He was educated at St. Augustines Abbey School, Ramsgate, then St. Josephs College near Market Drayton followed by Ampleforth College, North Yorkshire. As a candidate for a short service commission he began his elementary flying at 13 E&RFTS White Waltham on 31st October 1938. After a short induction course at No. 1 RAF Depot Uxbridge he was posted to 7 FTS Peterborough on 31st January 1939 and completed his training in late July. After a month at No. 1 Armament Training Camp Catfoss, Barthropp went to No. 1 School of Army Co-operation Old Sarum on the day the war started. On 9th October 1939 he was posted to 613 (AC) Sqd at Odiham. Barthropp volunteered to serve in Fighter Command in August 1940. On the 21st he was sent to 7 OTU Hawarden to convert to Spitfires and on 8th September he joined 602 Sqd at Westhampnett. He flew four sorties on the 15th. On the 21st he damaged a Do17, on the 27th shared a He111 and on 2nd October shared a Ju88. Barthropp joined 610 Squadron on 7th January 1941 and on 5th February he went to 91 Squadron at Hawkinge. On 27th April Barthropp damaged a Do17, on 4th June he probably destroyed a Me109, on the 9th he shot down a Me109 and on 17th August he shot down one Me109 and damaged another. On 24th August 1941 Barthropp rejoined 610 Sqd as 'B' Flight Commander. He was awarded the DFC 26th September 1941 and posted to 61 OTU Heston on 23rd October as an instructor.

After ‘resting’ as a flying instructor in Shropshire from October 1941 whilst as ever enjoying fast cars and lively female company and always pushing against 'stuffed shirt' authority, he returned to operations with 122 Sqd at Hornchurch on 15 May 1942, and two days later, whilst escorting six Douglas Boston light bombers attacking a factory, his controls were wrecked by cannon fire from a Fw190 (Focke-Wulf Fw190) near St. Omer, forcing him to bale out, and he was captured upon landing, meeting the pilot who had shot him down that evening. Two days later on Ramrod 33, an escort for six Bostons bombing a factory at Ambleteuse, Barthropp shot down a Fw190. But shortly afterwards his controls were shot away by another Fw190 over Audruicq, near St. Omer. He baled out of Spitfire Vb AR400 and was captured on landing. He escaped twice before being sent to the persistent escapee's prison Oglag XXIB in Poland. Within days he instigated a tunnel breakout.

Paddy Barthropp Bio

Autobiography: ‘Paddy The Life And Times of Wing Commander Patrick Barthropp DFC AFC RAF Ret’d’ originally published in 1987






Portrait by Tony Holt
9 BarwellEric GordonPlt Off77454RAFVRBritish264Sqn

125Sqn

249Sqn

DFC & Bar

MiDr

Air Efficiencyr

Hurricane6Survived war12th December 2007Born 6th August 1913 in Clare, Suffolk England. Educated at Wellingborough School. July 1938 he joined the RAFVR to train as a pilot at Cambridge. Elementary flying at 22 E&RFTS Cambridge. Joined 264 Sqd on Defiants in February 1940 at Manston in Kent during the Dunkirk evacuation. During two patrols on May 29 1940 the squadron was credited with shooting down 37 enemy aircraft. Barwell and his gunner accounted for a Messerschmitt Bf 109 and, on a second patrol, they shot down two Stuka dive-bombers. Two days later they destroyed another Bf 109 off Dunkirk. They also attacked Heinkel bombers that were attempting to bomb the convoy of little ships sailing across the Channel with evacuees. One of the enemy was shot down, but return fire hit his Defiant's engine, causing a leak in the cooling system. When it became obvious that he would be unable to reach the English coast he kept the line of ships in sight - it stretched from the French coast to Kent - and, when his engine seized, he ditched his aircraft between two destroyers. His gunner was knocked unconscious, and Barwell struggled to free him and hold his head above water before they were rescued by HMS Malcolm. His first night-time success was on April 10 1941 when he and his gunner destroyed a Heinkel bomber near Beachy Head and probably destroyed a second. Transferred to Defiant 125 Sqd, as a Flight Commander. Early 1942 the squadron received the Beaufighter. His first combat in the aircraft was on the night of July 1 1942, when he attacked a Dornier bomber; but when his cannon jammed he had to use the less effective machine guns and could claim only a damaged. On the same day he learned that his elder brother Philip, who was the group captain commanding the fighter base at RAF Biggin Hill, had been shot down and killed over the Channel by friendly fighters. After a six-month rest he returned in March 1943 to 125 Sqd, soon on the Mosquito. On the night of April 23 he destroyed a Junkers 88 over Warminster. He flew many night patrols in support of the Allied landings in Normandy, and on June 24 he intercepted another Junkers, which was trying to attack shipping off the mouth of the Seine. He stalked the enemy aircraft for 30 minutes before finally shooting it down. Barwell's final success in the air came on August 10 when he shot down a V-1 flying bomb as it approached the coast of Kent. The following month he was posted to command the experimental squadron in the Fighter Interception Unit, flying the Tempest and Mustang, two of the fastest piston-engined fighters. On promotion to wing commander he took control of night fighter operations at the HQ of the Second Tactical Air Force. He returned to operations in April 1945 and was released from the RAF in September 1945.

DFC Citation: 'This officer has completed a very large number of sorties and his example of keenness, determination and devotion to duty has been worthy of the highest praise. He is a most able flight commander whose untiring efforts have been reflected in the operational efficiency of the formation he commands. Squadron Leader Barwell has destroyed 6 enemy aircraft, 2 of them at night.'


10 BattLeslie GordonSgt145514 (later 741474)RAFVRBritish238Sqn

Air Efficiency Award

Hurricane3Survived warLeamington Spa 2004-02-04Born 27 November 1916. Educated at Bablake School and Coventry Technical College. Joined the RAFVR in April 1938, as an Airman u/t ( under training ) Pilot. Training at No 9 E&RFTS ( Elementary & Reserve Flying Training School ), Ansty. Near Coventry. Called up on September 1, 1939 posted to 6 FTS ( Flying Training School) at Little Rissington on October 9 1939, on No 15 Course. To 10 B & GS ( 10 Bombing and Gunnery School ), Warmwell on May 1940, with the Advanced Training Squadron of 6 FTS, for armament training. July 13th 1940 Batt shared in the destruction of a Bf 110, and on 21st July he shared in the destruction of a Dornier Do17 Bomber, on August 8th he destroyed a Messerschmidt Bf109 fighter and on 13th August he destroyed a Heinkel He111 bomber. 13th August he made a forced landing at Eartham near Tangmere , in Hawker Hurricane P2989 with a damaged oil tank, after an attack by Messerschmidt Bf109 fighters off the Isle of Wight. To Egypt with 238 Squadron in May 1941 and remained with the squadron until December. In February he joined the Aircraft Delivery Unit in Egypt. Returned to the UK in November. He went to 55 OTU ( Operational Training Unit ), Annan, as an instructor in early December 1942 and was commissioned from Warrant Officer in March 1943. August 11 1943, posted to 198 Sqd, flying Hawker Typhoons from Martlesham Heath. He went on a course to 7 FTS ( Flying Training School ) on November 24 1943, after which he was posted to 15 (P) AFU ( Advanced Flying Unit ) Babdown, as an instructor, remaining there until his release from the RAF in 1945 as a Flight Lieutenant.

Notorious for the ‘Bat’ insignia on his aircraft, Batt was called up at the outbreak of war and in May 1940 arrived with 238 Sqd at Tangmere. He was to stay with 238 Sqd throughout the Battle of Britain and served with the squadron in Egypt from May to December 1941. During the Battle of Britain he shared in the destruction of a Do 17 and also claimed a Bf 109 two and a half weeks later. This photograph depicts Batt sitting in his Hurricane Mk 1 P2989 during the Summer of 1940.

11 BennGordon William 'Sailor'Sgt513418British219Sqn

BlenheimSurvived war2nd February 2005Born July 1912 in East Preston, Sussex England. Joined RAF 16 October 1930 as an Aircrafthand aged 18. Posted to a Vickers Vimy bomber squadron at Hawkinge. July 1931 he went to 423 Flight aboard HMS Furious, on Fairey Flycatchers. Transferred in 1932 to HMS Courageous of the Mediterranean Fleet based in Malta. Returned to the RAF in 1933 with the nickname 'Sailor'. 1935 to Ambala in India and joined 28 Sqd under S/Ldr. CJS Dearlove on Westland Wapitis. Changed to a trainee Air Gunner in the RAF’s efforts to suppress tribal unrest on the North West Frontier. In 1937 he moved with the Squadron to Manzi where unrest had been fomented by the Fakir of Ipi. Benn earned an India General Service Medal for this campaign. Returned to the UK in January 1938 and joined 217 Sqd as a Corporal Air Gunner, flying in Ansons. It operated from Tangmere, Warmwell and Carew Cheriton where detachments were engaged in observing submarine activity. Prior to the outbreak of war the squadron was heavily involved in evacuating VIP's from the Channel Islands. At the outbreak of war he was posted to 219 Sqd on Blenheims. On 15 August1940 a major raid was detected approaching the Yorkshire coast from bases in Norway and 219 was scrambled to intercept 42 Ju88’s off Flamborough Head. At about 1300 six Blenheims took off, Benn crewed with Sgt. FG Nightingale in L1240. They engaged one enemy aircraft and set it on fire but had to break away after being attacked by Spitfires. During the ensuing violent manoeuvres Benn was knocked out when thrown around the gun turret. He flew with the squadron throughout the Battle of Britain. Came off operations in 1942 and went to 53 MU Charlwood, a depot supplying bombs to squadrons on a 24-hour basis. In August 1945 Benn went to Singapore with 5353 Airfield Construction Wing, to build metal runways at Changi. After this he joined 314 MU at Seletar, where fourteen RAF men, with the aid of two hundred Japanese PoWs, were dealing with Japanese bombs. Home in 1948, posted to a Radar/Signals Unit at Chicksands, to RAF Luqa in Malta in 1949, returned to the UK in 1952 and was discharged 16 October 1954 as a Warrant Officer.



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12 BennionsGeorge Herman 'Ben'Plt Off43354British41Sqn

DFC
SpitfireDiedCrashed Spitfire I (N3113) at Manston on 1940-07-29 owing to battle damage. Baled out of Spitfire I (X4559) badly wounded on the 1940-10-01 after combat with a Bf 109 over Henfield, Sussex at 14:55hrs.Cannon shell exploded in cockpit, 1940-10-01, blinding him in one eye and wounding his right arm and leg; baled out and hospitalised; underwent plastic surgery at Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead, by facial reconstruction pioneer Dr. Archie McIndoe; became one of the founding members of McIndoe's 'Guinea Pigs'; Born Burslem, Staffordshire, 13 March 1913.
Ben Bennions and his wife Avis and daughter Connie leaving Buckingham Palace after being awarded the DFC by HRH King George VI.
13 BentBenjamin 'Benny'Sgt52078RAFBritish25Sqn

DFC
BlenheimSurvived war4th March 2013.Born on 22 August 1919 at Coatbridge, Scotland. Joined the RAF 8 November 1937 as an Aircrafthand and began a Wireless Operator course at No. 1 Electrical and Wireless School at Cranwell in February 1938. Posted to Biggin Hill on 9th January 1939. June 1940 he volunteered for aircrew duties and joined 25 Sqd at Martlesham Heath on 6 August. Detached to 604 Sqd at Middle Wallop on the 31st for AI training. Rejoined 25 Sqd. Pperational night-flying as an LAC but without a flying badge. On 27 September 1940 he was promoted to Sergeant with the category of Wireless Operator (Air). Assisted in five successful night interceptions, all with S/Ldr. HP Pleasance in Beaufighters. On the night of 4th/5th May 1941 they intercepted and damaged an unidentified enemy aircraft, on the 7/8th and 8/9th two Do17's were destroyed, on the 11th/12th a He111 was damaged and during the night of 13th/14th June a Ju88 was destroyed. Remustered as a Radio Observer on 10th July 1941. To 54 OTU Charter Hall on 29th April 1942 as an instructor. 23July 1942 Bent reclassified as a Navigator Radio and rejoined 25 Sqd, then at Church Fenton, on 8th September 1942. Commissioned from Warrant Officer in April 1943. On 21st March 21 1944 he assisted in destroying two Ju88's and at 00.43 hrs on 6th June a Me110 over the North Sea, possibly the first enemy aircraft shot down on D-Day. DFC 26th May 1944. Served as Night Fighter Liaison Officer in France with a P-61 Black Widow squadron of the USAAF. Released from the RAF on 2 February 1947 as a Flight Lieutenant. Rejoined on 4th October 1950 on a short service commission in the Fighter Control Branch. Granted a permanent commission on 1st April 1952, Bent retired from the RAF at his own request on 5th December 1970 as a Flight Lieutenant.

14 BerryRoland 'Ras'Sgt (later Air Commodore)78538RAFVRBritish603Sqn

DSO

DFC & Bar

CBE

OBE

Spitfire14 (at least)Survived war2000-09 Age 84Joined the RAFVR in 1937. 603 Sqd as a Sergeant Pilot, commissioned in June 1940. Flying in Spitfires during the Battle of Britain shot down 7 confirmed 4 shared and 6 probables. 6 of the confirmed Bf 109s. Riley High School and Hull Technical School. RAFVR April 1937 and did his weekend flying training at 4 E&RFTS Brough. February 1939 he spent three weeks with the RAF and was attached to 66 Squadron at Duxford where he was able to fly the Spitfire. At the outbreak of war, Berry spent a short time at a Gunnery School before joining 603 Squadron at Turnhouse on 17th October 1939. In November sent to Montrose to protect the airfield there. On 7th December the 603 pilots drove off a formation of He111s and damaged at least two. On 30th June 1940 Berry damaged a Ju88, on 3rd July he shared a Ju88, on the 23rd and 30th shared a Do17 and a He111 respectively, on 28th August probably destroyed a Me109 and damaged another and on the 31st he destroyed three Me109s (Air Commodore Ronald ‘Ras’ Berry was one of the RAF’s greatest pilots, racking up more than 30 ‘claims’ on enemy aircraft, including 14 confirmed kills, during the Second World War. On August 31, 1940, at the height of the Battle of Britain, he downed a German Messerschmitt 109 plane either side of breakfast and then a third before dinner). On 2nd September he destroyed a Me109, on the 11th damaged a Me109, on the 15th probably destroyed two Me109s and shared a Do17, on the 17th he probably destroyed a Me109 and on the 27th he destroyed two Me109s, probably a third and shared a probable fourth. On the 29th Berry probably destroyed a Me109 and damaged another, on the 30th destroyed a Me109 and shared another, on 8th October probably destroyed a Me109 and on the 27th and 28th he damaged Me109s. On 7th November Berry shared a Me110, on the 8th damaged a Me109, on the 17th destroyed a Me109 and on the 23rd he shot down an Italian and probably another. These biplane fighters were escorting bombers attacking coastal shipping. January 1941 Berry was 'A' Flight Commander as an Acting Flight Lieutenant. In January 1942 he was given command of 81 Squadron. The pilots had just returned from Russia, leaving their aircraft there. In October the squadron sailed for Gibraltar, where it picked up tropical Spitfire Mark Vcs. 8th November 1942, the day of the landings in North Africa, 81 occupied Maison Blanche airfield, probably the first Allied squadron to land. Next day Berry destroyed a Ju88 and shared in destroying a Ju88 and a He111, on the 11th he damaged another Ju88, on the 14th damaged a Mc200, on the 26th damaged two Me109s and on the 28th shared another. Berry shared a Fw190 on 3rd December, destroyed another on the 6th and shot down a SM79 on the 10th. Appointed Wing Leader 322 Wing on 23rd January 1943. The Wing was made up of 81, 152, 154, 232 and 242 Squadrons. He destroyed Me109s on 31st January and 25th February, got a probable Me109 on 2nd March, damaged a Fw190 on 3rd April, damaged a Ju87 on the 5th, probably destroyed a Me109 on the 13th, damaged Me109s on the 25th and 26th, destroyed a Ju52 on the ground on 6th May and six Me109s on the ground next day. Took command of 322 Wing on 13th March 1943. He commanded RAF Acklington in 1945/46, graduated from the Joint Services Staff College in 1955 and held a series of staff appointments in Fighter and Bomber Commands before his retirement on 29th January 1969 as an Air Commodore.






15 BrothersPeter MalamFlt Lt37668British32Sqn

257Sqn

DSO

DFC & Bar
Hurricane10DiedJoined 32 Sqd in 1936. Destroyed four enemy fighters over France and during the early part of the Battle. Brothers added four more enemy aircraft (of which three were fighters) during the latter half of August. Posted to 257 Sqd early September, he destroyed two Do 17s on the 15th of September. Awarded the DFC on 1940-09-13, Bar to the DFC on 1943-03-15, and the DSO 1944-11-03. Air Commodore in the latter part of the war.


Signed by Pete Brothers, John Ellacombe, Anthony Russell, Derek Yapp

16 BrownMaurice PeterFg Off40796RAFBritish611Sqn

41Sqn

AFC

Spitfire3Survived war20 January 2011Born London 17th June 1919. Educated at Holloway School. Joined the RAF on a short service commission. Flying training started 4th April 1938. In mid-June to 5 FTS Sealand, wings in September. Posted to No. 1 Electrical and Wireless School at Cranwell in January 1939 as a staff pilot. On 21st September joined 611 Sqd at Duxford. During the winter of 1939/40 flew convoy patrols, losing several pilots because of very bad weather. Over Dunkirk on 2nd June 1940 its first major action was with a large formation of Me109's his Spitfire was damaged and he landed at Southend with a burst tyre. Shared a Do17 on 21st August over the sea at Mabelthorpe. During September 611 flew as part of the Duxford Wing. On the 15th destroyed a He111 and shared a probable Do17. 28th September went to 41 Sqd at Hornchurch. Two days later he damaged a Do17. Shot down a Me109 on 20th October and the pilot baled out near Ashford. Brown landed at West Malling and collected the German pilot's lifejacket to confirm his victory. The squadron jumped a formation of forty Me109's on the 25th. Brown attacked one and claimed it as a probable when it disappeared into cloud, streaming glycol. This aircraft was later confirmed as destroyed. In January 1942 became 'A' Flight Commander. Posted 28th June to 61 OTU Heston as a Flight Commander. On 15th July he was transferred to the Empire Flying School at Hullavington and qualified as a flying instructor in October 1942. Brown was then posted to the Hurricane OTU at Tealing as a Flight Commander. From 21st July 1943 Brown was attached to the FTS at Cranwell, where he trained Turkish pilots on Spitfires to operational level. On 1st January 1944 he was posted to Training Command as Squadron Leader Flying and OC Satellite at 5, 9 and 14 AFUs, flying Harvards and Oxfords.

Promoted to flight lieutenant in January 1944 and subsequently to the rank of squadron leader. Air Force Cross in December 1945. He was released from the RAF in November 1945, retaining the rank of squadron leader. In 2004, Brown wrote 'Honour Restored' about the Battle of Britain and his exploits and those of his fellow pilots.


Signed envelope

17 BurdekinAlan GeorgeSgt142405RAFVRBritish266Sqn

600Sqn

264Sqn

278Sqn

577Sqn

BlenheimSurvived warJune 2008Born 26 June 1917. Joined RAFVR at Derby on 29 March 1939 as an Airman u/t WOp/AG. Posted to 266 Sqd at Sutton Bridge on 31 October 1939 on Fairey Battles. Posted to 9 Air Observers School at Penrhos on 28 November. As an LAC Air Gunner he rejoined 266 on 9 January 1940. To 264 Sqd Martlesham Heath on 1st February. Promoted to Sergeant on 6 June and then posted away from 264 on the 13th to 5 OTU Aston Down to convert to Blenheims. 7th July 1940 joined 600 Sqd at Manston. Posted to 10 Signals School at Blackpool on 21st September for a wireless course. He completed this at 2 Electrical and Wireless School at Yatesbury from 4th January to 31st March 1941, qualifying as a wireless operator. Rejoined 600 Sqd till 16th July when he joined 125 Sqd at Colerne. 13th October 1941 went to 278 Sqd Air Sea Rescue. Commissioned in January 1943 and remained with the squadron until 18th March 1944. He then went to 577 Sqd (AA Cooperation). Released from the RAF on 29 December 1945 as a Flying Officer. Emigrated with his family to New Zealand in October 1947. He was in the RNZAF Active Reserve from 1953 to 1958.
18 CareyFrank ReginaldFlt Lt43132RAFBritish43Sqn

CBE

DFC & 2 Bars

DFM

Silver Star (USA)
Hurricane23Died Chichester Age 922004-12-06Official Ace. Born 1912-05-07 in Brixton South London. Posted to 43 Sqd (Fighting Cocks) for three years. Engineering course then applied for flight training. In 1935 posted back to 43 Sqd at Tangmere as Sergeant Pilot. Good aerobatic pilot in the Hawker Fury. On 1940-01-30 scored 43 Sqd first kill of the war. Got 2 more before end of February. DFM 1940-03-01 and commissioned. Posted to 3 Sqd to France. Got 3 Sqd first kill, added 5 more. Shot down and wounded. DFC and Bar 1940-05-31. Rejoined 43 Sqd mid June as a Flight Commander. On 1940-06-19 shot down a Bf 109 and damaged another. 7 more kills including a Bf 110 1940-07-09 and another Bf 109 on the 19th of July. On 1940-08-18 Hurricane I (R4109) damaged, he had been hit by a stray bullet in combat over Thorney Island and force landed near to Pulborough. Second bar to DFC 1942-03-24 and the AFC on 1945-01-01. Awarded CBE and Silver Star USA.

Commanded 135 Sqd RAF, as acting squadron leader, in August 1941. In December the Squadron began moving to India, with Carey leading the formation against the Japanese invasion of Burma. In February 1942 he was promoted to wing commander and by the end of the year had shot down nine Japanese aircraft. Carey was taken off operations and sent to RAF Amarda Road in India as Air Officer Commanding (AOC) Air Fighting Training Unit 1 in 1943. In November 1944 he was promoted to group captain and left Burma for Egypt as AOC at OTU 73. Carey was mentioned in the 1945 New Year Honours list. In July 1945 he moved to England as Group Captain Tactics at the Central Flying Establishment until the Japanese surrender on 2 September 1945.
Wikipedia


Signed envelope

Allied Losses and Incidents Database


19 ClarkWilliam Terence Montague 'Terry'Sgt (later Flt Lt)819004 (126026)RAF AAFBritish615Sqn

219Sqn

488Sqn RNZAF

DFM

Air Efficiency

Blenheim2020-05-07 Age 101Surviving aircrew. Beaufighter radar navigator. On his passing he left only one surviving Battle of Britain survivor.

Born 11 April 1919 Croydon England was a British nightfighter navigator/radar operator in the Royal Air Force from 1938 to 1945. Clark enlisted in the Auxiliary Air Force in 1938 joining 615 Sqd at Kenley in March 1938 as an aircrafthand, then trained to be an aircraft gunner in Hawker Hectors on Army cooperation duties. He joined 219 Sqd then flying Bristol Blenheims at Catterick on 12 July 1940, later training on radar as a radio observer, flying in Bristol Beaufighters. On the night of 16/17 April 1941 Clark flew with the commanding officer of 219 Sqd, Wing Commander T.G. Pike, when Pike's own navigator was taken ill. They intercepted and destroyed a Junkers 88 and a Heinkel He 111 in the Guildford area. During the night of 27/28 April 1941, flying with Flying Officer D.O. Hobbis, his regular pilot, Clark assisted in the destruction of an unidentified enemy aircraft, on each of 1/2 June and 13/14 June 1941 they shot down a Heinkel He 111. DFM 8 July 1941. In July 1941 he was posted to 1455 Flight, then forming at Tangmere with Turbinlite Havocs. In May 1942 he went to 1451 Flight at Hunsdon on the same duties, locating enemy aircraft by radar in the Havoc, for accompanying fighters to attack and destroy. The scheme was not a success and was eventually abandoned. Commissioned as a Pilot Officer in May 1942, moved to 60 OTU in October 1942 as a Navigation/Radar Instructor. In May 1943 he was posted to 488 Sqd (NZ) at Ayr as Navigator to the newly-arrived 'A' Flight Commander, S/Ldr. DO Hobbis, his original pilot from 219 Squadron and 1455 and 1451 Flights. On 20th December 1943 Clark was flying with P/O D Robinson when they destroyed a Me410 over Sussex. At the end of his tour in March 1944 Clark went to North Weald Sector Operations, where he trained as a Controller. Whilst there he was given leave to visit 488, then at Colerne. He went to dispersal to see Robinson, now a Flying Officer. His navigator was unfit to fly and Clark offered to take his place. On this sortie, a beachead patrol on the night of 28th/29th July, they destroyed a Ju188. Clark returned to North Weald next day. He rejoined 488 in August 1944 but two months later went to RAF Honiley Ground Approach School, after which he took No. 1 GCA Unit to Prestwick, as second-in-command. Clark had reached the rank of Flight Lieutenant by the end of the war. Post war Clark joined the reconstituted Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAFVR) in 1949 serving in the Fighter and Aircraft Control Branches before resigning his commission in 1954.




Signed book



20 CliftDouglas Gerald 'Duggie'Fg Off41828RAFBritish79Sqn

Hurricane5Survived warDecember 31st, 2008. Age 89Born 15th March 1919. Joined RAF in January 1939. Training at 5 E&RFTS on 23rd January 1939. 11 FTS Shawbury. 11 Group Pool, St Athan on 24 October 1939 and after converting to Hurricanes, he joined 79 Squadron at Biggin Hill on November 17. On 10th May the squadron went to France. On the 16th Clift shared a Fw189 north of Gembloux and on the 17th he shared a Do17. The squadron returned to Biggin Hill on the 20th. Clift destroyed a Me110 over Dunkirk on 27th May. On 15th August 1940 he claimed a Me110 destroyed, on the 30th he shared in the destruction of a He111 and on 1st September he probably destroyed a Me110. His final victory with 79 was on 24th March 1941 when he probably destroyed a He111. In July 1941 he was posted to the Central Flying School at Upavon for an instructor's course. Clift later volunteered for the Merchant Ship Fighter Unit (MSFU) and served with it until October 1942. He remained on flying duties for the rest of the war, finishing up in South-East Asia with the Royal Indian Air Force (RIAF). After the war Clift served with 34 Squadron flying photo-reconnaissance Spitfires until its disbandment in August 1947. later he became a radar specialist,

21 CorryNoel HenryPlt Off80544RAFVRBritish25Sqn

12Sqn

DFC

BlenheimSurvived war27th March 2006Sometimes spelt 'Cory'. Born in December 1918. Joined RAFVR 22 February 1939 as an Airman u/t Pilot. Trained at 24 E&RFTS Sydenham, Belfast. Posted to 4 ITW at Bexhill-on-Sea on outbreakof war. To 11 FTS Shawbury on No. 17 Course, which started on 20th November 1939. Commissioned and posted to 5 OTU Aston Down on 8th June 1940 to convert to Blenheims. Joined 25 Squadron at Martlesham Heath on 26 June 1940 till 29th January 1941. Posted to Special Duties Flight, 72 Group at Northolt and later at Denham and Eastchurch.19 February 1942 he joined 8 (P) AFU, training in precision night landings, then on to 2 FIS Montrose on 14th April 1942 for a flying instructors course, after which he was posted to 14(P) AFU Banff as a Flight Commander Flying Instructor, operating Oxfords. 14 March 1944 went to 30 OTU Hixon, flying Wellingtons, to prepare for operational flying in heavy bombers. He moved to 1656 HCU Lindholme. Joined a crew who had lost their skipper. After two weeks at the No. 1 Lancaster Finishing School at Hemswell, the crew then joined 12 Sqd at Wickenby, he as a Squadron Leader and 'A Flight Commander. He was required to do only 20 operations but his crew, on their first tour, had to complete 30. Keen to stay with them, he continued after his quota was up and he was posted away when it was discovered that he had done 24. DFC 8th December 1944. To HQ Bomber Command Air Staff, attached to HQ No. 1 Group, Bawtry, as Air Crew Safety and Rescue Officer. His final posting was to No. 1 Parachute School. Released on 27th November 1945 as a Squadron Leader.




Signed by Peter Rich, Noel Corry, Kenneth Lusty


22 CowardJames BairdFlt Lt39412RAFBritish19Sqn

AFC

SpitfireWIADiedDied in Australia 2012 aged 97.RAF in 1936, served with 19 and 266 Sqds. With 266 flew Spitfires over Dunkirk as ‘A’ Flight commander, probably destroying a Bf 109 on 2 June 1940. At the end of the month he rejoined 19 Sqd at Fowlmere. On 31 August, one of the heaviest days of fighting in the Battle of Britain, Coward was shot down during an attack on Do 17s east of Duxford. He baled out, badly wounded, and landed by the Royston-Newmarket Road. Coward was taken to Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge, where his left leg was amputated below the knee. During his descent he had used his radio lead to improvise a tourniquet for the leg. After recovering, he was posted to the staff of the Prime Minister, with responsibility for roof spotting at Chequers and Chartwell. He then held various senior instructing posts, before going to the Air Ministry to take charge of fighter operational training. He remained in the RAF after the war and was awarded the AFC in 1954, having carried out test work on the Gloster Meteor while commanding an advanced flying training school. Retired from the service in 1969 and went to Australia.

With 266 Sqd at the start of the War. Flying with 19 Sqd when injured 1940-08-31 at 08:30hrs. Baled out Spitfire I (X4231) with a serious leg wound after combat with a Do 17 near Duxford. Leg was later amputated. Spitfire I crashed at Little Shelford, Essex. Retired from the RAF at the rank of Air Cdre. Born 1915




Pencil drawing by Steve Teasdale of Brian Lane has been signed by 3 Battle of Britain Spitfire pilots from 19 Squadron. The signatures are : Gordon Sinclair, James Coward and David Cox. This image has become synonymous with the tired state of our brave pilots as they battled in the skies over England in 1940.

23 CoxDavid George Samuel RichardsonSgt101041British19Sqn

72Sqn

130Sqn

504Sqn

222Sqn (CO)

1Sqn (CO)

DFC & Bar

Croix de Guerre (France)

Spitfire7.5WIASurvived war20th January 2004Wounded 1940-09-27 at 12:20hrs. Crash-landed Spitfire I (X4237) after a dogfight with a Bf 109 near Wye.

Born 18th April 1920 at Southsea, Hampshire England. Educated at Bournemouth Collegiate School. Joined RAFVR in April 1939 as an Airman u/t Pilot. Training at 19 E&RFTS Gatwick. Posted to 10 FTS Tern Hill and was on No. 16 Course, which ran from 6th November 1939 to 11th May 1940. Joined 19 Sqd at Duxford on 23 May 1940. On 19th August shared a Me110, on the 31st he probably destroyed a Me110, on 9th September he shot down a Me109, on the 11th he got a probable Do17 and on the 15th he destroyed another Me109. Shot down on the 27 September over Canterbury in Spitfire X4237. Crashing at Wye Court Farm at Wye. He was admitted to hospital and was there for three months. Me109 destroyed on 27th June 1941 but his Spitfire was badly damaged and he made a crash-landing at Dungeness. Probably Me109 on 12 August. Commissioned in July 1941 and posted 12th September to instruct at 57 OTU Hawarden. He went to CFS Upavon for two weeks in October on an instructors course. In May 1942 Cox joined 72 Sqd at Biggin Hill. Damaged a Fw190 on 26th July west of Calais. Posted to North Africa in November 1942. 16 November to Maison Blanche airfield, Algeria. A probable Me109 on the 25th, one certain on 26th, probably got one on the 27th, destroyed a Ju88 on the 29th, a He111 on the ground on 2nd December and shot down a Me109 on the 4th. On 2nd January 1943 damaged a Me109. Flight Commander and DFC 16th February 1943. Damaged a Me109 on 26th March, shot one down and damaged another on 3rd April, probably destroyed a Fw190 on the 12th and damaged another on the 19th. Tour expired on 26th April 1943, posted back to the UK on 15th May. From 21st June to 3rd August 1943 he gave talks at factories, after which he became a Tactics Liaison Officer, instructing American pilots. Bar to the DFC 9th July 1943. Early January 1944 to 130 Squadron at Scorton but moved to 504 Squadron at Hornchurch on the 20th as a Flight Commander. On 12th March 1944 he went to 84 Group Support Unit, Aston Down, remaining there until 5th June when he was posted to command 222 Sqd at Selsey. Rejoined 84 GSU, then at Thruxton, on 17th July and stayed until 2nd October 1944 when he was posted to 1 Sqd at Detling. Croix de Guerre (France) in September. Commanded 1 Sqd on 1st January 1945. 5th April to HQ 221 Group Burma. He led 909 (Spitfire) Wing from 21st May to 26th September 1945, when he went to HQ RAF Siam. Released from the RAF on 11th March 1946.


Pencil drawing by Steve Teasdale of Brian Lane has been signed by 3 Battle of Britain Spitfire pilots from 19 Squadron. The signatures are : Gordon Sinclair, James Coward and David Cox. This image has become synonymous with the tired state of our brave pilots as they battled in the skies over England in 1940.


24 CrewEdward DixonFg Off74700RAFBritish604Sqn

85Sqn

96Sqn (CO)

CB

DSO & Bar

DFC & Bar
Blenheim15 + 31.5 x V1Survived war18th August 20024th highest scorer against V1 and the most effective Mosquito pilot. Official Ace, Retired with the rank of AVM. 1917-2002

Born 24 December 1917 at Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire England. Educated at Felsted School and Downing College, Cambridge, joined the University Air Squadron 1939. Full-time service on 8 November 1939. Posted to 3 ITW Hastings in November and moved on to RAF College FTS Cranwell in January 1940. Converted to Blenheims. Joined 604 Squadron at Gravesend on 8 July 1940. 11 August 1940 shared a He59 floatplane 30 miles from Cherbourg. 11 September shared a Do18 flying boat being towed by an E-boat. During the night of 4th/5th April 1941 with Sgt. NH Guthrie, as his radar operator, destroyed a He111, on the 8th damaged another, on the nights of the 24th/25th and the 28th/29th they shot down He111s. On 8th/9th May another He111 was damaged and on 7th/8th July a Ju88 and a He111 were destroyed. Crew awarded DFC 29th July 1941. After Guthrie was posted away during the night of 2nd/3rd April 1942 he destroyed a He111, on the 26th/27th damaged another and on 3rd/4th May and 4th/5th May he destroyed Do217s. Made 'A' Flight Commander in May 1942. Bar to DFC 16th June 1942. October 1942 Crew became OC of the Radio Development Flight, conducting radio and radar anti-jamming trials and training. In March 1943 he joined 85 Sqd at Hunsdon, as a Flight Commander, night of 23rd/24th April he damaged a Do217 and on 21st/22nd May he shot down a Fw190. Took command of 96 Sqd at Church Fenton in June 1943. On 4th/5th January 1944 he shot down a Me410 and damaged another, on 13th/14th February destroyed a Ju188 and on 18th/19th April another Me410. Between June and early August 1944 Crew shot down 21 V1s at night. On 25th June 1944 shooting down a V1 the explosion as he shot it down split open his own aircraft's nose. Crew held Mosquito XIII MM499 steady long enough for his radar navigator, WO WR Croysdill, to bail out over land. Then, as the Mosquito became uncontrollable, Crew himself jumped, landing safely near Worthing, in Sussex. DSO 26th September 1944 with 13 enemy aircraft destroyed. 96 Sqd was disbanded on 12th December 1944 and Crew went to RAF Staff College in January 1945 and was later granted a permanent commission. Between July 1948 and February 1950 Crew led 45 Squadron in operations against the terrorists in Malaya. He was awarded a Bar to the DSO 10th March 1950.




Signed envelope

25 Crowley-MillingDenis W 'Crow'Plt Off (later Air Marshal)RAFBritish242Sqn

KCB
CBE
DSO
DFC & Bar

Air Efficiency
Hurricane4Died1996-12-01Official Ace, Born 1919-03-22. Educated at Malvern College. Apprentice at Rolls Royce and learned to fly in RAFVR. Called up 1939-08-23 posted to 615 Sqd Gladiators. Re-equipped with Hurricanes. Flew in France with 607 Sqd and on return posted to 242 Sqd with C/O Douglas Bader. Shot down a He 111 on 1940-08-30 his first kill. 1940-09-06 he made a forced landing after being hit in combat. He shot down 2 more enemy aircraft during the September 1940 a Bf 110 and a Bf 109. Later awarded the DFC and the DSO. Attained rank of Air Marshal and he also recieved a Knighthood. Retired in 1975 as AM Sir Denis Crowley-Milling. Appointed Controller of the RAF Benevolent Fund and became president of the Not Forgotten Association. 'I flew the following aircraft in combat during the 1939-45 war: Gladiator, Hurricane Mk I & 11, Spitfire V(b), and Typhoon. After the war I flew the Tempest III on active service in Egypt, Palestine, Iraq, Sudan and Somaliland. It is hardly surprising to say that the Spitfire was my favourite. It felt part of you, it responded delightfully under all conditions, and most of all, it gave you ample warning of the high speed stall in a turn in combat; and you knew that a Me 109 could not (or would not) turn inside you.'


Signed Envelope

26 CurrantChristopher Frederick 'Bunny'Flt Lt (later W/C)43367RAFBritish605Sqn

DSO

DFC & Bar
Croix de Guerre (Belgian)

MiD

Royal Norwegian Order of St Olav

Hurricane9Survived war2006-03-12Official Ace. Commissioned in March 1940, posted from 151 Sqd to 605 Sqd's Hurricane. Shot down 9 during September and October 1940 . DFC. Later became a Squadron Commander then Wing Commander Ibsley Wing 1942. Commanded 122 Wing 2TAF 1944

Born in Luton England on 14th December 1911. Educated at Rydal School. Joined the RAF in 1936 as a direct-entry Airman u/t Pilot. He began training on 6th January. He was serving with 46 Squadron at Kenley in 1937 and with 151 Squadron at North Weald in 1939, both operating Gauntlets.Commissioned on 1st April 1940, Currant joined 605 Squadron the same day. On 1st April 1940, Currant joined 605 Squadron. On 22nd May he shot down a He111 on a patrol south of Arras. His Hurricane P3575 was hit by return fire and he made a crash-landing, breaking his nose. After burning his aircraft, he made his way to Calais on foot and returned to England by sea. Currant rejoined his squadron at Hawkinge. On 15th August 1940 Currant claimed two He111's destroyed and probably another, on 8th September a Me109 and a Do17 damaged, on the 9th he shared in the destruction of a Me109 and a Me110, on the 11th he claimed a He111 destroyed and four others damaged. He was appointed 'A' Flight Commander on 5th September and promoted to Acting Flight Lieutenant on the 13th. On 12th September Currant shared a Do17, on the 15th he claimed a Me109 and two Do17's destroyed and a He111 and three Do17's damaged, on the 27th a Me110 destroyed and a Me109 damaged and on the 28th another Me109 destroyed. On 4th October and 8th October he shared Ju88's and on 15th October he damaged two Me109's.

Currant was awarded the DFC 8th October 1940 and Bar 15th November 1940. When Squadron Leader McKellar was killed on 1st November Currant took temporary command of 605. He destroyed a Me109 on 15th November. Currant relinquished his temporary command of the squadron on 29th November when the new CO came. He destroyed a Me109 on 1st December. In early 1941 Currant was posted to 52 OTU Debden and in July he was CFI. A return to operations came on 14th August 1941 when he took command of 501 Squadron at Ibsley. He appeared briefly as himself in the film 'The First of the Few', filmed at Ibsley (with David Niven). Currant damaged a Me109 on 8th November 1941 and destroyed another on 17th April 1942. On Circus 113 to Marzingarbe on 9th March he engaged three German fighters and his Spitfire Vb W3846 was shot up. The instrument panel was destroyed and a bullet struck the back of his head but Currant managed to escape at low level. In great pain he landed at Lympne but his aircraft turned over on to its back due to the undercarriage tyres having been shot through. He was trapped in the petrol-soaked cockpit but was soon rescued from the wreckage. After a month in hospital he returned to flying with fragments of shrapnel still in his head. He was promoted to Acting Wing Commander in June and appointed to lead the Ibsley Wing. He was awarded the DSO (gazetted 7th July 1942). From 15th February 1943 until 24th July 1944 Currant commanded 122 Wing 2TAF.



Courtesy battleofbritainbooks.co.uk
27 DarleyHorace Stanley 'George'Sqd Ldr32191RAFBritish609Sqn

DSO

Spitfire3Survived war1999 Age 86Official Ace. Born in November of 1913, was CO of 609 Sqd in 1940 during the early stages of the Battle of Britain. He joined the RAF in 1932 and began his flying career in relatively little known and ungainly biplanes known as Fairey Gordons, Vickers Vincents and Fairey IIIBs. He flew these aircraft in Yemen and British Somaliland. He fought in the Battle of France and then with 609 Sqd at RAF Northolt in the Battle of Britain. In the three months that he commanded 609, the pilots scored 85 victories with the loss of just 7 of their own aircraft. Darley was awarded the DSO during this period, the first to be awarded for leadership in the Battle of Britain. During his 27-year career with the RAF, he commanded 11 RAF Stations and flew 65 different types.



Cover produced for the 50th Anniversary of the Battle of Britain. Cover depicts Hurricanes of 1, 17, 46 249 257 and 310 Squadrons in action over Colchester, a Heinkel III shot down by Blenheim of 25 Squadron on 4th September 1940 and BF110s of 6 Staffel attacking the factories of Vicker and Hawker at Brooklands. Signed by George Darley. Born on November 3 1913 at Wandsworth, Darley joined the RAF in August 1932. He carried out his training at 2FTS, Digby and afterwards joined 207 Squadron at Bircham Newton on August 20 1933. He was posted overseas on February 9 1935, going to 8 Squadron at Khormaksar, Aden and later Somaliland. Darley was granted a Permanent Commission in 1936. He returned to the UK and on January 2 1937 went to CFS, Upavon for an instructor's course, after which he was posted to 7FTS, Peterborough, as a Flight Commander. On June 61938 Darley was appointedadjutant and flying insructor at 602 Squadron, AuxAF at Abbotsinch, moving on December 21938 to 611 Squadron, AuxAF at Speke. Soon after the outbreak of war Darley was made Controller at Debden and on May 9 1940 he was posted to Merville as Controller. After returning to England in late May he went as supernumerary Squadron Leader to 65 Squadron at Hornchurch and on June 22 he took command of 609 Squadron at Northolt. On August 8 Darley claimed a Bf 110 destroyed, on the 15th a probable Ju 88, on the 25th a Bf 109 and a Bf 110 and on September 25 a Dq 17. He was posted away on October 41940 to become Station Commander at Exeter. He was awarded the DSO (22.10.40). Darley was posted to Air HO Singapore on May 17 1941, on Fighter Defence. He went to RAF Kuala Lumpur on December 11 as Station Commander, returned to 224 Group, Singapore on January 8 1942 as Ops 1, moved to 226 Group, Sumatra on February 3 and after the inevitable collapse caused by the Japanese advance he arrived at RAF Depot, Karachi on March 16. Appointed Station Commander at RAF Risalpur on October 7 1942, Darley remained there until February 7 1943, when he was posted to 221 Group, Calcutta. On June 11 he returned to Risalpur to command 151 OTU there, as a Group Captain. Darley returned to the UK in July 1944 and was given command of 62 OTU, Ouston. He was made Station Commander at RAF Cranfield on June 15 1945 and went to RAF Staff College, Bracknell in August for a course. Group Captain Darley then held a series of appointments and commands before he retired from the Royal Air Force on June 15th 1959. During a long and distinguished flying career he flew sixty six different types of aircraft.



28 DavidWilliam DennisFg Off (later Grp Cpt)40805RAFBritish87Sqn

213Sqn

CBE

DFC & Bar

AFC

MiD

Hurricane20 (probably 27+)Survived war25th August 2000Born in Surbiton, Surrey England on 25 July 1918 and spent his early childhood at Tongwynlais, a village near Cardiff. Official Ace. Flew Hurricanes 87 Sqd in Battle for France until October 1940 and then joined 213 Sqd. He shot down 8 enemy and 5 unconfirmed in France and 7 confirmed in the Battle of Britain. Group Captain. One of the highest-scoring RAF pilots of the first half of the Second World War, Dennis David notched up the astonishing total of 11 combat victories in May 1940, before the Battle of Britain had even begun. His Hurricane squadron, No 87, had been posted to France in the early days of the war, as part of the Air Component of the British Expeditionary Force. There, throughout the 'Phoney War' months, September 1939 to April 1940, it saw little of the enemy apart from the odd reconnaissance machine. All this was to change with dramatic suddenness on the 10th of May 1940, when the full fury of the German Blitzkrieg burst on the frontiers of Holland, Belgium and France. David was in action from the opening hours of the German invasion, performing with incredible coolness against Luftwaffe pilots, many of whom had honed their combat techniques in the Spanish Civil War.

Joined RAF in 1938. Joined 87 Sqd at Debden, near Saffron Walden flying Hurricanes. Posted to France together with 85 Sqd in September 1939 as part of No 60 Wing in the Air Component of the British Expeditionary Force. Stationed at Lille, near the Belgian Border, and saw little action until the German Army began its blitzkrieg through the Netherlands, Belgium and North Eastern France. During May 1940 the RAF in France was greatly outnumbered, often 10 to 1 or worse. During this period Dennis David shot down 14 aircraft before suffering from exhaustion due to the intense fighting and was repatriated to England by air ambulance. Upon returning he rejoined 87 Sqd at Exeter, reforming in preparation for the Battle of Britain. In action from July to October 1940 and during this time his score climbed to 20, with many others unconfirmed, as he was always attacked by other enemy fighters before firm claims could be made. David continued to fly during the Battle of Britain, for which 87 Squadron was moved to Exeter, where it saw heavy fighting and took a severe toll of the enemy. David continued his remarkable run of combat victories. He shot down two aircraft on the 11th of August, a Ju88 and a Messerschmitt 109. He was credited with two more, a Ju87 "Stuka" and a Messerschmitt 110 twin-engined fighter, besides having a half share in another Me110 on the 15th of August; this was the day of Germany's heaviest losses in the air, and was ever after referred to in Luftwaffe circles as 'der schwarze Donnerstag' (Black Thursday). 87 played its part in repelling the 1,786 sorties that were launched at Britain that day. David's third "two-kill" day was the 25th of August, when he shot down another Ju88 and a Messerschmitt 109. In October, he was posted as a flight commander to 213 Squadron, another Hurricane squadron, also based at Exeter. David's final kill was on the 19th of October when he shot down a Ju88 to bring his score to 20.In October 1940, Dennis David posted to be a Flight Commander in 213 Sqd, Tangmere where he damaged a Ju88 so badly, that it crash landed in Northern France, taking his tally to over 20 victories. In November 1940 he was posted to command a Flight of 152 Sqd, Warmwell flying Spitfires. From 1941 to 1943 rose to the rank of Wing Commander and was then posted to the Middle East to command 89 Sqd flying night-fighting Beaufighters, at Tobruk and Tripoli. In November 1943 moved to the Far East where he was promoted to Group Captain and took part in the liberation of Burma as SASO 224 Group. Continued to serve in the RAF until his retirement in 1967. During which time he was appointed Honorary Aide to the Viscount Trenchard, the ‘Father of the Royal Air Force’, from 1954 until the Viscount’s death. He was also Her Majesty’s Air Attache in Budapest at the time of the Hungarian Uprising and became responsible in assisting 400 people to escape from Hungarian and Russian Secret Police, for this he was knighted by the exiled ruler of Hungary, Grand Duke Arpad of Hapsburg.





29 Deacon-ElliotRobertPORAFVR (later RAF)British72Sqn

CB

OBE

DFC

MiD (x2)

Spitfire4Survived war5th June 1997Born Church Brampton, Northampton, England. RAFVR in 1938 and trained as pilot in his spare time. Outbreak of war called up, commissioned and posted to 72 Sqd. He later rose through the ranks from Flight Lieutenant to Squadron Leader upwards to Wing Commander and eventually to Air Vice-Marshal. During the Battle of Britain he was shot down by a Messerschmitt 109, baled out and returned to action the same day, evening the score by downing a 109. During the four most critical days of the Battle of Britain he shot down at least one enemy aircraft a day. On 15th August 1940 he and 10 colleagues intercepted a raid crossing the coast between Acklington and Blyth of around 100 enemy aircraft. Seven attacked the He 111 bombers whilst the other four attacked the escorting Me 110 fighters. Flying at 20,000ft his oxygen supply failed, he passed out and his Spitfire, now housed in the Science Museum, went into a nose-dive. He came around at 1000ft, too low to bale out but managed to the pull the Spitfire out of the dive and land it back at RAF Acklington where his squadron was based. The Spitfire was written off but the Deac was still going. On 4th September 1940 he claimed a Me110 destroyed, on the 6th a Me109, on the 9th a Me110 and on the 11th a He111. He was shot down on 6th September in a head-on attack on a Me109 over Maidstone and baled out, unhurt. His Spitfire, N3070, crashed at Wanshurst Green. At the end of August 1940 he went with 72 Sqd to reinforce 11 Group after the battering it had taken from Goering’s Eagle Offensive. In 1941, when Fighter Command took the offensive, Deacon-Elliott took part in fighter sweeps across the Channel and into France after which he was rested for a while at Fighter Command HQ. In October 1942 he joined 84 Group as part of 2nd Tactical Air Force (2TAF) to help prepare the group to support the Allied invasion of Normandy and the Allied advance through north-west Europe. Post-war flew fighters in Cyprus, stationed as Officer Commanding at RAF Nicosia, and during the 1950s he climbed the ranks with a spell at Army Staff College as directing member of staff, followed by station commands at Leconfield and Driffield. Posted as an exchange to Air University of the USAF at Maxwell Air Force Base he returned home as 1st Commandant of the Officers and Aircrew Selection Centre at Biggin Hill. He was Air Officer Commanding RAF Gibraltar and RAF Malta as well as Deputy Commander-in-Chief (Air) Allied Forces Mediterranean after which he became Acting Air Vice-Marshal on 21st November 1966.


Signed envelope

Baled out safely over Kent 1940-09-04 at 13:20hrs. Spitfire I shot down by a Bf 110 over Hartfield, Sussex. Wounded 1940-09-06 at 09:20hrs. after combat over the Thames Estuary.

30 DeereAlan ChristopherFlt Lt (later Air Commodore)NZ/40370RNZAFNew Zealander54Sqn

DSO

OBE

DFC & Bar

Croix de Guerre (France)

DFC (USA

)
Spitfire22Died 21 September 1995Born in Auckland 1917-12-12. Joined RAF October 1937. 54 Sqd in September 1938. 1940-05-23 A.C took part in a daring rescue operation. He and Pilot Officer Allen escorted their flight commander, James Leathart, to France to pick up the CO of 74 Sqd who had made a forced landing on the airfield at Calais-Marck. The pick-up was made, with Allen watching from 8000 feet and Deere circling at low level. An approaching formation of Bf 109s was spotted by Allen as the Master taxied out for take-off. A strafing Bf 109 pulled out of its dive, Deere fired a short burst and the aircraft stalled and crashed into the sea. Deere, climbing to help Allen, crossed the path of two Bf 109s, one of which turned towards him. Deere also turned, firing at the second one, which rolled over and dived away. Pursuing the first one, he caught up at treetop height and pursued him, firing off his remaining ammunition before the German headed for home. Diving towards the coast Deere called up Allen and was relieved to hear him answer. In the meantime the Master had taken off and headed for Hornchurch. In the action three Bf 109s had been shot down and three others severely damaged. During four days - 23 to 29 May - Deere shot down three Bf 109s and three Bf 110s and in June was decorated with the DFC by the King at a special ceremony at Hornchurch. J.A.Leathart and Allen were decorated at the same time. During the Battle of Britain Deere destroyed seven more enemy fighters and one bomber and was awarded a Bar to the DFC. on the Ist of December 1940 he was sent for a rest, and in January 1941 became an Operations Room Controller. He returned to operations on 7 May 1941, joining 602 Sqd in Scotland as a Flight Commander. On the 10th he was scrambled to investigate a Bf 110 flying westwards. He did not sight the enemy aircraft but after landing was told it had crashed near Glasgow. The pilot was later revealed to be Rudolf Hess. Deere took command of 602 Sqd on August the 1st 1941 and on that day destroyed a Bf 109, his first victory for eleven months. When his second operational tour ended in January 1942 Deere went to the USA to lecture on fighter tactics but was restless for a return to operations. He achieved this in May 1942, when he took command of No 403 Squadron, leading it until August before being posted to staff duties. During a temporary attachment to No 611 Squadron in February 1943 Deere destroyed an FW 190. Some days later he was appointed Wing Leader at Biggin Hill. He flew 121 sorties during his six months' leadership and increased his personal score to twenty-two confirmed victories, ten probables and eighteen damaged. Deere wrote of his experiences and his many escapes from death in his classic book, 'Nine Lives', published in 1959.

Wikipedia


Signed by Al Deere, Adolf Galland, Erich Rudorffer


31 DibnahRonald Harold 'Rolly'Plt OffRAFCanadian1Sqn

242Sqn

91Sqn

HurricaneSurvived warFebruary 1990 CanadaPosted to 1 Sqd RAF in France on 27 April 1940, P/O Roland H "Rolly" Dibnah was wounded in the thigh in a combat over Ochamps on 29 May and made a forced-landing at Nancy. On 31 August, he damaged an Me 110 and on 6 September shared another destroyed. The Canadian was posted to 242 Sqd RAF at RAF Coltishall on 21 September, remaining with them until 30 December 1940. His subsequent service is currently unknown until January 1944 when Dibnah joined 91 Squadron at Tangmere. He transferred to the RCAF on 18th January 1945 and was released on 21st October 1947 as a Flight Lieutenant. He flew Vampires with the RCAF


Dibnah next to Spitfire
32 DrakeBillyPlt Off39095British213Sqn

421 Recon/Flt
DSO

DFC & Bar
HurricaneDied2011Born in 1917. Joined the RAF on a short service commission in 1936. Serving with 1 Sqd (Hurricanes) when war broke out. Went with the squadron to France. A number of victories, but on 13 May 1940 baled out wounded, to a French hospital and was then treated in hospital in England. Posted to 6 OTU Sutton Bridge on 20 June 1940 as an instructor. He flew a patrol with 1 Sqd on 15 August. To 213 Sqd on 2 October. Commanded ‘A’ Flight on the 7th. His last flight with the squadron was on the 21st and it was probably on the 23rd that he joined 421 Flight. DFC at the beginning of 1941. Further period as an instructor, commanded 128 Sqd in West Africa. Commanded 112 Sqd in the Middle East. He continued to destroy enemy aircraft, both in the air and on the ground. During 1942 Drake awarded a bar to the DFC and then a DSO. Commanded a Spitfire Wing in Malta. Later appointments included the leadership of a Typhoon Wing and Deputy Station Commander at Biggin Hill. In September 1945 he took part in the first Battle of Britain flypast over London. Retired from the RAF in 1963 as a Wing Commander, retaining the rank of Group Captain.




33 ElkingtonJohn Francis Durham 'Tim'Plt Off44184British1Sqn

Ushakov Medal (Russia)

Hurricane2WIASurvived warBorn 1920 in Warwickshire. RAF College, Cranwell in September 1939, as a Flight Cadet. 14 July 1940 Elkington received a permanent commission, and the next day he joined 1 Sqd at Northolt. Training with the Northolt Sector Training Flight during the second half of the month and on 27 July made his first operational flight. Got a Bf 109 on 15 August. His combat report for that event read: “I was Green 2 of Squadron 1. When patrolling due east from Martlesham at 10,000 feet, an Me 109 approached me from head-on and to the left 1,000 feet below. The e/a started to climb and turn to the left but I turned sharp left and came in behind him and gave him one short burst with no known effect. I again fired at the e/a from astern as it straightened out and went into a steep climb. I gave it a 2 second burst from astern and above. The engine of the e/a belched fumes and it turned over on its back, staying there for about 2 seconds. I then circled round and saw no one get out.” The next day he was in Flight Sergeant Berry’s section when the squadron was ordered to patrol Portsmouth. A large force of enemy aircraft was encountered and his Hurricane was hit by a cannon shell in the starboard fuel tank and burst into flames. Baled out near the Nab light, east of the Isle of Wight. Berry followed him and with his slipstream he blew Elkington over land at West Wittering. Elkington was taken to hospital at Chichester; his aircraft crashed and burned out at Manor Farm, Chidham. Flight Sergeant Berry, DFM was killed in action on 1 September. He rejoined 1 Sqd on 1 October. He probably destroyed a Ju 88 on the 9th and shared a Do 215 on the 27th. Instructor in April 1941 but joined 601 Sqd in late May, moving in July to 134 Sqd, re-forming for service in Russia. Embarked on HMS Argus and on 7 September flew to the airfield at Vaenga, near Murmansk. During September and early October, 134 took part in bomber escorts and airfield defence. In mid-October it began training Russian pilots on Hurricanes, which were handed over at the end of the month. While in Russia Elkington shared in the destruction of a Ju 88. In mid-November 1941, the squadron pilots began the journey home, making their way in three minesweepers to Archangel and sailing from there in HMS Berwick. Elkington returned in the MV Empire Baffin, carrying minerals as part of Convoy QP 3. He was escorting an injured pilot. Further operational postings, including in India. Returned to the UK in October 1946 and retired from the RAF in December 1975 as a Wing Commander. In 2014 Elkington received the Ushakov Medal from the Russian Ambassador in London.

Injured 1940-08-16 at 13:05hrs when Hurricane I (P3173) shot down over Thorny Island. Surviving aircrew Born 1920


Signed envelope



34 EllacombeJohn Lawrence WemyssPlt Off (later Air Commodore)43031RAFBritish151Sqn

Order of the Bath

DFC & Bar

Hurricane2WIASurvived warPosted 151 Sqd 1940-07-13 never having flown a Hurricane. P/O F.B.Sutton of 56 Sqd (non-operational owing to being wounded in France) was assigned to convert him along with another pilot, P/O J.T.Johnston. August 1940-08-24 he shot down a He 111. 1940-08-31 at 13:30hrs badly burned when shot down near Southend by return fire from Ju 88s and gravity fuel tank exploded in Hurricane (P3312) as he was baling out. He did not return to operations until December 1940. DFC 1942-04-07. 1942-07-28 probably destroyed a Do 217 at night in co-operation with a Turbinlite Havoc. Bar to DFC 1944-12-29. Surviving aircrew; Retired at the rank of Air Cdre Born 1920


Signed by Pete Brothers, John Ellacombe, Anthony Russell, Derek Yapp

35 FalkowskiJan PawelFg Off (later W/C)P-0493PAFPolish32Sqn

Virtuti Militari

DFC

Krzyz Walecznych (x4)

Medal Lotniczy (x3)

Wound Badge (x2)
Hurricane9Survived war2001-01-27After the surrender of France on June 23, he arrived in Great Britain. Assigned to 32 Sqd RAF. Then he went to 315 Sqd as the commander of the "A" squadron from July 1941 to June 1942. Military College in Scotland. After graduation, appointed on 03.07.1943 as commander of 303 Sqd. In 1944 he was a joint officer on staff 1 Div. Panc. Gen. St. Maczka, and later from 31.01.1945 the commander of the 3rd Polish Wing. Shot down over the Netherlands, escaped from captivity and reached the Allied forces. After demobilization he went to Canada. - died in Peterborough ON Canada

Archiwum Database


36 FentonHarold Arthur 'Jim'Sqd Ldr27127British238Sqn (CO)

CBE

DSO

DFC

HurricaneSurvived war1995Injured when ditched his Hurricane I (P2947) into the Channel off the Isle of Wight 1940-08-08 at 13:40hrs near a German observation plane. He was looking for two of his pilots who had been reported missing in the Channel. He was rescued by the HMS Basset. Retired 1957

Born in Argentina in 1909. Grew up in Ireland. Trinity College, Dublin. Joined RAF 1928. 1929 with 4 Sqd at RAF Farnborough. In 1930 to India No. 5 Army Cooperation Squadron on the frontier. Back in England as a target-towing staff pilot at a Bombing and Gunnery School. but left the RAF and took a job as a chief flying instructor at Air Service Training. February of 1940, recalled by the RAF and sent to instruct at RAF Montrose. As the Battle of Britain began, it was clear that pilots with his experience would be sorely needed and he was given command of 238 Sqd, which he led throughout the Battle. Once forced to ditch in the Channel after chasing a German seaplane at wave top level and being hit by return fire. Following a brief respite, he returned to his squadron, which at this time only had five serviceable Hurricanes. Back in charge, Fenton quickly rectified the situation and 8 factory-fresh Hurricanes soon appeared. One of the hallmarks of Fenton’s leadership was his ability to make things happen. In May 1941, Fenton 238 boys were sent to the Middle East, loaded onto HMS Victorious at Scapa Flow. Then Victorious was ordered into the hunt for Bismarck. They then continued on their journey to Egypt via Gibraltar. Flew off Victorious near the Mediterranean island of Majorca, refuelled at Malta and finally arrived in Egypt. Highly successful in the Western Desert. Soon promoted to lead 243 Wing. In July of 1942, Fenton was a Group Captain in charge of 212 Group and its 12 Hurricane squadrons. In 1943, returned to England and was made commander of the Kenley fighter sector. Retired from the RAF as an Air Commodore and became an executive.



37 FitzgeraldThomas BernardFg OffNew Zealander141Sqn

DFC
Defiant

Wikipedia discussion of Defiant tactics
Died2006-08-12Born in Temuka, New Zealand 1919-07-11. Educated at Timaru Boys' High School. April 1937 commission in RNZAF. Trained at Wigram, left for UK in April 1938, transfer to RAF. Made war’s first single-engined operational flight when dropping leaflets over Frankfurt and testing its night defences 1939-09-19. In early August 1940 posted to Fighter Command, one of 20 pilots from Bomber Command who volunteered in response to a request for trained pilots. Joined 141 Sqd in Scotland 1940-08-10 on night fighter Defiants. Took 'B' Flight south to Biggin Hill 1940-09-12 for night defence of London. Personal Assistant to Gen Hoyt D. Vandenberg, USAAF, Feb 1945; relinquished commission as Flt Lt Temp. Sqn Ldr on appointment to RNZAF, Feb 1946. Retired Dec 1947. Died Christchurch, New Zealand - 12 August 2006
38 FordRoy Clement 'Henry'Sgt88214RAFVRBritish41Sqn

SpitfireSurvived war13th December 2002.Born 15 March 1915 in Hastings, Sussex England. Joined RAFVR in June 1938 as an Airman u/t Pilot.Training at 20 E&RFTS Gravesend. Called up 1 September 1939, to 6 FTS Little Rissington on 6 October for an assessment of his flying capabilities. Joined 41 Sqd at Catterick on 15 December 1939. Probable Me109 on 5 September 1940. 7 September he made a forced-landing between Confield Tye and Tinsleys Farm at West Hanningfield. Unhurt. Commissioned in November 1940, posted to 4 Delivery Flight Grangemouth on 5 April 1941.Volunteered for the Merchant Ship Fighter Unit, at Speke. Joined the unit on 23 May and served in the SS Empire Sun, Empire Shackleton, Empire Heath and Dalton Hall on North Atlantic and Gibraltar convoys. To Hawkers at Langley on 23 June 1942 as a production test pilot. Flew 447 aircraft on their first flight. 17 June 1943 posted for a course to No. 1 Empire Test Pilots School at Boscombe Down, after which he joined 20 MU Aston Down as a test pilot. rleased from the RAF on 23 October 1945 . Commissioned in RAFVR from September 1947 until 11th May 1952, during which time he instructed at 18 Reserve Flying School at Fair Oaks and from April 1948 at 15 RFS Redhill.
39 FosterRobert WilliamPlt Off80815British605Sqn

DFC

Air Efficiency Award

Hurricane7Survived warJuly 13 2014 Kent, England Age 94Born: 14 May, 1920 in South London. Local school in Battersea, London. Six months before war broke out in 1939 Foster joined the RAFVR to train as a pilot. He was called up in August to complete his training before joining 605 Sqd. Stationed for much of the early years of the war at Drem, just outside Edinburgh, from where they patrolled the North Sea. It was sent south in May 1940 to cover the evacuation from Dunkirk and then returned to Drem. Pilot Officer with No 605 (County of Warwick) Squadron in the Battle of Britain, flying Hurricanes into action from Croydon during September and October 1940. On one occasion, while airborne, he watched bombs exploding close to his parents’ home at Clapham, south west London. He later learned that the house had been only slightly damaged. On September 27 1940, a day which Winston Churchill described as “great and victorious”, Pilot Officer Foster’s aircraft was damaged as he attacked a Messerschmitt Bf 110. He forced-landed unhurt at RAF Gatwick. During the Battle he was credited with one enemy aircraft destroyed, one probably destroyed, one shared and two damaged. Later in the war Bob Foster served in Australia with No 54 Squadron equipped with Spitfires. He shot down five Japanese aircraft, probably shot down two more and damaged two. He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and took command of the Royal Australian Air Force base at Night Cliff in the Northern Territory. Back in the UK Bob served at Fighter Command HQ, Bentley Priory, before holding ground appointments at RAF Bentwaters. He was released from the RAF in 1947 and resumed his pre-war career with Shell and BP. He also served in the Royal Auxiliary Air Force. From 2009 he was Chairman of the Battle of Britain Fighter Association.


40 FoxPeter HuttonSgt754399RAFVRBritish56Sqn

HurricaneWIAPoW Survived war10th June 2005Born in Bridlington England on 23 January 1921. Educated at Warwick Public School. Joined RAFVR in June 1939, training at 26 E&RFTS, Kidlington. Called up 1 September, posted to 13 EFTS Fairoaks on 28 March 1940, to 10 EFTS, Yatesbury on 28 May 1940. Advanced training at 8 FTS Montrose. To 5 OTU Aston Down converting to Hurricanes. Joined 56 Sqd at Boscombe Down on 17 September 1940. Shot down in combat with Do17s and Me110s over the Portland area on 30 September. Baled out Hurricane I (N2434) after combat over Portland 1940-09-30 1940 at 17:00hrs which crashed at Okeford Fitzpaine. 16 November Fox and P/O MR Ingle-Finch were flying to Kidlington in a Magister when they crashed near Tidworth. Both were injured and admitted to Tidworth Hospital. 28 June 1941 Fox joined 234 Sqd at Warmwell. Shot down over France on 20 October 1941 in Spitfire Vb AD203 and captured. Freed on 16th April 1945, Fox left the RAF in 1946 as a Warrant Officer.
41 Foxley-NorrisChristopher NeilFg Off70225British3Sqn

615Sqn

143Sqn

252Sqn

603Sqn (CO)

143Sqn (CO)

GCB

DSO

OBE

HurricaneSurvived war28th September 2003.Born 16 March 1917 Birkenhead England. Joined the Oxford University Air Squadron in 1936. Awarded a Harmsworth scholarship (worth £200) to read for the Bar. However, the outbreak of war prevented him from taking his final exams. The Bar Council requested the money back, but Foxley-Norris made an arrangement with them that he would leave it to them in his will. Commissioned in RAFVR. Active service in 1939. Initial flying training at No. 9 Flying Training School at RAF Hullavington and completed the training at No 1 School of Army Co-operation. Posted to 13 Sqd RAF flying Lysanders in the Battle of France. Following the fall of France and the start of the Battle of Britain, the need for Army Co-operation pilots was greatly reduced whilst that for fighter pilots was increased. He joined 111 Sqd at Drem on 29th September but this was an error and he went instead to 3 Sqd at Turnhouse on 30th September 1940 and moved to 615 Sqd at Northolt on 19th November. On 26th February 1941 jumped by Me109s and shot down in flames from 25000 feet in Hurricane IIa Z2754. He baled out, landing near Elmsted, east of Ashford, where he met with a hostile reception from the local population who were convinced that he was German. His Hurricane came down at Little Holt Farm. In early 1943 went to Ferry Command, to fly Hudsons across the Atlantic. He was with 143 Sqd at North Coates in mid 1943, flying Beaufighters on anti-shipping duties as a Flight Commander. Posted to 252 Sqd in the Middle East. CO of 603 Sqd on convoy patrol and sweeps over the enemy-held Greek islands. The squadron was disbanded at Gambut on 26th December 1944. The personnel sailed from Port Said in the Capetown Castle and arrived at Liverpool on 6th January 1945, then went on to Coltishall. Foxley-Norris was given command of 143 Sqd, then part of the Banff Mosquito Strike Wing. Having exchanged its Beaufighters for the faster, more powerful Mosquitos, the squadron ranged the Skaggerak, Kattegat and Germany's north-western seaboard for naval and other maritime targets. DSO Citation: 'This officer has a long and distinguished record of operational flying. He has completed numerous sorties on his third tour of duty during which period he has operated against a wide range of enemy targets. For several months this officer has commanded the squadron. During the period numerous attacks have been made against enemy targets. By his brilliant leadership, exceptional skill and determination, Wing Commander Foxley-Norris has contributed in good measure to the successes obtained.' Retired 1974 with the with the rank of AVM.


Signed envelope: Christopher Foxley-Norris, Tom Gleave, Ginger Lacey, Geoffrey Page, Sandy Johnston, Mieczysław Sawicki


42 FranklinWalter Derrick KerrFg Off40217RAFJAM74Sqn
Spitfire1DiedOctober 2000Born 14 September 1916 in Jamaica. Joined RAF 23 August 1937. 12 E&RFTS Prestwick. 1 RAF Depot Uxbridge for a short induction course, then 9 FTS Hullavington. Joined 142 Sqd at Andover on 20th August 1938. On 2nd September 1939 the squadron flew its Battles out to France. It suffered heavy losses in May 1940 and was withdrawn to Waddington on 15th June. Volunteered for Fighter Command. Joined 74 Sqd 21 August at Kirton-in-Lindsey. Shared damed Do17 September. Ju87 destroyed on 14th November. On 30th December 1940 to CFS Upavon for an instructors course. He was instructing until 1945, when he went for a course at the Empire Test Pilots School at Cranfleld, after which he was posted to Farnborough. Franklin returned to Jamaica 1947 to run the family-owned hotel. Later sold it and returned to England. Died in October 2000 in Southampton.


43 FreebornJohn ConnellFg Off70854British74Sqn
DFC & Bar
Spitfire8.5Died2010-08-28Official Ace. born in Middleton near the city of Leeds in December of 1919. He joined the RAF in 1938 at the age of 18. Following his training, he joined 74 Sqd (Tigers) at RAF Hornchurch in October of 1938. Within days of the declaration of war, flying Spitfires, Freeborn and other members of his squadron engaged what they thought was an enemy force. Sadly, it was a Hurricane Squadron and Freeborn and another pilot of 74 Sqd shot down the first two British airplanes of the Second World War (the so-called Battle of Barking Creek). The ensuing court martial absolved Freeborn and his mate, but caused deep wounds within the squadron when their Flight Leader, 'Sailor' Malan testified against them. Despite the outcome, Freeborn continued with 74 Sqd as did Malan, and when Malan became the squadron commander he often let Freeborn lead, such was his respect for his fighting skill. Freeborn became an ace in the Battle of Britain, and was awarded a DFC in August at the height of the Battle. Throughout the rest of 1940 and into 1941, he increased his score and led the squadron on occasion. In February of 1941, he was awarded a second DFC and then went on to an instructor’s course. This was followed by an appointment as an RAF liaison officer with the RAF’s training program in the United States—specifically in Alabama and Florida. It was here that he test flew the P-51 Mustang and P-47 Thunderbolt. In December of 1942, he returned to England to take command at RAF Harrowbeer and then Bolt Head. In February 1943, he was added to the already full strength of 602 City of Glasgow Sqd, leading the squadron escorting bombers. Later that year, he took command of 118 Sqd at RAF Coltishall and led them for six months. He returned to an Operational Training role, and then took command of 286 Wing in Italy. After the war, he remained connected to the RAF until 1954, and then went into the business world. He died in 2010.

Joined 74 Sqd 1938-10-29 from No 8 FTS. He was an 'A' Class Reservist and the first to join the Tigers. Made a forced landing 1940-07-10 after battle damage to Spitfire (K9863) whilst attacking some 26 Dorniers escorted by fighters over a convoy near Dover. DFC 1940-07-31. He shot down Bf 110 on 11 September 1940 from II Gruppe of ZG 76 which crashed off Dungeness with its crew were picked up by the German rescue outfit, Seenotdienst. 1 December 1919 – 28 August 2010

Wikipedia Bio



Hurricanes of No 32 Squadron and Spitfires of No 74 Squadron engaging Messerschmidt Bf 110s over the Kent coast. Freeborn's aircraft ZP-C is shown on the cover artwork.


44 GearAlan WalterSgt144002RAFVRBritish32Sqn

DFC
Hurricane3Survived war22nd May 2003Born on 2nd February 1916. Joined RAFVR in April 1939. Called up 20th September 1939, he was posted to 8 FTS Woodley on 23rd October. Whilst there he had a motor cycle acciden. 16th May 1940 to 9 EFTS Ansty for a refresher course. Posted to 12 FTS Grantham. To 5 OTU Aston Down on 17th September. Joined 32 Sqd at Acklington on 3rd October 1940. He stayed with the squadron until 18th October 1941 when he was posted to CFS Upavon for an instructors course. Gear instructed at 9 FTS Hullavington on Masters from 15th December 1941 until 15th July 1942. He then went to 58 OTU Balado Bridge for a few weeks, finally settling at 9(P)AFU Errol where he instructed FAA pupils on the Swordfish, Albacore and Walrus. 18th October 1942 Gear posted to 72 Sqd at Ouston and went with it to North Africa in November. On 10th December Gear damaged a Ju88, this was probably the one reported lost by KG60 on that day. He claimed a Ju87 destroyed on 5th January 1943, damaged a Me109 on 11th April and claimed one destroyed on 22nd April. Commissioned from Warrant Officer on 11th January 1943, awarded the DFC (gazetted 27th July 1943) and posted away from 72 on 14th October 1943 to become a test pilot at 59 RSU Foggia. Early January 1944 he crashed after his engine failed and suffered severe injuries, including a broken back.



Signed envelope


45 GleaveThomas PercySqd Ldr29137RAFVRBritish253Sqn

CBE

Bronze Star (USA)

Legion d-Honneur (France)

Croix de Guerre (France)

MiD (x2)

Hurricane6Survived warJune 1993Born 6 September 1908. Educated at Westminster High School and Liverpool Collegiate School. In 1930 he was commissioned into the RAF where he excelled; by 1933 he was a member of the RAF aerobatic team. After a period as a flying instructor he joined RAF Bomber Command on 1 January 1939. He requested a return to RAF Fighter Command, which was granted. By June 1940 he was in command of 253 Sqd, flying Hurricanes. 1940-08-30 shot down four Bf 109s in a few seconds, one of whom was E.Arnold of III Gruppe JG 27. Command was handed to Squadron Leader H Starr in August 1940, but Gleave resumed command when Starr was shot down on 31 August. Gleave's tally by the time he was shot down was five Messerschmitt 109s (in a single day) and one Junkers 88. Gleave was shot down on his first sortie after restoration of his command, on 31 August 1940, and badly burned. Initially treated at Orpington Hospital, he regained consciousness underneath a bed during an air raid. His wife was called to his bedside and asked the heavily bandaged Gleave "what on earth have you been doing with yourself?" "I had a row with a German" was his characteristically laconic reply, and this became the title of the book he wrote under the pseudonym 'RAF Casualty', published in 1941. He was transferred to East Grinstead where McIndoe reconstructed his nose. He recovered sufficiently to be returned to non-flying duties and briefly commanded RAF Northolt before taking over RAF Manston, from where he dispatched the six Fairey Swordfish of 825 Squadron in their attempt to sink the Scharnhorst, Gneisenau and Prinz Eugen. He was then seconded to the planning group for what became Operation Overlord and promoted to Group Captain. He was made Group Captain Air Plans for the Allied Expeditionary' Air Force under Leigh-Mallory in November 1943. With Colonel Phillips Melville of the USAAF as co-operator he wrote the Overall Overlord Air Plan. For his outstanding work Gleave was made a CBE and awarded the US Legion of Merit, later changed to the Bronze Star because of protocol difficulties. He served as Eisenhower's Head of Air Plans at SHAEF from 1 October 1944 to 15 July 1945 and was then Senior Air Staff Officer, RAF Delegation to France, from 1945 to 1947.


Battle of Britain cover depicting Tom Gleave in a burning Hawker Hurricane of 253 Sqd after being shot at by Bf 109s while his squadron was attempting to engage German bombers attacking Biggin Hill. Gleave was Commanding Officer of the squadron at the time of being shot down having taken command of the squadron earlier in the day when the previous CO has been shot down and killed. The cover shows the famous Guinea Pig Club logo, which Tom Gleave was the vice-president and a founder member and referred to at the 'Chief Guinea Pig' the president of the Guinea Pig Club was Sir Archie McIndoe until his death, and then HRH Prince Philip accepted the position. The club was formed on 20th July 1941 at the Queen Victoria Hospital East Grinstead, it's members were the Guinea Pigs themselves, members of the medical staff and the friends and benefactors of the Guinea Pigs. Guinea Pig members were those who were referred to Queen Victoria Hospital for plastic surgery after being badly burnt in flying action. Plastic was a new type of procedure hence the term Guinea Pig and the procedure allowed many airmen to return to a more normal life and many returned to operations. The Guinea pig logo consists of a Guinea Pig with RAF wings. The Cover bears a 22p Lord Tedder / Typhoon stamp and is cancelled with BFPS 2641 postmark on 20 July 2001 which bears the Guinea Pig Logo and marks the 60th Anniversary of the formation of the Guinea Pig Club. Cover is signed by Flight Lieutenant J P B Greenwood who was a Battle of Britain Pilot with 253 Hurricane Squadron from October 1939 through until December 1940.


Signed envelope: Christopher Foxley-Norris, Tom Gleave, Ginger Lacey, Geoffrey Page, Sandy Johnston, Mieczysław Sawicki


3D Promotional card for collectors


46 GnyśWladysławPlt OffP-1298PAFPolish302Sqn Polish

316Sqn Polish

317Sqn Polish

Virtuti Militari

DFC

Krzyz Walecznych (x3)

Medal Lotniczy (x2)

Croix de Guerre (France)

Wound Badge
Hurricane3Died2002-02-28First Allied victor in Polish campaign 1939-09-01. After training on British equipment, he was sent on July 28 1940 to 302 Sqd. During July 28. - 31.10.1940 took active part in the Battle of Great Britain. On January 30, 1942, he was released from combat operations. From December 22, 1942, he again began to conduct combat flights in 302 Sqd. In February 1943 he became commander of 316 Sqd and from August 28, 1943 in 309 Sqd. In August 1944 he became the commander of 317 Sqd. On 27.08.1944 in the first combat flight which he performed as a squadron commander, he was shot down by the German Army. in the Rouen region of France. Wounded he gets captured. Sent to a prisoner-of-war assembly point in Amiens - he escaped and reached England with the help of the French resistance. After convalescence he served in RAF Fighter Command. After demobilization he went to Canada. In 1999, he was awarded the Commander's Cross with the Star of the Order of Rebirth. Polish (PR II *) - he died in St. Catherines ON Canada - buried at the Mount Osborne Cemetery in Beamsville Canada Age 90


Cover artwork by Tony Theobald shows a Fokker EV in Polish markings in 1919 which scored the Polish Air Force's first victory which was against the hostile Russians, the PZL IIc of 2nd Lt W Gnys who scored the first and second victories over the Luftwaffe on 1 September 1939, a Hawker Hurricane of No 303 Squadron during the Battle of Britain and a Supermarine Spitfire IX in D-Day invasion markings and Polish markings. Underneath a Polish built MiG 29 is shown to mark the new independent Polish Air Force after years of Soviet rule. The cover bears Polish Air Force 1918 - 1998 logo and the insignia of the 121st squadron, No 303 Squadron, No 316 Squadron and 1st Fighter Regiment which corresponds to the aircraft on the artwork.
Archiwum Database
Allied Losses Database
Review of Biography


47 GrayTrevorPlt Off85236RAFVRBritish64Sqn

Spitfire0.5Survived war21st January 2012.Born 10 July 1916. Joined the RAFVR July 1938 as an Airman u/t Pilot. Called up 1 September 1939. Commissioned at the end of his course in August 1940. Converting to Spitfires at 7 OTU Hawarden, joined 64 Sqd at Leconfield on 16 September. On 21 December 1940 Gray shared a Do17 over the English Channel. Posted to 58 OTU at Grangemouth on 3rd April 1941 as an instructor. No further service details until his release from the RAF in 1946 as a Flight Lieutenant.



Signed envelope

48 GreenwoodJohn Peter BowtellPlt Off41920British253Sqn

Hurricane3Survived war31st December 2014.Born 3 April 1921 in Stratford, East London England. Educated at Tiffins School, Kingston-on-Thames. Short service commission in the RAF in February 1939. Training at 11 E&RFTS Perth. In April to 2 FTS Brize Norton. Joined 253 Sqd at Manston on 30 October 1939. 253 Squadron was formed at Manston in Kent in November 1939 from part of the course of 2FTS Brize-norton, nearly all the pilots have been trained on Airspeed Oxfords, and had no fighter training at all as they were supposed to be equipped with Bristol Blenheims as bomber pilots. They eventually received Hurricane 1 aircraft in January 1940, and began to learn how to use them as fighters. They were very old planes as each existing Hurricane squadron gave them two of their aircraft, so of course they were the worst they had. 253 Sqd moved to Northolt, then Kenley and when the Germans invaded France, 253 were split into two flights, one went to Vitry and the other to Lille. Greenwood was in 'B' flight and went to Lille, the CO and Adjutant remained in England. 'B' flight was the only flight without armour plating and mirrors, also had the inferior single blade wooden airscrew. They were in France for four days in which they lost half their pilots including the flight commander. Only 3 aircraft flew back to the UK, the rest were broken up with axes. In four days John shot down a Bf109 and a Dornier 215, and a week later another Bf109 on escort duties over Merville. With their CO posted as missing 253 Squadron was without any leaders since the other flight at Vitry had lost its Flight Commander and half the pilots. 253 Squadron reformed in the north of the UK moving several times and changing COs, until eventually they entered the Battle of Britain, flying their first sortie from Kenley on 30 August 1940. 30 August destroyed a He111 attacking Farnborough. Posted to 5 FTS Sealand in December 1940 as an instructor. In February 1941 to Turnhouse, where 59 OTU was being formed. Volunteered for the Merchant Ship Fighter Unit, joined the unit at Speke on 20 May 1941. Onboard Empire Flame on 18 June. One Atlantic and one Russian convoy without launching his Hurricane. Following November he was posted to 55 OTU Usworth. To 615 Sqd at Fairwood Common in February 1942. To India in March. Flew its first operation on 5 December 1942. In January 1943 posted to 17 Sqd at Alipore as a Flight Commander. He went to 151 OTU Risalpur in April. Caught malaria and dengue fever in October. Posted to 223 Group at Peshawar. Joined 9 Sqd (Indian Air Force) February 1944 and in July went to a job in the War Room at 221 Group.


Signed envelope

MSFU Hurricane on ship

Greenwood Bio


49 GregoryAlbert EdwardSgt (later Sqd Ldr)133005RAFVRBritish141Sqn

219Sqn

23Sqn

605Sqn

275Sqn

278Sqn

52Sqn

DFC

Air Efficiency

BlenheimSurvived war12th November 2010Born in Derby England 9 May 1917. Joined the RAFVR April 1939 as an Airman u/t WOp/AG. Called up 1 September. To Aldergrove in October for an air gunnery course. December joined 141 Sqd at Grangemouth to fly in Blenheims. When 141 began to convert to Defiants in April 1940 he was too tall for the turret so joined 219 Sqd still using Blenheims. As radar-equipped Beaufighters began service from September 1940, retrained as a Radio Observer. Assisted in the destruction of a He111 in March 1941. In May to No. 2 Radio School at Yatesbury for a wireless operators course. Joined 23 Sqd at Ford in December 1941. He flew from Tangmere in Boston IIIs on intruder patrols over France, Belgium and Holland, bombing and strafing airfields, marshalling yards and other targets. On 2nd April 1942 he damaged two Do17s. July 1942 to a Gunnery Leaders course at CGS Sutton Bridge, completed in August then commissioned. To 605 Sqd at Ford on intruder duties. Posted to 275 Sqd (Air Sea Rescue) at Valley in Wales in March 1943. DFC 13th July 1943. Served with 278 Sqd (Air Sea Rescue) and was released from the RAF in November 1945 as a Flight Lieutenant. He rejoined in July 1947, did a radio refresher course and in February 1948 he was posted to 52 Sqd at Changi, Singapore engaged in anti-terrorist operations, supporting the Army in Malaya. Late 1950 returned to the UK and became a signals instructor. Retired from the RAF in May 1955.


Plate from 'Men Of The Battle Of Britain' by Ken Wynne


50 HaineRichard CumminsPlt Off43147RAFBritish25Sqn

600Sqn

488Sqn RNZAF (CO)

OBE

DFC

Blenheim2Survived war30 Sep 2008Born in Gloucester on 1 October 1916. Crypt Grammar School. Joined the RAF in 1936 and qualified as a fighter pilot. 25 Sqd flying the Hawker Fury. Flew in the first night patrol of the RAF in the war, in a Blenheim from RAF Northolt on 4 September 1939. These night flights rarely intercepted any aircraft, primarily due to the absence of onboard radar. On 28 November 1939, Haine flew one of six Blenheims of 25 Sqd to attack a seaplane base at Borkum, the first fighter attack of the war on German territory. He may have destroyed a Heinkel He 59 on the water. On 10 May 1940, Haine led six Blenheims of 600 Sqd against a key airfield at Waalhaven against an incipient landing by German Junkers Ju 52 transport aircraft and parachute troops. The raid was a disaster; five of the six aircraft were shot down upon arrival. Only one Blenheim returned safely to base. Haine and his gunner destroyed a Messerschmitt Bf 109 in the air and two Ju 52s on the ground before being shot down. They evaded capture and returned to England aboard HMS Hereward, the same Royal Navy destroyer that was evacuating the government of Norway and Queen Wilhelmina. DFC for the action. He served as the commanding officer of 488 Squadron RNZAF, flying the de Havilland Mosquito, until the end of November 1944. Haine and his squadron flew beachhead patrols on D-Day. Over Normandy on the night of 4 August he destroyed a Junkers Ju 88. On a patrol of Caen, during the night of 1 September, the squadron intercepted and shot down another. However, his claim for having made two kills while flying the Mosquito was reduced when the second Ju 88 was not credited to him.


Signed envelope

51 HairsPeter RaymondPlt Off76316RAFVRBritish501Sqn

276Sqn

MBE

Air Efficiency

MiD

Hurricane1.5Survived war24th August 2014 Age 99Born 10 July 1915 in Thornton Heath, Surrey England. Joined RAFVR January 1938 as an Airman u/t Pilot. Training at 19 E&RFTS Gatwick. To 6 FTS Little Rissington October 1939. Commissioned. On 28 December 1939 posted to 11 Group Pool St. Athan. Converted to Hurricanes. Joined 501 Sqd at Tangmere on 25 January 1940. Flew to France on 10 May. 14 May damaged a Do17 and shared in destroying another on the 15 May. Me109 destroyed on 5 September. Acquired the final polish at RAF Hawkinge by August 1940. With a shared victory scored in France, he was a case in point when no sooner pilots had taxied in than they slumped forward in their cockpits, as dead to the world as men under morphia. 'After eight scrambles in a day, you came up to write up your log book, and you just couldn't remember, beyond putting down the number of times you'd been up ... you couldn't remember at all.' He was posted to 15 EFTS Kidlington on 13 October 1940 as a flying instructor. To 2 CFS Cranwell for an instructors course on 23 February 1941 after which he moved to 11 FTS Shawbury on 14 April to instruct. 10 EFTS Weston-Super-Mare in May. Posted to Canada on 13 June as an instructor and assistant CFI. Mid-December 1943 returned to the UK and joined 276 Sqd Air Seaa Rescue at Harrowbeer. 5 May 1944 to 19 OTU Kinloss as OC Bomber Defence Training Flight. To India on 18 July 1945 on administrative duties. Released from the RAF on 30 October 1945 as a Flight Lieutenant. Mention in Despatches 14 June 1945. MBE 1 January 1946.


Signed envelope

52 HancockNorman EdwardPlt Off83266RAFVRBritish65Sqn

152Sqn

128Sqn

198Sqn

56Sqn

276Sqn (CO)

DFC
SpitfireSurvived war17th December 2008Born 12 May 1920 in Burgess Hill England. Joined RAFVR July 1939 as an Airman u/t Pilot. Called up 1 September 1939. To No. 1 ITW at Cambridge on 5 September. To 12 EFTS Prestwick on 26 March 1940 and then to 5 FTS Sealand on 26 May. To 7 OTU Hawarden on 11th August for Spitfire conversion. Joined 65 Sqd at Turnhouse on 2 September. To 152 Sqd at Warmwell on 11th October. Probable Me110 off the Isle of Wight on 28 November. To 56 OTU Sutton Bridge on 22 October 1941 as an instructor and went to 55 OTU Usworth on 2nd February 1942. To Northern Ireland on 11 July 1941 to instruct the 52nd Pursuit Group USAAF on Spifires. Returned to operations on 18 October 1942 in 128 Sqd at Hastings, Sierra Leone, as a Flight Commander. Back in the UK, to 198 Sqd at Matlask on 27 April 1943. 15 July to 56 Sqd at Martlesham Heath as a Flight Commander. 31st May 1944 to 85 Group. DFC 23rd June 1944. In May 1945 he took command of 276 Sqd Air Sea Rescue at Knocke. Then Squadron Leader Admin at RAF Cranfield. Released from the RAF in March 1946.
53 HarveyLeslie WalterSgtBritish54Sqn

245Sqn

601Sqn

94Sqn

567Sqn

695Sqn

595Sqn

290Sqn (CO)

SpitfireSurvived warNovember 2002Born in 1920. Joined RAFVR October 1938 as an Airman u/t Pilot. Called up on 1 September 1939. Training at 8 EFTS and 10 FTS before going to 5 OTU Aston Down in early August 1940. He crashed in Master N7781 on the 6 August, unhurt. Joined 54 Sqd at Hornchurch on 22 August. To 245 Sqd at Aldergrove on 22 September. Broke leg in a motorcycle accident and did not return to flying till July 1941 Posted as an instructor to 56 OTU. August 1941 posted to 601 Sqd on Airacobras at Duxford. In November posted to 94 Sqd on Hurricanes in North Africa on sweeps and top cover escort to bombers. As top cover on a sweep by 260 Sqd on 14th January 1942 bounced by Me109s over Agedabia and set alight by cannon fire. Baled out with burns at 1,000 feet and was picked up by Army unit 11th Hussars. May 1942 posted to a Aircraft Delivery Unit. Commissioned from Warrant Officer in April 1944 and posted back to UK the following month. Posted to 567 Sqd an AA Co-Op unit. During July and October he received a number of postings to 695 and 595 Squadrons. In January 1945 he was posted to 290 Sqd and took command in October 1945. Released from the RAF in 1946 as a Flight Lieutenant.


Signed by Ken Wilkinson (616 Sqd), Vivian Snell (501 Sqd), Ken Mackenzie (501 Sqd), Les Harvey (54 Sqd)


54 HawCharltonSgt (Later Sqd Ldr)RAFVRBritish504Sqn

81Sqn

611Sqn (CO)

129Sqn (CO)

65Sqn (CO)

DFC

DFM

Order of Lenin
DFM
Hurricane3Died 1993 UKBorn 8 May 1920 in York. Aged 10 joy-ride with Sir Alan Cobham's Flying Circus which set him on the road to flying. Joined RAFVR in February 1939 as an Airman u/t Pilot and began his training at 4 E&RFTS Brough. Called up on 1 September 1939, posted to 4 ITW Bexhill in October and in Decembe 1939r he went to 5 FTS Sealand. On No. 45 Course 11 December 1939 to 10 June 1940. Posted to 6 OTU Sutton Bridge but went directly to 504 Sqd. at Wick. On 27 September 1940 He destroyed a Bf110 but was shot down in Hurricane P3415 over Bristol, landing at Gammons Farm, Kilmington near Axminster, unhurt. In late July 1941 'A' Flight of 504 was renumbered as 81 Sqd and posted to Leconfield. Flown to Abbotsinch in Harrows and embarked on the aircraft carrier HMS Argus for Russia, with a cargo of crated Hurricanes. On 1 September 1941 flew off in sixes for Vaenga airfield, near Murmansk. A convoy carrying crated Hurricanes sailed on to Archangel, 400 miles to the east, as did the Llanstephan Castle, a liner bearing some 500 wing personnel. Fifteen aircraft were assembled at Archangel and then flown to Vaenga. At first the Rolls-Royce Merlins performed poorly, owing to the lower-octane Russian fuel. The British company Broquet Fuel corrected the problem by adding a catalyst. On 12 and 17 September 1941 destroyed two Bf109s and a third later in the month. Operations continued until mid-November, when pilots of the squadron began converting Russian pilots to Hurricanes. 81 Sqd left Russia on 29 November 1941, leaving all equipment behind and returned in HMS Kenya, landing at Rosyth on 7 December. Awarded DFM 23 January 1942 and the Order of Lenin on 31 March 1942), one of four given to RAF pilots by the Russians. 81 Squadron went to Turnhouse, where it received Spitfire Vbs. Commissioned in March 1942 and posted to 122 Sqd at Hornchurch. On 17 February 1943 given command of 611 Sqd at Biggin Hill. On 21 April 1943 sent on a tour of factories, speaking to workers. In July he was posted to the Fighter Leaders School at Milfield. In November 1943 he returned to operations when he took command of 129 Squadron at Hornchurch. In April 1944 129 converted to Mustangs. After covering the D-Day landings, Haw led the squadron in July and August in an offensive against flying bombs. Finally, as leader of a wing of long-range Mustang fighters, he escorted Allied bombers on daylight raids. In July 1944 he returned to the Fighter Leaders School. DFC gazetted 17th October 1944. Posted to Wittering in October 1944, to a unit which became the Central Fighter Establishment and moved to Tangmere in December 1944. Commanded 65 Sqd from 1946 to 1948. Permanent commission in 1948, he later lost his flying category because of an eyesight problem and retired from the RAF on 19th September 1951 as a Flight Lieutenant, retaining the rank of Squadron Leader.


Signed envelope

55 HaylockRobert ArthurSgtRAFVRBritish236Sqn

Air Efficiency

BlenheimSurvived warBrighton 17th March 2006Born Bury St Edmunds England 20 July 1921. Educated at East Anglian School and Culford School. Joined the RAFVR June 1939 as an Airman u/t Pilot. Called up 1 September 1939. Joined 236 Sqd at St. Eval September 1940 escorting Fleet Air Arm torpedo aircraft attacking enemy shipping in the Channel, and reconnaissances of German submarine bases and the Channel ports, plus searching for the long range Focke Wulf Condors harassing convoys. Plus convoy-escorts out into the Atlantic. Early 1941 converted to Beaufighters at RAF Chivenor and joined 272 Sqd. In May the squadron flew to the Middle East via Gibraltar and Malta. Initially based at Abu Sueir, 272 later moved to Mersa Matruh. Its main duty was to strafe enemy airfields but it also covered Tobruk convoys and made occasional operational visits to Malta. On 29th September 1941, flying from Malta, Haylock damaged two E-boats and two Cant Z501 flying boats. Late 1941 returned to the UK and was posted as a test pilot to Boscombe Down. Commissioned in early 1942. Test duties at Boscombe Down until his release from the RAF in December 1945 as a Flight Lieutenant.



56 HayterJames Chilton Francis 'Spud'Fg Off36207RAFNew Zealander605Sqn

615Sqn

DFC & Bar

MiD


Hurricane9SafeDied on the 03rd October 2006, age 88 and cremated at Wakapuaka Cemetery, Nelson, New ZealandBorn in Timaru, New Zealand 18 October 1917. Nelson College from 1928 to 1934. Working on farms and sheep stations, flying lessons with the Marlborough Aero Club as money and time allowed. 1938 he joined RNZAF, training at Wigram. To UK in July 1938 to join 98 Sqd a light bomber unit with Fairey Battles. November 1939 posted to 103 Sqd in France, flying Battles on reconnaissance. 12 May 1940 flew one of three Battles sent to attack river bridges and roads near Sedan. After shaking off some attacking Bf 110s, the three aircraft flew along the River Meuse in line astern to attack a German pontoon bridge with their gunners firing at enemy troops along the banks. The successful bombing of the bridge held up the advance of German tanks for some hours. Shot down 16 June 1940 by a Bf 109 as he was about to land and later on the same day the unit was withdrawn to England. In early September Hayter volunteered for Fighter Command and joined 615 Sqd moving two weeks later to 605 Sqd. October 1940 damaged a Ju 88 and two Bf 109s. 26 October 1940 he was attacked at 25000 feet and Hurricane I set on fire. Slightly wounded, Hayter baled out of his Hurricane I (P2916) after combat with a Bf 109 at 15:45hrs. Landed in the grounds of a house where a cocktail party was taking place. Invited to join it and was later picked up by his fiancée, who lived not far away. DFC October 1941, Bar to the DFC in January 1945. Returning to New Zealand in September 1945 to resume farming.

“Spud” Hayter was born in the port town of Timaru, South Island, New Zealand—in 1917. He took private flying lessons at Marlborough, and joined the Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) in 1938 on a short service commission. While flying as an “observer” in a Vickers Vildebeest, he crashed on two occasions, but avoided major injury. With war looming, he sailed for England in July 1939, and was posted to 98 Sqd at RAF Hucknall, flying the Fairey Battle. In November, he crashed again after some low flying, but escaped injury for the third time. He was posted to 103 Sqd in France. During the Battle of France he was shot down on 16 June, attempting to land. Shortly thereafter, the squadron and the hapless Battles were withdrawn to England. He volunteered for Fighter Command, joining 605 County of Warwick Sqd (after a brief assignment to 615 Sqd) in September. By the end of the month, he had been shot down again—this time, descending from 25,000 feet by parachute, he landed on the grounds of an estate where a cocktail party was in progress—and was invited forthwith. After 605, he was rested as a flying instructor starting 1 May 1941. However, he was on board during two separate crash landings (by the same student pilot) and he was made operational again (finding no rest in instructing!) He joined 611 Sqd, continuing to increase his score, but crash-landing his damaged Spitfire yet again (his eighth crash). He was awarded his first DFC and was given command of 247 Sqd in North Africa. Following this he instructed Turkish pilots on the Hurricane then joined 74 Sqd in Iran and Egypt, then back to France, leading the “Tigers” against the Germans until the end of 1944. When Cuthbert Orde sketched his portrait in 1941, he said this of Hayter: “... tough, steady and a damn good type. He is one of the chaps who make me grin when I meet them.” He survived the war and eight crashes and died in 2006 in the small farming town of Takaka, New Zealand near the southern shores of Golden Bay..

Some details here



57 HeimesLeopold 'Pol'Sgt1299983Belgium235Sqn

BlenheimSurvived war26 June 2009This man led an extraordinary life. Read the Obituary for details

Leopold Heimes was born on 30 August 1916 at Merbes-le-Château, near Thuin. At the start of the war on 10 May 1940, F/S (gunner) Heimes is posted to 5th Squadron, III Group, 2nd Aero Regiment based at Nivelles which operates Hispano (engined ?) Fairey Foxes. The squadron moves to the emergency landing grounds at Vissenaken (just west of Tienen/Tirlemont) and then Aalter (between Brugge and Gent), flying from the latter a recce. mission with Adjt. Renard. On 15 May the squadron falls back to France, first to St Omer and then successively to Dreux, Tours and eventually Maugio, near Montpellier. On 21 June he joins a party of pilots and gunners who wish to convert to twin-engined aircraft at Bordeaux. But the instructors have scampered away! Meanwhile France has signed an armistice. The Belgians desperately wanting to continue the fight in England embark on the M.V. ‘Ettrick’ in St Jean-de-Luz, together with Poles and Czechoslovakias, they reach Plymouth on 27th June. A little later in early July, 124 airmen and candidates are grouped together in England. Only 29 among them are deemed combat-ready. 15 pilots are spread among Fighter Command squadrons flying Hurricanes. The others – pilots, observers and gunners – go to Coastal Command.Leopold Heimes is posted on 25 August to 235 Squadron as a gunner operating on Blenheims. He flies with Lejeune (pilot) and Michiels (observer). In the same unit, he mixes with Dejace, Dieu DFC, Demoulin, Gonay DFC, Javaux, Kirkpatrick, Lascot, Prévot DFC, Roman DSO DFC, Van Waeyenberghe and Venesoen DFC. He takes part in the Battle of Britain while engaged in numerous convoy escort missions and patrols over the Atlantic and the Channel. On 20 September, he is transferred to 272 Squadron at Aldergrove, Northern Ireland, from where he continues flying until April 1941, by which time he is part of a batch of trainee-pilots with Venesoen and Michiels. They receive their ‘wings’ in July 41.



Obituary by David Mole

58 HilkenClive GeoffreySgt745482RAFVRBritish74Sqn
Air Efficiency Award

SpitfireWIAPoW Survived war30th June 2005 bronchial pneumonia and heart failureWounded 20 October 1940. Baled out Spitfire II (P7426) after combat with Bf 109 over South London at 15:00hrs. PoW 27 June 1941 when he was shot down over St Omer.

Born 14 September 1919 Hull England. Joined RAFVR March 1939 as a pilot under training. Called up 1 September that year. Training at 5 FTS and 6 OTU. Posted to 74 Sqd on 21 August 1940 as a Spitfire pilot. Mid-October 1940 the squadron moved from Kirton-in-Lindsey to Biggin Hill. Shot down on 20 October over south London and he baled out, wounded, his aircraft P7426 coming down at Cowden, Kent. After parachuting into an orchard, the pilot was confronted by a farmer armed with a shotgun who thought he was a German. Orpington Hospital for treatment. Baled out from Spitfire P7614 shot down by Me109s on 21 April 1941 over Ashford. On 27 June 1941 he was shot down near St. Omer and taken prisoner. The squadron CO, JC Mungo-Park, was also lost on this sortie, being killed when his aircraft came down in Belgium. Badly wounded, he landed in a field and was just about to be rescued by French villagers when he was set upon by enemy soldiers. Hilken remembers: 'Having twice survived being shot down….I swore that no enemy would get on my tail again without my knowledge. This resolution held good until 27 June 1941 when I flew to France as top cover, escorting a bombing sortie to the Lille district. The chap who should have been behind me had not taken off because of engine trouble, leaving me as the back man of my section. At 2,500 feet over France our squadron became separated on a weaving turn from the other squadrons of the Wing. Our CO applied full throttle in an attempt to regain his place in the formation but in the process the rest of us found ourselves spread over the sky up to two miles behind the main formation. Now, to weave and watch your tail meant losing the formation. The only way to catch up was to do what our CO had done – go full bore. We did this – then cannon shells whipped into my Spitfire. No warning. Nothing seen. Wireless dead, glycol streaming out behind. Elevator stuck and a piece of metal in my ankle which was bleeding at full speed. I bailed out only to find my parachute pack waving about by my side. I pulled it in and undid the snap fasteners, letting the chute out a yard or two before the wind caught it and it opened to let me down, cursing my fate yet again, to France, hospital and a POW camp.' Released from the RAF 1945 as Warrant Officer. After the war Hilken turned to teaching.

59 HoneDouglas HaroldPlt Off (later Flt Lt)80816RAFBritish615Sqn

41Sqn

501Sqn

Hurricane0.5WIASurvived warOctober 2003Wounded crash landed at Rochford 26 August 1940 at 15:40hrs. Hurricane I (V6564) had been shot up by a Bf 109.

Born Purley, England 30 September 1917. Joined RAFVR in September 1938 as an Airman u/t Pilot. Training at 19 E&RFTS Gatwick. Posted to No. 1 ITW Cambridge on 11 November 1939. On 30 December to 12 FTS Grantham. 6 OTU Sutton Bridge on 3 June 1940 for conversion to Hurricanes. Joined 615 Sqd at Kenley on 6 July. First operation on 19 July. Shared a He59 on 27 July, a Do17 destroyed on 29 July. Attacked by a Hurricane on 14 August but managed to land at Kenley. On 20 August shared a Do17. Fighting a formation of Do17s on 24 August his glycol tank was damaged by return fire he had to crash-land in a field at Meopham, uninjured but. 26 August wounded in the leg and thigh by cannon shell splinters when attacked by a Me109. To Southend Hospital. 20 September back with the squadron at Prestwick. 26 February 1941 was shot down by Me109s and crashed at Tenterden, suffering concussion and bleeding eyes. Posted to 56 OTU Sutton Bridge on 9 July as an instructor. Wheels-up landing on 14 August near River Nene after a bird-strike on a goose. 61 OTU Rednal in April/May 1942. Joined 41 Sqd at Merston. In the Dieppe operation on 19 August he damaged a Fw190. Posted to 501 Sqd at Hawkinge on 1 September 1943 followed by a posting as a Controller on 3rd January 1944. Released from the RAF in April 1946 as a Flight Lieutenant. After serving as a Controller in the RAFVR he rejoined the RAF in July 1950, serving in the Fighter Control Branch. He retired on 30th September 1975.



60 Hooper-SmithLawrence Edward (Laurence ?)Flt LtRAFVRBritish234Sqn

559Sqn

Air Efficiency Award
SpitfireSurvived war9 February 2008 JerseyBorn 1918 as Smith, changing to Hooper-Smith at an unknown time. Joined RAFVR at Kidlington on 11 November 1938 as an Airman u/t Pilot. Full-time service in September 1939. Posted to 3 ITW Hastings in December, moved to 4 EFTS Brough on 3 March 1940. Finished training at 14 FTS Cranfield from 12 May to 28 September. Posted to 7 OTU Hawarden on the 29 September. Converting to Spitfires joined 234 Sqd at St. Eval on 15 October 1940. Posted to 53 OTU Llandow on 8 July 1941. Commissioned in October, attached to CFS Upavon for an instructors course from 17 November and then returned to Llandow. 10 March 1942 moved to 59 OTU at Crosby-on-Eden. 11 August posted to 559 Sqd at Brunton. He continued instructing at various units and specialised in refresher flying training. Stanford Tuck was his pupil after his return from PoW. Released from the RAF in late 1945 as a Flight Lieutenant. Rejoined RAFVR in May 1947 and was instructing at Nottingham University Air Squadron. Smith joined the Royal Auxiliary Air Force, serving with a fighter control unit until November 1963.
61 Howard-WilliamsPeter IanPlt Off33569British19Sqn

610Sqn

118Sqn

276Sqn

DFC
Spitfire4.5Survived warMarch 1993.Born in Cowes, Isle of Wight England 27 December 1919. Educated at Felsted School. RAF College Cranwell on 27 April 1939 as a Flight Cadet. After the outbreak of war Cranwell cadets who had not completed their course were enlisted in the regular RAF on 7 September 1939 as Airmen u/t Pilots. Graduated on 7 March 1940 with a permanent commission. Joined 19 Sqd at Duxford on 17 March. With 610 Sqd in early 1941. February joined 118 Sqd. Moved to Pembrey in March and became operational on the 28 March 1941 on convoy patrols. Moved to Ibsley on 18 April 1941. 6 August destroyed a Me109, on 12 October he destroyed a Me109 and probably another and on the 15 October shared a Me109. DFC 4 November 1941. Flight Commander in early 1942. On 2 February 1942 he got a Me109 destroyed and two others damaged. Posted to 276 Squadron at Fairwood Common on air-sea rescue duties in March 1942. May 1942 he joined 2 Delivery Flight at Colerne, staying with it until February 1943. Rejoined 610 Sqd at Westhampnett. 11 March he shot down a Fw190 over the Channel. From April 1943 attached to 2 Squadron at Fowlmere on fighter-reconnaissance duties. He rejoined 610 Squadron in June 1943 at Perranporth. In November 1943 posted to 11 APC, moved to 11 FIS in March 1944, went to 57 OTU Eshott in April as an instructor, and then to 27 OTU Lichfield where he remained until March 1945, when he was posted to HQ 91 Group Abingdon. Retired from the RAF on 11 June 1958 as a Squadron Leader, retaining the rank of Wing Commander.


Signed cover

62 InnesRobert AlexanderSgt63784RAFVRBritish253Sqn

261Sqn

185Sqn

Air Efficiency Award

Hurricane2Survived war6th April 2005Born 15 June 1918. Joined RAFVR August 1938 as an Airman u/t Pilot. Called up 1 September 1939. Trained at 10 FTS Tern Hill. March 1940 posted to 6 OTU Sutton Bridge to convert to Blenheims. However he arrived at 253 Sqd on Hurricanes at Kenley, on 6 May 1940. Me110 destroyed on 30 August and on 15th September he shot down a Do17 of 8/KG2. Crashed in Hurricane V6736 on 20 September following an attack by Me109s over Maidstone. Crashed again at StapleBorn 15 June 1918. Joined RAFVR August 1938. Called up 1 September 1939. Trained at 10 FTS Tern Hill. March 1940 posted to 6 OTU Sutton Bridge to convert to Blenheims. However he arrived at 253 Sqd on Hurricanes at Kenley, on 6 May 1940. Me110 destroyed on 30 August and on 15th September he shot down a Do17 of 8/KG2. Crashed in Hurricane V6736 on 20 September, attacked by Me109s over Maidstone. Patrol on 11 October crashed in Hurricane L1666 from an unknown cause. He probably destroyed a Me109 off the coast of Essex on 11 November. Commissioned in March 1941. In April 1941 sailed on HMS Argus for Gibraltar. Transferred to HMS Ark Royal and flew off Ark for Malta. Joined 261 Sqd for a short period, transferring to 185 Sqd when that unit was formed at Hal Far from elements of 261 Sqd and 1430 Flight. During May and July 1941 his aircraft hit twice, the second time seriously. Sent home on HMS Edinburgh. After six months in hospital spent the rest of the war as an instructor. 1945 to the Central Flying School and then to Hornchurch. Returned to Malta in 1952 to reform 185 Sqd as the new commanding officer. Retired from the RAF on 31 August 1961 as a Squadron Leader.


Battle of Britain cover depicting Tom Gleave in a burning Hawker Hurricane of 253 Sqd after being shot at by Bf 109s while his squadron was attempting to engage German bombers attacking Biggin Hill. Gleave was Commanding Officer of the squadron at the time of being shot down having taken command of the squadron earlier in the day when the previous CO has been shot down and killed. Signed by Robert Innes

63 IvesonThomas Clifford 'Tony'Sgt128539British616Sqn

DFC
Spitfire5 November 2013.Born in York. Archbishop Holgate’s School. Joined RAFVR in 1938. First operational posting was to 616 Sqd on Spitfires, on 2 September 1940. Two weeks later he flew one of the aircraft scrambled to intercept a Ju 88 off Cromer. Sergeant Iveson’s aircraft was damaged and lost fuel, forcing him to ditch. He was picked up by a motor torpedo boat and landed at Yarmouth. In October he moved to 92 Sqd. Instructed in Southern Rhodesia, commissioned and undertook a second tour in Bomber Command. Converted to Lancasters at No 5 Lancaster Finishing School, Syerston and in July 1944 joined 617 Sqd. His operations with the squadron included three attacks on the battleship Tirpitz, including the one on 12 November 1944 that led to the ship sinking. On 12 January 1945, Iveson took part in a raid on shipping and the submarine base at Bergen, in Norway. The Lancasters were attacked by German fighters, and Iveson’s aircraft was badly damaged, with his port inner engine set on fire and his tailplane and rudders riddled with bullets. His two air gunners and wireless operator had already baled out when the the fighters suddenly broke off the attack. Iveson managed to fly the aircraft to Sumburgh, Shetland. He was awarded an immediate DFC. Left the RAF in July 1949 as a Flight Lieutenant. He later served in the RAuxAF and commanded a Light Anti-Aircraft Squadron.

Surviving aircrew born 1919. Crash landed Spitfire I (R6690) into the sea 16 September 1940 at 10:30hrs. Saved. after running out of fuel chasing a Ju 88 off Cromer.



64 JohnsonJames Edgar 'Johnnie'Plt Off83267British616Sqn

Order of the Bath

CBE

DSO & 2 Bars

DFC

SpitfireSurvived warBorn in Melton Mowbray on the 9 March 1915, a police inspector's son. Joined 616 Sqd in Spitfires on the 2 September 1940. Went on to become the RAF's leading ace.
65 JonesCyril Arthur TrevorPlt Off43693British611Sqn

312Sqn Czechoslovakia

616Sqn

79Sqn (CO)

DFC
Spitfire2Survived war2000s in AustraliaBorn in Burnley England 1914. Joined RAF in January 1936 as a direct-entry Airman u/t Pilot. With 66 Sqd at Duxford when commissioned on 1 April 1940. Joined 611 Sq at Digby on 17 April. 2nd June a probable Me109 over Dunkirk. On the 4 June detached to AFDU Northolt for an Air Fighting course. On 29 August 1940 posted to 312 Sqd as a Flight Commander. Moved to 616 Sqd at Kenley on 4th September again as a Flight Commander. Badly wounded in the right elbow by return fire from a He111 off Spurn Head on 5 November 1940. Returned safely to Kirton-in-Lindsey and was admitted to Scunthorpe Hospital. The enemy crashed into the Humber. From February 1942 until February 1944 Jones commanded 79 Sqd, mostly in India. On 15 December 1942 he destroyed a Japanese Army Type 99 bomber and damaged another. DFC 14th April 1944. Released from the RAF in 1946 as a Wing Commander.


Ft Lt Jones of 616 Sqd climbs out of his Spitfire (QJ-A) while a member of the ground staff refuels the aircraft, Fowlmere, September 1940. © IWM CH 1358


66 KaneTerence MichaelFg Off41185RAFBritish234Sqn

Spitfire1.5PoW5 August 2016, aged 95.Born in September 1920 in London. Finished school at Varndean County Grammar School, Brighton. Joined the RAF on a short service commission and began training in July 1938. He joined 9 Air Observer School, Penrhos on 27 September 1939, as a staff pilot. Period at RAF Farnborough undertaking high-altitude tests. He became an instructor. Converted to Spitfires and joined 234 Sqd at St Eval on 18 September. He shared in the destruction of a Ju 88 on the 22nd. The next day Kane did not return from a patrol. His Spitfire was damaged in combat off the French coast, after he had shot down a Bf 109, and he baled out at 6,000 ft. He was rescued and taken prisoner by the Germans. He was in several PoW camps, including Stalag Luft 3 in Lower Silesia. Freed in May 1945 and stayed in the RAF until 1950, when he went on to the Reserve of Air Force Officers. Rejoined in April 1954, in the Fighter Control Branch and retired on 29 May 1974 as a Wing Commander. PoW 23 September 1940 after crashing Spitfire I (R6896) off the coast of France at 11:00hrs after shooting down a Bf 109.


Signed envelope. Painting of Bob Doe's Spitfire by Ross Wardle

Obituary


Plate from 'Men Of The Battle Of Britain' by Ken Wynne

67 KeatingsJohn 'Bugs'Sgt591611British219Sqn

BlenheimSurvived war18th February 2010.Born Neston, Cheshire 8th July 1916. Service in Egypt and Palestine with Army. Early 1935 joined the RAF as an Aircrafthand. Posted to Northolt. His skill as a marksman meant he joined the RAF team at the shooting championships at Bisley. September 1935 joined 45 Sqd at Helwan, Egypt and started training as an Armourer/Air Gunner, making his first flight on 11th October. Posted to 6 Sqd at Ismailia. In December 1936 returned to the UK, posted to 21 Sqd at Lympne. He took part in the 1937 Hendon Air Display, flying in the mass formation of 250 aircraft. He went to No. 1 Air Armament School at Eastchurch in November 1937 to convert to Fitter-Armourer. Joined 269 Sqd at Abbotsinch in March 1939, a general reconnaissance unit with Ansons, on armament and flying duties. October 1939 posted to 219 Sqd, a night-fighter unit at Catterick. On 15th August 219 was scrambled to intercept 40+ He111's and Ju88's off Flamborough Head. Seven were shot down, with only one Blenheim damaged. It was a remarkable result. In December 1940 posted to CGS Warmwell as a gunnery instructor. He did not fly operationally again and he later became a Senior Armament Instructor at No. 1 AAS.


Signed envelope

68 KentJohn Alexander 'Johnnie'Sqd Ldr (later Grp Cpt)RAFCanadian303Sqn

92Sqn

Virtuti Militari

DFC

AFC
Hurricane13Died1985-10-07Born in Canada, Johnnie Kent spent most of his life in the United Kingdom. Became a pilot at 17 and held a commercial licence when he was 19. Joined the RAF in n1935 and flew Gauntlets with 19 Sqd. In September 1939 he joined 212 Sqd in France. His first victory was when a Bf 109 attacked him but could not pull out of its dive and went into the River Seine. There were no witnesses so he could not claim it. He became flight commander on Hurricanes with 303 Sqd Polish. So highly did the Poles regard Kent that they made him an honourary Pole and called him 'Kentowski'. He then commanded 92 Squadron on Spitfire I. In October 1940 he scored up his Squadron's 100th wartime victory.





69 KilmartinJohn Ignatius 'Killy'Fg Off39793Irish43Sqn

DFC
Hurricane13Survived war1998Despite the animosity many Republican Irishmen felt for the British, there were many who fought alongside them in the Second World War, and ten who fought in the Battle of Britain. John Kilmartin was born in 1913 in Dundalk, Ireland near the border with Northern Ireland. His father died when he was nine and he was shipped to Australia as part of a scheme to resettle poor and disadvantaged children. One can only imagine how he felt as he sailed to Australia where he worked on a cattle farm and later, in Shanghai, as a bank clerk and part-time jockey. He joined the RAF in 1937 and after training, was posted to 43 Sqd at RAF Tangmere in January 1938. With the war declared, he was posted to 1 Sqd and sent to France. During the Battle of France, flying Hawker Hurricanes, he quickly built up a score and was a double ace by the middle of May. The spent pilots of 1 Sqd were withdrawn to England at the end of May and 'Killy' was sent to train others for the coming Battle of Britain. He rejoined 43 Sqd at the beginning of September 1940, increasing his score during the Battle of Britain. He was awarded a DFC and gazetted on 8 October. In the spring of the following year, he was sent to command 602 Sqd, but that was short-lived. Instead, he went to West Africa, taking command of 128 Sqd in Sierra Leone to defend that country in the event that the Vichy French attacked from their bases in Dakar, Senegal to the north. He returned to Great Britain in August of 1942 to command 504 Sqd on Spitfires and then eventually the whole wing at RAF Hornchurch. In 1944, Kilmartin led the Typhoon wing of the Tactical Air Force. He was made an OBE in January 1945, went on to serve in Burma on P-47 Thunderbolts and then to Sumatra. The breadth of his war service spanned 6 years of the war and three continents. He remained in the RAF after the war, and held staff positions at NATO. He died in 1998.

Joined RAF before the war. Went to France with 1 Sqd at the start of hostilities. Score in France was 11 of which 6 were Bf 110s, 4 Bf 109s and a Ju 88. Flew with 43 Sqd during the Battle, shooting down a Bf 110 and a Bf 109 in September 1940.




70 LaneBrian John Edward 'Sandy'Flt Lt (later Sqd Ldr)37859RAFBritish66Sqn

213Sqn

19Sqn (CO)

167Sqn

DFC
Spitfire Vc AR612 VL-U6MIA1942-12-13 Age 25

Read Archive Report

Author of Spitfire!, published in 1942 under the pseudonym B.J. Ellan. one of a few autobiographical accounts of the life of a Battle of Britain Spitfire pilot. Leader of 19 Sqd from 5 September 1940. He helped two Hurricanes shoot down a Bf 110 on the 7th of September 1940 which crashed East of Hornchurch.

Born Pannal, Harrogate England 18 June 1917. Grew up in Pinner and attended St Paul’s School in Hammersmith before entering the RAF in 1936. Joined RAF in 1936. Training at 3 E&RFTS Hamble in March 1936, posted to No. 11 Flying Training School at RAF Wittering on 1 June. Commissioned 18 May 1936 on a short service commission. Joined 66 Sqd at RAF Duxford on 8 January 1937 at the rank of Pilot Officer. In June 1937 Lane moved to 213 Sqd at RAF Northolt. Promoted to Flying Officer on 23 December 1938. Joined 19 Sqd at RAF Duxford as an Officer Commanding "A" Flight, flying Spitfires. During the Dunkirk evacuation in May 1940 awarded DFC for his bravery, and his official rating as a fighter pilot classed "exceptional". He became acting squadron commander on 25 May 1940 when the incumbent commanding officer was shot down over Dunkirk. By September 1940, during the peak of the Battle of Britain, his abilities as a fighter pilot and leader were duly recognised, and he was promoted to squadron leader. 19 Sqd often operated with 242 Sqd and led by 242's Squadron Leader Douglas Bader, the squadrons often working together as part of the Duxford Wing, 12 Group's controversial "Big Wing" formation. After the Battle of Britain, continued with 19 Squadron until June 1941 when he was posted to the No. 12 Group RAF staff at RAF Hucknall. November 1941 Lane was posted on a staff appointment to the Middle East. In June 1942 returned to England to command No. 61 OTU at Mountford Bridge, until December 1942 when he joined 167 Squadron RAF at RAF Ludham as a supernumerary squadron leader flying the Spitfire Mk. V. First operational flight with the Squadron on 13 December 1942, during which he was last seen giving chase to two Focke-Wulf 190 fighters. He never returned from this mission and was listed as "missing in action". Most likely shot down over the North Sea. It is probable he was a victim of Oblt. Leonhardt of 6./JG 1 and crashed into the sea 30 km west of Schouwen 51.618°N 3.455°E at 16:34 hrs. 6 (and 1 shared) enemy aircraft shot down, 2 unconfirmed destroyed, 1 probable destroyed and 1 damaged. Runnymede


Pencil drawing by Steve Teasdale has been signed by 3 Battle of Britain Spitfire pilots from 19 Squadron. The signatures are : Gordon Sinclair, James Coward and David Cox. This image has become synonymous with the tired state of our brave pilots as they battled in the skies over England in 1940.

Son of Henry Fitzgerald William Lane (died 26th July 1958, age79) and of Bessie Elinor Lane (née Hall - died 22nd August 1963, age 86) and husband of Eileen Mary Lane (née Ellison - born 12th December 1910 - died at St Helier Hospital on the 29th July 1967 of cancer). Eileen Lane was a famous ladies British Grand Prix racing driver in the 1930s. Her main racing achievement came in 1932 when she won the Duchess of York's race for women drivers at Brooklands. The competitors included Elsie Wisdom (Invicta), Fay Taylour (Talbot 105) and Kay Petre (Daytona Wolseley Hornet Special). After a period of mourning, Ellison moved to South Africa around 1953 with wealthy landowner, Owen Fargus who lived in the same apartment complex as Eileen. (They never married) He owned property in the United Kingdom, in South Africa and Jersey and the couple led a jet-setting lifestyle. She remained with Fargus until her death then living at 'Boidec', La Marquanderie, St. Brelade St. Helier, Jersey.



Above: His wife, Eileen Mary Lane (Grand Prix racing driver)

71 LeeKenneth Norman Thomas 'Hawkeye'Fg Off72998RAFVRBritish501Sqn
DFC
HurricaneWIADied2008-01-15Born in Birmingham 23 June 1915. Joined RAFVR on 25 January 1937. In January 1939 was released by his employer to spend six months with the regular RAF. Joined 111 Sqd at Northolt. Commissioned March 1939 and went to 43 Sqd at Tangmere. 4th September 1939 joined 501 Sqd at Filton. Flew to France 10 May 1940 and immediately destroyed Bf110. Do17 on 12th and on the 13th a Bf110. Squadron withdrawn from France on 18 June, re-assembled at Croydon on 21 June. Because of his keen eyesight he was usually the first to spot the enemy earning him the name 'Hawkeye'. Destroyed a He111 destroyed on 27 May and a Do17 on 6 June. 10 June attacking He111s, his Hurricane was probably hit by return fire and exploded. He baled out and landed at Le Mans. In the scramble to be evacuated, Lee's right hand was injured and he did not fly for several weeks. Damaged a Ju87 on 29 July, destroyed another on 12 August. Wounded 18 August 1940 and baled out of Hurricane I (P3059) at 13:30hrs. He was one of four Hurricanes from the Squadron shot down over Canterbury by Gerhard Schöpfel of III Gruppe of JG 26 flying a Bf 109. Baled out, with a bullet wound in the leg, and landed in a cornfield near Whitstable and was taken to the local golf club to wait for an ambulance. Heavily bloodstained, he stood at the bar, where he overheard a man complaining 'The machine-gunning made me miss my putt. And who's that chap at the bar? Bad show, all that blood - I don't believe he's even a member'. Rejoined the squadron in October. DFC 22 October 1940. On 29 November posted to the Special Duties Flight at Stormy Down and later went to 52 OTU Crosby-on-Eden as a Flight Commander. In late 1941 posted to Africa to ferry fighters from the Gold Coast (now Ghana) to Egypt. Then joined 260 Sqd as a flight commander flying Kittyhawks. Moved to 260 Sqd on 18 September 1942. Destroyed a Macchi 202 on 10 November. Commanded 123 Sqd at Abadan, Persia in March 1943. Then went to the Western Desert in May. On 27 July 1943 he was shot down and captured on a dawn raid on Crete. Taken to Germany to Stalag Luft III. Helped in prfeparations for The Great Escape. 28 January 1945 the prison camp was evacuated. In deep snow and freezing temperatures, the 'Long March' westwards was a great ordeal; many men died of exhaustion before reaching overcrowded camps in the west. He eventually arrived back in England in early May.
Biography of Obituary

72 LeeRichard Hugh Antony 'Dickie'Flt Lt33208RAFBritish85Sqn

DSO

DFC
Hurricane9KIA1940-08-18Opened the score for 85 Sqd in World War II. He was Lord Trenchard's Godson. Born in London in 1917. Educated at Charterhouse School. Cranwell in September 1935 as a Flight Cadet and graduated in July 1937. On 1 June 1938 joined 85 Sqd at Debden. Went to France at the outbreak of war. He destroyed a He111 over Boulogne on 21 November 1939, 85s first victory. DFC 8 March 1940. On 10 May 1940 he claimed a Hs126 destroyed, shared a Ju86 and damaged a Ju88. On 11 May shot down two enemy then shot down by flak and captured. Escaped and made his way back to his squadron. Flying with 56 Sqd over Dunkirk on the 27 May shot down into the sea. Rescued. DSO 31 May 1940). Back with 85 Sqd in August 1940, last seen in pursuit of an enemy formation thirty miles off the east coast on the 18 August. Killed while on patrol on 18 August 1940. Lost in Hurricane I (2923) after chasing three Bf 109s off the east coast, at 17:50hrs. Runnymede Panel 6


Dickie Lee and Albert Lewis, good friends on 85 Sqn until Lee went missing during the Battle of Britain. Albert Lewis went on to become a high scoring ace during the war. The drawing by Steve Teasdale has been signed in pencil by the artist and 23 veterans of the Battle of Britain. The signatures are: Roy McGowan, Bob Doe, Wilf Sizer, Len Davies, Bob Foster, Vivian Snell, Terry Clark, Ken Lusty, Ken Wilkinson, Tom Neil, Jack Toombs, Albert Gregory, John Ellacombe, Robert Haylock, Ken Lee, Nigel Rose, Basil Stapleton, Jocelyn Millard, Arthur Piper, CE Smith, Keith Aldridge, Ben Bent and Bill Green. (Courtesy battleofbritainbooks.co.uk



73 LeggettPercival GrahamPlt Off86329RAFVRBritish245Sqn

46Sqn

145Sqn

96Sqn

249Sqn

73Sqn

32Sqn (CO)

Air Efficiency Award

Hurricane1.5Survived war26th May 2013Born 14 February 1921. Joined the RAFVR June 1939 as an Airman u/t Pilot. Called up 1 September 1939. Basic training then 5 OTU Aston Down in September 1940 for conversion to Hurricanes. 18 September crashed at Oldbury-on-Severn, Gloucestershire, unhurt. Joined 245 Squadron at Aldergrove on 28 September, then 46 Sqd at Stapleford on 18 October. Probable Fiat BR20 and shared another on 11 November. Posted to 145 Sqd in late November 1940 (?) and then 96 Sqd at Cranage on 18 December 1940. Late June 1941 joined 249 Sqd in Malta. Mc200 destroyed on 17 July. Shot down 21 December 1941, baled out and was admitted to hospital with slight abrasions. Joined 73 Sqd in North Africa in October 1942 until August 1943. Back in the UK, appointed Adjudant at RAF Kirton-in-Lindsey after which he served in Ceylon. In 1949 he became CO of 32 Sqd on Havilland Vampires from Cyprus. Station Commander Dyce 1956/57. Retired from the RAF on 23rd May 1958 as a Squadron Leader.
74 LeighArthur Charles 'Joe'Sgt111975RAFVRBritish64Sqn

72Sqn

DFC

DFM

Spitfire3.5Survived war2004-07-03Born in London in 1920. Joined the RAFVR in June 1939 to train as a pilot. He was called up at the outbreak of war. Posted to 7 OTU Hawarden on 31 August 1940. Converting to Spitfires he joined 64 Sqd at Leconfield. First operational sortie on 29 September 1940. Moved to 72 Sqd at Biggin Hill on 11 October. Then to 611 Sqd at Digby on 8 November 1940. He shared a Do 17 on 21 December. Shared in probably destroying a Bf 109 on 28 May 1941, destroyed a Bf 109. Probably another on 18 June. Probable Bf 109 on the 22nd, probably destroyed another and damaged a second on 4 July 1941, probably destroyed another on the 23rd and destroyed two more on 19 August and 4 September 1941. DFM on 9 September after part 50 sweeps over the continent. Commissioned and became an instructor. Posted to Gibraltar in April 1943, from where he ferried Hurricanes to Cairo. In early August he returned to the UK and joined 56 Sqd at Manston. He was shot down on his first sweep, by flak, near Calais. Leigh baled out into the Channel and was picked up by an ASR launch. In late 1943 he was posted to 129 Sqd at Hornchurch. DFC. After second tour, had another spell as an instructor. Released from the RAF. He later started a successful architectural hardware business in Norwich. He died on 3 July 2004.

75 LewisAlbert Gerald 'Zulu'Plt OffSouth African616Sqn

504Sqn

85Sqn

249Sqn

AFC & Bar
Hurricane17WIA1990Radar operator in Blenheims with 25 Sqd in the Battle of Britain. Later rose to the rank of Group Captain. AFC and bar and Polar Medal and had the Lewis Chain of rocky features in Antarctica named in his honour. Born in May 1922, attended Warwick School. Joined the RAFVR as an Aircrafthand in February 1940. Just after the Battle of Britain he was promoted to Sergeant and flew his first Beaufighter sortie. He later served in North Africa and trained as a pilot in Canada. He was granted a permanent commission in 1947. From May 1955 Lewis led the RAF party with the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition, under the leadership of Vivian Fuchs, who would receive a Knighthood. Lewis left for the Antarctic in November 1955 and returned to the UK in March 1956. He returned to the Antarctic in November 1956 and finally came home in August 1958. He was responsible for the purchase of aircraft and spares, organising and running air surveys and providing close support for the expedition party in the field. In January 1958 Lewis became the first person to make a Trans-Antarctic flight in a single-engined aircraft. He flew from South Ice to Scott Base on the Ross Sea.

Flew with 616 Sqd at the outbreak of hostilities and then moved to 504 Sqd fighting in France. Then moved to 85 Sqd still in France where he claimed 9 kills. Stayed with 85 Sqd until August and shot down two more Germans. Then joined 249 Sqd. 27 September he claimed 6 kills, two probables and one damaged. Baled out of Hurricane I (V6617) badly burned on the 28 September 1940 over Faversham at 14:20hrs.


Dickie Lee and Albert Lewis, good friends on 85 Sqn until Lee went missing during the Battle of Britain. Albert Lewis went on to become a high scoring ace during the war. The drawing by Steve Teasdale has been signed in pencil by the artist and 23 veterans of the Battle of Britain. The signatures are: Roy McGowan, Bob Doe, Wilf Sizer, Len Davies, Bob Foster, Vivian Snell, Terry Clark, Ken Lusty, Ken Wilkinson, Tom Neil, Jack Toombs, Albert Gregory, John Ellacombe, Robert Haylock, Ken Lee, Nigel Rose, Basil Stapleton, Jocelyn Millard, Arthur Piper, CE Smith, Keith Aldridge, Ben Bent and Bill Green. (Courtesy battleofbritainbooks.co.uk


Portrait by Eric Kennington
76 LustyKenneth Roy 'Lucky'Sgt66502RAFBritish25Sqn

BlenheimSurvived war18th September 2009Air gunner in Blenheims during the Battle. Nicknamed 'Lucky' after being attacked by a Ju 88 and surviving with the only damage being a bullet through his sleeve. Born in Sale, Cheshire England 9 February 1920. Joined the RAF as an Airman u/t Air Gunner on 4th September 1939. Training at Padgate. To gunnery course at RAF Aldergrove on 30th December. On 24 February 1940 joined 235 Squadron. Posted away on 14th May to 25 Sqd at North Weald. Retrained as a Radio Observer, commissioned May 1941. On 16 July he joined 1453 Flight at Wittering on Turbinlite Havocs. On 1st August 1942 rested. Returned to operations on 2 April 1943 in 410 Sqd (RCAF) at Drem on Beaufighters. To 406 Sqd (RCAF) Squadron at Predannack on 25th August. Then went to 264 Sqd at Fairwood Common on 9th October 1943. Sent to Staff College on 5 July 1944. To 132 Sqd at Vavuyina, Ceylon on 28th November 1944 as Adjutant. To BHQ Colombo on 23rd June 1945 as Senior Admin Officer. Released from RAF on 21st January 1946 as a Squadron Leader.


Signed envelope

Signed by Peter Rich, Noel Corry, Kenneth Lusty

77 MackenzieKenneth William 'Super Mac'Plt Off84017RAFVRBritish43Sqn

501Sqn

DFC

AFC

Hurricane8Survived war4 June 2009Baled out Hurricane I (V6806) safely on the 25 October 1940 after colliding with Hurricane I (P2903) of P/O V.Goth during combat with Bf 109s over Tentreden, Kent at 15:25hrs. Goth killed.

Born in Belfast Northern Ireland 8 June 1916. Educated at the Methodist College. In 1935 Mackenzie learned to fly at the Airwork School of Flying at Newtownards and was awarded Aero Certificate 12733 on 3rd May 1935. Early 1939 he joined the RAFVR as an Airman u/t Pilot and started training at 24 E&RFTS at Sydenham. Sent to 3 ITW Hastings on 28th December 1939. Moved to 5 EFTS Hanworth on 25th February 1940 and then to 3 FTS South Cerney on 25th May. Posted to 6 OTU Sutton Bridge on 31st August to convert to Hurricanes. Joined 43 Squadron at Usworth on 21 September 1940. After sixteen training flights and two operational patrols, posted to 501 Sqd at Kenley on the 29 September. Shared a Ju88 on 4th October, claimed a Me109 destroyed on the 5th and another destroyed and a second shared on the 7th. Although Mackenzie shot down a number of German planes during and after the Battle of Britain, he will always be remembered for one particular incident over the English Channel. He was flying a Hawker Hurricane, its ammunition spent. His quarry was a Messerschmitt 109 fighter which tried to evade him by diving almost to sea level, intent on heading for France and safety. Mackenzie knocked it into the sea by the extraordinarily dangerous move – very definitely not recommended in any training manual – of using his plane’s wing to shear its tail off, sending it spiralling out of control. When the German plane went into the waves, Mackenzie nursed his damaged craft back to England, made a forced-landing at Hope Farm, west of Capel-le-Ferne outside Folkestone, in Hurricane V6799, with slight facial injuries (report below). His highly unorthodox manoeuvre earned him a DFC for skill and gallantry', the awed admiration of colleagues, and the nickname of 'Super Mac'. The incident instantly established him as one of the aces of 501 Squadron, which he had joined less than two weeks earlier. On 25th October Mackenzie claimed a Me109 destroyed, another shared and another damaged. In a later patrol that day he was in collision with P/O V Goth of 501, as he manoeuvred his section to attack a formation of Me109s. Mackenzie, in Hurricane V6806, baled out unhurt but Goth, in P2903, was killed when he crashed in Bridgehurst Wood, Marden. On 27th, 29th and 30th October he claimed Me109s destroyed, on 8th November a Me109 destroyed, on the 12th a Ju88 shared and on the 15th a Me109 destroyed and another damaged. Posted to 247 Sqd at Predannack on 19th June 1941 as a Flight Commander. He destroyed a Ju88 at night on 6th/7th July and a He111 at night over a convoy on the 12th/13th. On 29th September Mackenzie led a strafing attack on Lannion airfield in Brittany. Hit by heavy flak from the ground defences he ditched in the sea. He took to his dinghy, paddled to the shore and was captured. On his way to a PoW camp, Mackenzie gave his guard the slip on a crowded Paris railway station but was soon recaptured. At Oflag VIB at Warburg, northern Germany, which was predominantly an army camp, escape attempts were a major industry and Mackenzie joined the tunnelling team. Working 24 hours a day, they reached the perimeter wire but flooding prevented further work until the spring. On resuming in April 1942, Mackenzie was fortunate not to be buried alive when a ton of clay fell from the roof, he just managed to scramble clear. With rumours that the PoW's were to be transferred to another camp, the prisoners decided to risk breaking open the tunnel early. As the first prisoner crawled from the tunnel exit, a guard spotted him. Mackenzie and a colleague decided to build a one-use tunnel from a ditch close to the perimeter fence. A diversion was set up and the two men reached the ditch unseen. Hiding under blankets, they waited for nightfall when they planned to dig a shallow tunnel under the wire. As night fell a guard was seen taking a close interest in the area so another diversion was created and the two men were recalled into the compound. A few weeks later, Mackenzie was transferred to Stalag Luft III at Sagan. Over a long period of time he feigned madness and developed a severe stammer for the purpose, which subsequently he never completely lost. Repatriated to the UK in October 1944, arriving at Liverpool on the 10th. He was posted to 53 OTU Kirton-in-Lindsey on 19th December as an instructor. He launched into a highly effective new phase of his career as a trainer. Regarded as an exceptional instructor, he trained pilots during the rest of the war and afterwards, successfully adapting to a new generation of fighters such as the Gloster Meteor jet. On 17th June 1945 Mackenzie went to 61 OTU Keevil, as a Flight Commander. In July 1951 he was promoted to command the Meteor fighter wing at Stradishall in Suffolk, where he was also the chief instructor. He was awarded the AFC 1st January 1953.

Autobiography Hurricane Combat: the Nine Lives of a Fighter Pilot


Signed by Ken Wilkinson (616 Sqd), Vivian Snell (501 Sqd), Ken Mackenzie (501 Sqd), Les Harvey (54 Sqd)


78 MalińskiJan LeonardPlt OffP-1286PAFPolish302Sqn Polish
Krzyz Walecznych (x4)

Medal Lotniczy (x3)

Wound Badge
Hurricane2Died2006-06-02After 1939 campaign, deported to a prisoner-of-war camp, he escaped on March 28, 1940 and managed to get to France and later to England. From 01.07. until October 31, 1940, he actively participated in the Battle of Britain in 302 Sqd, later until 1942. and then moved to 307 Sqd until 1943. Sent to operate radar on a British cruiser from September 1943 to August 1945. In 1945/46 he flew in 229 Group India TC. He shot down two planes. Died in Ostrzeszów Wlkp. Age 89
Archiwum Database


Signed envelope

79 MartelLudwik AlfredPlt Off76812PAFPolish54Sqn

603Sqn

Virtuti Militari

Krzyz Walecznych (x3)

Srebrny Krzyż Zasługi

Medal Lotniczy (x3)

Wound Badge
Spitfire2Died2010-04-25Assigned to 54 Sqd RAF and then to 603 Sqd RAF. Served with 603 Sqd flying Spitfires from Hornchurch during the Battle. On October 25, 1940, six days before the end of the Battle of Britain, he was shot down in air combat. Despite the wounds, he managed to land his Spitfire. Half a year later, on March 19, 1941, he was transferred to 317 Sqd where he is the Commander of the Squadron. March 13, 1943 assigned with a group of Polish pilots to the Polish Fighting Team in North Africa, popularly known as Skalski's Circus which is part of RAF 145 Sqd. July 22, 1943 returns to 317 Sqd. The last assignment was 131 Polish Wing from October 14, 1946 until his release in January 1947.
Archiwum Database


Commemorating the 80th Anniversary of the Polish Air Force in 1998. The cover artwork by Tony Theobald shows a Fokker EV in Polish markings in 1919 which scored the Polish Air Force's first victory which was against the hostile Russians, the PZL IIc of 2nd Lt W Gnys who scored the first and second victories over the Luftwaffe on 1 September 1939, a Hawker Hurricane of No 303 Squadron during the Battle of Britain and a Supermarine Spitfire IX in D-Day invasion markings and Polish markings. Underneath a Polish built MiG 29 is shown to mark the new independent Polish Air Force after years of Soviet rule. The cover bears Polish Air Force 1918 - 1998 logo and the insignia of the 121st squadron, No 303 Squadron, No 316 Squadron and 1st Fighter Regiment which corresponds to the aircraft on the artwork. The cover has been flown in Spitfire Mk IX MH434 which was painted in Polish markings at the time from Duxford and return. The cover bears 30p Guernsey stamp showing a Hurricane Wellington Spitfire Lysnader Blenheim and Sunderland aircraft cancelled with 80th Annniversary of the Polish Air Force 5 November 1998 postmark. This cover is hand signed by Flight Lieutenant Ludwik Martel

80 McGlashanKenneth ButterworthPlt Off42138British245Sqn

96Sqn

87Sqn

536Sqn

264Sqn

25Sqn (CO)

AFC

HurricaneSurvived war30th July 2005 AustraliaBorn in Bearsden, Dunbartonshire Scotland 28 August 1920. Educated at Glasgow Academy. Training at 11 E&RFTS Perth March 1939. To 9 FTS Hullavington on 2 June. Joined 245 Sqd at Leconfield on 6 November. Flew Drem to Hawkinge on 28 May 1940 for the Dunkirk evacuation. 31 May shot down by a Me109 near Dunkirk. He was slightly wounded and blinded by oil and glycol in his eyes. With his Hurricane in a dive he pulled out just in time, blacked out and recovered to find himself travelling very fast and low along a beach. Forced-landed and rescued by British soldiers. French colonial troops had thought he was German. Walked into Dunkirk and got on a Thames paddle steamer. Landed late at night at Margate and was taken by squadron transport back to Hawkinge. On 17 December 1940 posted to 96 Sqd at Cranage for night-fighting operations. 17 November 1941 to 60 OTU East Fortune as an instructor. On 20th July 1942 joined 87 Sqd at Charmy Down. He took part in ground-strafing operations during the Dieppe raid on 19 August. Posted to 536 Sqd at Predannack on 12 September 1942, a Turbinlite Havoc night fighter unit. 25 January 1943 joined 264 Sqd at Warmwell. 15 June 1944 to Cairo opening up of Middle East air routes. with BOAC. Returned to the UK in January 1946 and joined No. 1 Ferry Unit at Pershore. 54 OTU in June, remaining there until October 1948, when he was given command of 25 Sqd at West Malling. AFC 8 June 1950). Green Endorsement in his log book on 21 August 1950: took off in bad weather to lead another Mosquito into Manston, leading it down through cloud and enabling it to land safely. Retired from RAF on 29 August 1958 as a Squadron Leader. Emigrated with his family to Australia in 1964.


81 MillardJocelyn George Power 'Joce'Plt Off83999British1Sqn

242Sqn

615Sqn

Air Efficiency Award

HurricaneSurvived war10th May 2010Born 23 February 1915. Educated St. Edmunds College near Ware, Hertfordshire from 1928 to 1931. Joined RAFVR in August 1937 as an Airman u/t Pilot whilst working for the de Havilland Aircraft Company. Week-end flying training at No. 1 E&RFTS Hatfield. Called up on 1st September 1939, he had completed his Service Flying Training course and had a total of 275 flying hours. October posted to 12 EFTS Prestwick for a flying instructors course. He instructed at 9 EFTS Ansty from April 1940, later moving to 12 FTS Grantham. 24 August he commissioned and posted to No. 1 School of Army Co-operation at Old Sarum. Volunteered for Fighter Command. 6 OTU Sutton Bridge on 4th September 1940, converted to Hurricanes joined 1 Sqd at Wittering on the 21 September. To 242 Sqd at Coltishall on 17 October and then to 615 Sqd at Northolt on 3 November. Probable Me109 on a sweep over France on 24 February 1941. March 1941 to CFS Upavon for an instructors course and in mid-April joined the staff at RAF College FTS Cranwell. He left for Canada in mid-July and began instructing at 35 SFTS there in September 1941. Canada until mid-May 1944, serving as Flying Instructor, Flight Commander, Examining Officer and Squadron Commander. Returned to the UK and went to Technical Training Command, for flying and administrative duties. Released from the RAF in 1947 as a Squadron Leader.


Signed envelope


82 MowatRobert InnesSgt974191British248Sqn

53Sqn

353Sqn

249Sqn

MBE

BlenheimSurvived war22nd October 2002Born Lybster, Caithness, Scotland 17 November 1915. Joined RAFVR on 8 December 1939 as an Airman u/t WOp/AG. Posted to 248 Sqd at Sumburgh on 9 October 1940. Joined 53 Sqd at Bircham Newton on 10 July 1941. 11 December 1941 to a Hudson ferrying unit for service in India. Joined 353 Sqd Dum Dum on 1 June 1942 and served in India and Burma until March 1944. Then to 294 Sqd, an Air Sea Rescue unit on Wellington and Walrus aircraft along the coast of North Africa, Egypt, Palestine and Cyprus. Back to the UK in February 1945, released from the RAF on 30 October 1945 as a Warrant Officer. MBE in 1998 for services to the Lhaidhay Croft Museum, Dunbeath.


39th Anniversary The Battle of Britain. Jeffrey Quill Test Pilot. Personally Signed by Robert I Mowat 248 Squadron Wireless Operator & Air Gunner Battle of Britain
83 NaishKenneth EdwardSgt45447British235Sqn

236Sqn

DFC
BlenheimSurvived war18th November 2007.Born 1913 Pontypridd Wales. Joined RAF in January 1936 as a direct-entry Airman u/t Pilot. Joined 235 Sqd in June 1940. On 24th August his Blenheim, Z5736, was attacked in error by Hurricanes of 1 Sqd (RCAF) Squadron over Thorney Island and badly damaged. He crashed on landing but he and his gunner, Sgt. H Owen, were unhurt.

Here he paired-up with Sergeant Kenneth ‘Skipper’ Naish, a 1936 direct entrant himself and newly transferred from Thorney Island. The morning of the 24th August 1940 offered a gentle sunrise and relative calm over the aerodrome at Detling: ‘Despite the chaotic conditions and increasing threats, outside ground crew filled sandbags and played an impromptu game of cricket using the spade as a bat as someone tossed a cricket ball. Elsewhere on the station new panes of glass were being fitted. The smell of cut grass mingled with the stench of 100 percent high-octane fuel and oil, interspersed with the salty sea breeze’ (Coastal Dawn, Blenheims in Action, refers). At 15.40 p.m. Ventnor RDF reported a large enemy formation approaching the Isle of Wight and upon notification, controllers at 11 Group ordered Sqd Ldr Ernest McNab to scramble his fledgling Canadian pilots of 1 Sqd RCAF, some of whom had less than 20 hours of flying experience and only a limited period on aircraft recognition. At around the same time, three Blenheim fighters were scrambled from Detling to give protection over Portsmouth, Fighter Command being at full stretch. Chaos ensued. Rather than engage the enemy force of approximately fifty Ju. 88s of Lehrgeschwader 1, escorted by Bf 110s of a similar number, the British and Canadian pilots intercepted one another, the Canadians coming down from the 11 o’clock position and despatching Blenheim T1804 - piloted by David Woodger - into the Channel at Bracklesham Bay, near Chicester. This ‘friendly fire’ incident cast a long shadow over the two pairs of crew who managed to escape. Naish and Owen in Blenheim Z5736 managed to return to base, but both had been slightly injured and the aircraft damaged. In the late afternoon the body of an airman was found by a boat off West Wittering. It was Woodger’s gunner, Sergeant Daniel Wright: ‘The Gunner’s body was riddled with bullets. The limp body was wrapped in blankets and placed on a stretcher.’ The medical orderlies bowed their heads as the Adjutant, Flying Officer Charles Pinnock said: “I can’t give you a hand; You’re for the promised land, My comrade good and true.”

Commissioned in February 1941, Naish was posted away from 235 in July. DFC 19th May 1944 as a Flight Lieutenant with 236 Sqd. April 1944 he had taken part in an attack on a convoy off the Dutch coast. His aircraft was hit by flak and one engine set alight but he pressed home his attack. Whilst putting out the flames, he was heavily engaged by ship and shore flak batteries. Naish got back to base and made a successful crash-landing. Released in 1945, as a Squadron Leader. He rejoined the RAF in 1946 and served for some years in the Fighter Control Branch.




84 NeilThomas Francis 'Ginger'Plt Off (later W/C)47651RAFVRBritish249Sqn

41Sqn (CO)

DFC & Bar

AFC

Air Efficiency

Bronze Star (USA)

Hurricane1311 July 2018 Age 96Joined RAFVR on 17 October 1938 at age 18. Posted to No. 8 Flying Training School 1 December 1939. Posted 15 May 1940 to 249 Sqd RAF at RAF Church Fenton. Flew Hurricanes from RAF North Weald during the Battle of Britain alongside Tich Palliser. The enemy aircraft he destroyed with the squadron included six Messerschmitt Bf 109s, two Heinkel He 111s, a Messerschmitt Bf 110, a Junkers Ju 87, a Junkers Ju 88 and a Dornier Do 17. Flew 141 combat missions during the Battle of Britain. 7 November 1940 mid-air collision with another Hurricane and lost the rear section of his aircraft. Managed to bail out and survived with a minor leg injury. Asked in an interview how he survived so many missions virtually unscathed, he said that in addition to being very lucky and spending a lot of time ducking and weaving, it is important in aerial combat to have the sensitivity to know instinctively what is around you and he was lucky to have that ability. DFC on 8 October 1940 and a Bar 26 November 1940. He embarked with 249 Squadron on HMS Furious on 10 May 1941 and sailed for Gibraltar. On arrival the squadron transferred to Ark Royal. The squadron flew to Ta' Qali on 21 May to take part in the Battle of Malta and he shot down a Macchi C.200 fighter on 12 June 1941. On 26 December 1941 Neil left Malta and in 1942 he became tactics officer for No. 81 Group, then he served with No. 56 OTU and was officer commanding 41 Sqd. He then became liaison officer to the US 9th Army Air Force's 100th Fighter Wing. This posting led to the award of the Bronze Star Medal. He was awarded the AFC in the 1950s and retired from the RAF in 1964 at the rank of Wing Commander in 1964.

Caterpillar Club badge, gold with ruby eyes, engraved to reverse 'P/O. T. F. Neil. DFC Pres. by Irving Co.', with original safety chain, extremely fine Thomas Francis 'Ginger' Neil was born on 14 July 1920 at Bootle, Merseyside, and educated at Eccles Grammar School. After taking his School Certificate in 1937 he took work at the District Bank in Gorton whilst training to be a pilot with the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve from 17 October 1938. Called up for full-time service at the outbreak of the Second World War, Neil was commissioned Pilot Officer and posted on 15 May 1940 to 249 Sqd based at Church Fenton and North Weald. Baling out over the Garden of England - Caterpillar Club Member Awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross on 8 October 1940, Neil faced a serious mishap on 7 November 1940 when he collided with the Hurricane flown by Wing Commander Francis Victor Beamish, DSO AFC losing the rear section of his aircraft. The exact circumstances were uniquely described by Neil in a television interview conducted in 2016: 'The aircraft became uncontrollable and this was at 18,000 feet… I think it was, and I didn't really get out of the aircraft until about 2,000 feet, so I spent a long time in the aeroplane trying to make sense of an aircraft that didn't have a tail and I eventually got out. I landed in the top of a tree at a place called Walberswick in Kent, and when I came round I was surrounded by four sets of feet, two belonging to ladies and two belonging to men, and they were discussing whether I was on their side or the other side. The two ladies thought I looked English and that kept me going so to speak. The two men thought I looked German and they wanted to hang me and, anyhow, two Army officers rushed up and prevented them from doing that… and that's the story how I continued to serve in the Air Force for twenty odd years.' (Interviewer) 'What happened to Beamish's aircraft? Did he land OK?' (Neil) 'Yes, yes, he was out and totally fearless.' (Interviewer) 'I hope he bought you a beer!' (Neil) 'Pardon?' (Interviewer) 'I hope he bought you a beer…' (Neil) 'No! He said he was sorry… He was a wonderful man, and they all thought I'd been killed and never seen again because I disappeared through cloud… until I turned up the same night.' Beamish made a forced landing near Leeds Castle and was awarded the D.F.C. the next day (London Gazette 8 November 1940, refers). Neil was awarded a Bar to his DFC on 26 November 1940 and later fought during the Battle of Malta, shooting down a Macchi C.200 fighter on 12 June 1941. Appointed Officer Commanding 41 Sqd, Neil later became liaison officer to 100 Fighter Wing, USAAF. and was awarded the Bronze Star Medal. Taking retirement from the RAF in 1964, Neil settled in Norfolk where he became a director in the shoe industry. In paying tribute to Neil, David Brocklehurst, MBE Chairman and Historian at the Battle of Britain Museum Trust said: 'We are greatly saddened by his death and our hearts go out to Tom's family - we have lost a true friend. He was the epitome of a Battle of Britain pilot. It was a great honour to have known him.'


Tom recalls bailing out of his Hurricane. (original on YouTube)




Caterpillar Club Pin
85 NichollsDouglas Benjamin FletcherSgt114121RAFVRBritish87Sqn

242Sqn

151Sqn

258Sqn

DFC
HurricaneSurvived war6th December 2014.Landed safely after Hurricane X (P5182) damaged in battle with Ju 88 over the North Sea at 07:30hrs on the 30 September 1940.

Born near Swansea Wales 5 February 1919. Educated South Parade School and St James School, in Grimsby. Joined RAFVR in September 1938 as an Airman u/t Pilot. Elementary flying training at 6 EFTS Sywell. To 8 FTS Montrose for No. 19 Course from 6th May to 16th August 1940. 5 OTU Aston Down on the 17 August but moved to 7 OTU Hawarden 2 daysn later. Converting to Hurricanes, joined 85 Sqd at Castle Camps on 4 September 1940. To 242 Sqd at Coltishall on the 11 September and he finally joined 151 Sqd at Digby on 21 September. On 30 Septemeber shared a Ju88 and returned to Digby but Hurricane P5182 was severely damaged by return fire. August 1941 to 258 Sqd at Martlesham Heath. To Debden 3 October for overseas deployment. Squadron pilots went to Abbotsinch on the 30 October and two days later sailed in HMS Athene for Gibraltar, with Hurricanes with wing-detached on board. After arriving the aircraft were due to be unloaded and taken by HMS Ark Royal to Malta later. However the carrier was sunk returning to Gibraltar so other plans were made. The 258 pilots left on Christmas Eve 1941 on the Athene. They berthed at Takoradi on 1st January 1942, disembarked, and the Athene left, taking their Hurricanes with her. On the 3rd they flew on the ferry route to the Middle East in a DC3, arrived at Port Sudan, from where they sailed in HMS Indomitable on the 9th, with Hurricanes aboard. They flew off on the 28th and later in the morning arrived at Airfield P2 at Palembang, Sumatra. In the afternoon they went on to Seletar airfield, Singapore and flew their first operation on 31st January. On 10th February 1942 the three surviving Hurricanes of 258 were withdrawn to Palembang. Of the fifteen surviving pilots, six were required to remain behind to fly with a reformed 605 Sqd. One was nominated, two volunteered and the other three were selected by cutting cards. Nicholls was one of the nine evacuated from Java to Ceylon in the SS Kota Gede. 258 Sqd was reformed at Ratmalana on 1st March 1942. Nicholls rejoined it on 7th March. Commissioned in December 1941, DFC 19th May 1944. August 1944 to HQ 224 Group, Burma as Squadron Leader Tactics. Returned to the UK in October 1945 and was released from the RAF in March 1946 as a Squadron Leader. After spells in Uganda and Botswsana he returned to Grimsby in 1978 and for four years taught at a local school before retiring. On 11th November 2011 he was present when a plaque on which he was honoured was unveiled at St. James School.

86 NorfolkNorman RobertPlt Off44929RAFBritish72Sqn

DFC
Spitfire4Survived war13th March 2005.Born 21st November 1912. RAF on 29th June 1936 as a trainee pilot. Serving with 72 Sqd at Leconfield by 15th October 1939. He was still with the squadron at the start of the Battle of Britain. Returned to Croydon with a severely damaged tail unit after combat with Me109’s off Dungeness on 1st September 1940. The next day, after damaging a Me110, he was shot down in combat over Herne Bay in Spitfire K9938, which crashed and burned out at Garrington Farm, near Bekesbourne emergency landing ground. Norfolk baled out, unhurt. On the 7th and 11th he destroyed Do17’s, on the 15th he probably destroyed a He111, on the 27th he destroyed a Do17 and probably another and on 25th October he damaged a Me110. Commissioned on 17th September 1940. DFC 7th January 1941, with at least four enemy aircraft destroyed.

Crash landed Spitfire I (K9938) 2 September 1940 at 13:00hrs after combat over Herne Bay.


Combat Report 1 September 1940


87 PageAlan GeoffreyPlt Off (later W/C)74709British56Sqn

OBE

DSO

DFC & Bar

Order of Orange-Nassau (Holland)

Hurricane15WIADied2000-08-07Cranwell RAF College before the war. Aimed to be an instructor but the shortage of trained fighter pilots at the outbreak of War changed that. At the start of the Battle of Britain he was a veteran at 20 with 3 months fighting experience. With 56 Sqd and destroyed 3 enemy aircraft during the Battle. Shot down in flames 12 August 1940, while attacking Do 17s. Baled out Hurricane I (P2970) 'Little Willie' over the Channel and was rescued, badly burned. DFC 30 July 1943. Later in 1943 Page rejoined an operational squadron and by July 1944 he was promoted to Wing Commander on the continent. In September he crashed during landing, smashing his face on the gun-sight and injuring his back. 29 December 1944 awarded the DSO.15 enemy aircraft destroyed. Lecture tour of the USA and when he returned in April once again went into hospital, this time to have a cannon splinter removed from his leg which had been there since August 1940! Then became a test pilot at Vickers-Armstrong. Passed away on 7 August 2000.


Signed envelope


Signed envelope: Christopher Foxley-Norris, Tom Gleave, Ginger Lacey, Geoffrey Page, Sandy Johnston, Mieczysław Sawicki

88 PalliserGeorge Charles Calder 'Titch'Sgt64891British17Sqn

43Sqn

249Sqn

605Sqn

DFC

Air Efficiency

Hurricane13Survived war24 September 2011 in Black Rock, Victoria, AustraliaCame from 43 Sqd when he joined 249 Sqd at RAF North Weald on 14 September 1940. He had a narrow escape on 29 October. When he was taking off from the former airfield and came under attack by bombers, debris hit Hurricane Mk I GN-H, damaging the propeller. With the aircraft shaking violently, he managed to circle the airfield and land. Palliser claimed 8 victories during the Battle of Britain.

Born in West Hartlepool England 11 January 1919. Educated at Brougham School and later attended a Technical School. Joined AFVR in 1939 as an airman under training as a pilot. Sergeant pilot at the outbreak of war. Posted to No. 3 ITW Hasting, moved to No. 11 EFTS Perth on 5 Dec 1939 and went to No. 6 Flying Training School at RAF Little Rissington in April 1940. Converted to Hurricanes at No. 6 OTU at RAF Sutton Bridge in July 1940. Joined 17 Sqd at RAF Debden on 3 August 1940 during the Battle of Britain. Moved to 43 Sqd at RAF Tangmere on 18 August 1940 and then 249 Sqd at RAF North Weald on 14 September 1940. During the Battle of Britain, claimed eight victories. Commissioned in April 1941 and embarked with 249 Sqd on HMS Furious on 10 May and sailed for Gibraltar. On arrival the squadron transferred to HMS Ark Royal. The squadron flew to Ta' Qali on 21 May 1941 to take part in the Siege of Malta. During that battle, he claimed a further five victories. In January 1942 posted to 605 Sqd as flight commander. DFC 30 January 1942. He left Malta on 26 February 1942 as one of the island's longest serving pilots. He was quoted as saying: 'But I wasn't there for medals. It was like a job. Fly, fly, shoot one down... start again the next day. I only said my prayers sometimes when I took off... when it was a tight battle... But that parachute on my back was like an angel by my side.' No. 25 Air School at Standerton, South Africa on 28 March 1942 to be an instructor at the school. Posted to No. 62 CFS, Bloemfontein on 17 July, to 2 EFTS Randfontein on 19 October and then to 4 EFTS Benoni on 2 September 1943. Admitted to Baragwanath Military Hospital in Johannesburg on 21 January 1944 and remained there until leaving for Great Britain on 24 May 1944. Instructed at No. 15 EFTS at RAF Kingstown from September 1944. He moved to No. 10 FTS at RAF Woodley on 19 September 1945, where he instructed until 16 March 1946. Instructor at the CFS at RAF South Cerney until October 1946, when he was posted as an instructor to No. 23 Flying School at Heany, Southern Rhodesia. In October 1947, retired from the RAF at the rank of flight lieutenant.


89 ParkinEric GordonPlt Off79734RAFVRBritish501Sqn
HurricaneSurvived war23 July 2008Born 21 April 1917 in Barnsley, Yorkshire England. Joined RAFVR on 13th September 1938 as an Airman u/t Pilot. Flying training 8 E&RFTS Woodley. Full-time service on 3 September 1939 and sent to 4 ITW Bexhill in November. In February 1940 was posted to 8 FTS Montrose. To 6 OTU Sutton Bridge on the 27 May. Converted to Hurricanes, posted to France. Joined 501 Sqd. Returned to the UK June. Re-assembled at Croydon on the 21 June. In the late evening of 31 July 1940 the squadron took off from Hawkinge to return to Gravesend. Parkin's aircraft had a starting problem and he took off later, arriving at Gravesend in failing light. He undershot the runway and touched coils of barbed wire on the boundary. The Hurricane turned over and Parkin was injured. He was admitted to Gravesend Hospital, later transferred to Halton and did not rejoin 501 until 5th February 1941. He said after the war that he fell asleep due to exhaustion during the final approach to Gravesend. Posted away for an instructors course on 16th April 1941 and was instructing until the end of the war. Parkin was released from the RAF in 1946, joined the RAFVR in 1947 and then rejoined the RAF in December 1953. He retired on 21st April 1972 as a Flight Lieutenant. Cremated on 4th August 2008 at Oxford Crematorium.



90 ParrottPeter LawrenceFg Off (later W/C)41054British145Sqn

605Sqn

DFC & Bar

AFC

Hurricane9Survived war27th August 2003.Born in Aylesbury on 28th June 1920. Lord Williams Grammar School. Joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his initial flying course at No. 1 E&RFTS Hatfield on 27th June 1938. Posted to 11 FTS Shawbury on 3rd September. No. 1 Armament Training School at Catfoss on 30th March 1939, towing targets. On 27th September 1939 Parrott went to No. 1 Air Armament School Manby as a staff pilot. Posted to 11 Group Pool at St. Athan on 28th December, converted to Hurricanes and then joined 2 Ferry Pilot Pool on 22nd January 1940. Joined 607 Sqd in France on 29th January 1940. Got 3 He111's destroyed, another two shared and one damaged on 10th May, and a He111 probably destroyed and another shared on the 11th. Jumped by Me109's near Louvain on the 13th and had his radio shot to pieces. Shared a probable Do17 on 16th May, posted him to 145 Sqd at Tangmere. On the 26th, over Dunkirk, he probably destroyed a He111 but was hit by return fire. Heading home, his engine seized as he crossed the coast in Hurricane I N2589 and he made a crash-landing in a field at Great Mongeham, near Deal. On 3rd July 1940 Parrott shared a probable He111, on the 15th shared a probable Do17, on the 18th shared a He111, on 8th August destroyed a Me109 and a Ju87 and on the 12th destroyed a Ju88. Posted to 605 Sqd at Croydon on 27th September. DFC. 1st November Parrott damaged a Me109. Acting as weaver on 1st December he was jumped by a Me109 and his Hurricane, Z2323, damaged. He dived to 3000 feet baled out over East Hoathly. He joined 501 Sqd at Martlesham Heath on 1st June. Posted overseas on 16th July 1943, Safi, Malta on 1st August. Joined 72 Sqd at Pachino, Sicily on the 10th as a supernumerary. Went to 111 Sqd, also at Pachino, as a Flight Commander. Destroyed a Mc202 on 4th September. Commanded 43 Squadron at Capodichino, Naples on 13th October 1943. On 26th November he shared in destroying a Ju88 and on 17th February 1944 he damaged a Me109. 6th March 1944 posted to the Middle East. Appointed OC Gunnery at 73 OTU Abu Sueir on 22nd May. Returned to Italy in early November 1944 and took command of 72 Sqd at Rimini on the 11th. HQ Desert Air Force, Italy on 15th February 1945. Bar to DFC. Group Training Inspector, Fighters and later Wing Commander Ops. He returned to the UK in June 1946. Training as a test pilot. Test-flew early versions of the Vampire and Meteor, as they were accepted into RAF service at Boscombe Down. AFC. Completed his service in the RAF on 10th July 1965 as a Wing Commander.


91 PattenHubert Paul FrederickFg Off40423RAFVRBritish64Sqn

307Sqn Polish

604Sqn

276Sqn

108Sqn

1435 Flight

255Sqn

Spitfire4Survived war24th December 2002Born 15 October 1917. Joined the RAF. Initial training at No. 1 E&RFTS Hatfield on 25 October 1937. Posted to 2 FTS Brize Norton on 9 January 1938. Joined 79 Sqd at Biggin Hill on 20 August 1938. In October 1938 to CFS Upavon for an instructors course but became ill and did not graduate. Joined 64 Sqd at Church Fenton on 1 April 1939. Over Dunkirk on 31 May 1940 Patten destroyed a Me110 and, flying from Kenley on 10 July, he destroyed another and damaged two. On 1st September 1940 he joined the newly-formed 307 Sqd (Polish) at Kirton-in-Lindsey, a night-fighter unit on Defiants, as 'B' Flight Commander with the rank of Acting Flight Lieutenant. May 1941 Patten moved to 604 Sqd at Middle Wallop. In the early hours of 5th July 1941, with F/Sgt. DG Moody as radar operator, he intercepted and shot down a He111 which crashed near Frome, Somerset. In October 1941 to Exminster as GCI Controller. Posted to 52 OTU Aston Down in February 1943 for a Spitfire refresher course. In May he joined 276 Sqd (Air Sea Rescue) at Harrowbeer as a supernumerary Squadron Leader. Posted to Air HQ Malta in June, where he served as Staff Officer Night Ops. December 1943 attached to 108 Sqd at Luqa, a Beaufighter night-fighter unit, then to HQ 242 Group Taranto later in the month, as a staff officer with Fighter Operations. In April and May 1944 Patten was serving with 1435 Squadron at Rimini as a supernumerary Squadron Leader, before joining 255 Sqd at Foggia, as a Flight Commander. During the night of 1st/2nd July 1944 he destroyed a Ju88. He returned to the UK in January 1945. Air Ministry until September and then on Mustangs at 61 OTU Keevil. Released from the RAF in October 1945.
92 PickeringTony Garforth 'Pick'Sgt114471RAFVRBritish32Sqn

501Sqn

601Sqn

131Sqn

MiD

Air Efficiency

Hurricane1Survived war24th March 2016Shot down 11 September 1940 at 15:45 in his Hurricane X (P5200) over Maidstone in Kent. No injuries. True, genuine and a modest hero to Britain. Died Aged 70 years.

Born at Foxton, Leicestershire England 25 August 1920. Educated at Market Harborough Grammar School. April 1939 joined RAFVR at Coventry as an Airman u/t Pilo. Flying training at 9 E&RFTS Ansty. Called up on 1 September 1939. 3 ITW Hastings. To 15 EFTS Redhill on 23 November and then to 5 FTS Sealand on 27th April 1940. Posted from Sealand direct to 32 Sqd at Biggin Hill on 27 July and arrived there with two other newly-trained pilots, Sergeants RJK Gent and SAH Whitehouse. The CO, S/Ldr. J Worrall, concerned at their inexperience, sent them to 6 OTU on 3rd August. Having converted to Hurricanes they rejoined 32 later in August. Squadron was ordered north to Acklington for a rest. The CO, now S/Ldr. Crossley, said that Pickering, Gent and Whitehouse were not in need of a rest and they were posted to 501 Sqd at Gravesend on 27 August. In an action with Me109s over Caterham on 1st September Pickering was shot down in Hurricane P5200. He baled out, unhurt, and landed in the Guards Depot there, where he was initially suspected of being German. His aircraft crashed at Happy Valley, Old Coulsdon. 29 October a Me109 destroyed. Posted to 601 Sqd at Northolt on 20 December. On 14 February 1941 to 57 OTU Hawarden to be a test pilot at the MU there. Commissioned December 1941, Pickering became an instructor at 57 OTU on the 20th of the month. Returned to operations on 19 February 1943 joined 131 Sqd at Castletown as a Flight Commander. 7th January 1944 various appointments in the Exeter Sector, as Controller and Gunnery Officer among other things. On 11 February 1945 P posted to the Middle East and became a Squadron Commander at the B&GS, El Ballah. Returned to the UK in December 1945 and was released from the RAF later in the month as a Squadron Leader.


To celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Britain, HRH The Prince of Wales, patron of the Battle of Britain Fighter Association, commissioned the series of drawings by alumni and faculty of the Royal Drawing School. Drawing by Susan Wilson
93 PinfoldHerbert MoretonFlt Lt37021RAFBritish56Sqn (CO)

Hurricane1Survived war19th October 2009A colourful character! Born 5th February 1913. Joined the RAF September 1934. Posted to 5 FTS Sealand. To 6 Sqd at Ismailia, Egypt 5th September 1935. Posted to 64 Sqd at Martlesham Heath 19th March 1936. Joined 502 Sqd, Auxiliary Air Force at Aldergrove as Flying Instructor and Adjutant. To 3 FTS South Cerney 2nd July 1940 as an instructor followed by a refresher course at 5 OTU Aston Down on 11th August, converting to Hurricanes. Commanded 56 Sqd at North Weald 24th August 1940. He flew 14 operational sorties in the next five days, three in one day. The squadron only had nine operational pilots. On 1st September 56 was sent to Boscombe Down for replacements while remaining operational. On 30th September led the squadron to intercept a large raid heading for the aircraft factory at Yeovil. Destroyed a Do17 but hit by return fire, a glycol leak led to a forced landing at Warmwell. October 1940 Pinfold needed an annual medical examination at RAF Hospital, Halton. His Adjutant, F/O Hudson, drove him there for the appointment. This trip was planned to get a long overdue squadron mascot, a dog. Having imbibed a fair amount of beer, the pair returned with a monkey, immediately named 109. Visiting dignitaries were told the monkey was trained to sit behind a pilot, looking backwards, to tap the pilot on the shoulder when a German Me109 fighter appeared on his tail. The monkey never did get airborne and one day disappeared into the woods at dispersal. In mid-December 1940 the squadron returned to North Weald to take part in sweeps over France. Left the squadron on 17th January 1941 for instructor duties at 10 FTS Ternhill. From 2nd January to 16th July 1945 at RAF Staff College, then on the staff at Air HQ Kandy, Ceylon and later Singapore. Involved in examining a Soviet MiG-21 that had been flown to Sweden by a defecting Soviet pilot and handed over to the RAF. During a later thaw in the 'Cold War' Pinfold was able to meet his Russian counterparts, who asked for the return of the aircraft as a goodwill gesture. The RAF was happy to do this but by then the MiG had been dismantled with various areas sawn up to measure the qualities of the various metals. The components were loaded into a container and shipped to Russia, together with a bottle of whisky with a label tied to the neck saying 'Sorry !'.


Signed envelope

94 QuillJeffery KindersleyFOBritish65Sqn

OBE

AFC

Spitfire0.51996-02-20Born 1913. Joined RAF 1931 on a short service commission. Test pilot for Supermarine. Joined 65 Sqd 5 August 1940 during the Battle to see how to improve the Spitfire in combat. Very active member of the Squadron. At around 13:30hrs on 18 August he helped Ernest Glaser to shoot down a He 111 flown by Rudolf Ahrens from I Gruppe of Kg 1. Left Squadron 24th August 1940 to return to Supermarine. Flew a captured Bf 109 and commented in his book ('Spitfire a Test Pilot's Story') that had he flown one sooner, he would not have had so much respect for them.



95 RichPeter GodfreySgt939496RAFBritish25Sqn

BlenheimSurvived warJoined the RAF in October 1939 as an Aircrafthand. Volunteered for air crew duties. Posted to 25 Sqd as an air gunner in June 1940. He served throughout the Battle. When the squadron's Blenheims were replaced by Beaufighters he was posted with the other gunners to Bomber Command and served at OTUs at Kinloss and Whitby. August 1941 posted to join the newly formed 458 Sqd RAAF at Holme-on-Spalding Moor, operating Wellingtons. In early 1942 he was posted away from 458 when it left for the Middle East and sent on a gunnery instructors course. He then instructed at Dalcross near Inverness followed by postings to Castle Kennedy and later Bishops Court in Northern Ireland. He was released from the RAF in early 1946 as a Warrant Officer. He later settled in South Africa.


Signed by Peter Rich, Noel Corry, Kenneth Lusty

96 RobinsonDenis NormanSgt60515RAFVRBritish152Sqn

Spitfire5Survived war28th July 2015Crashed Spitfire I (R6811) at Bestwell after combat with Bf 109s off Swanage 8 August 1940 at16:15hrs. The aircraft burned up but he escaped injury.

Born 24 June 1918 at Christchurch, Dorset England. Educated at the Stationers Company School at Hornsey, London. Joined RAFVR in March 1938 as an Airman u/t Pilot. Training at 21 E&RFTS Stapleford, 26 E&RFTS Oxford and 22 E&RFTS Cambridge. Posted to 152 Sqd at Acklington on 21 June 1940. He destroyed a Me109 on 25 July and destroyed another on 5th August. 15th August 1940 Me109 destroyed, on the 17 August a Ju87 and on 4 September a Ju88. On 26 September posted to CFS Upavon. 7 October instructing at 6 FTS Little Rissington. Commissioned in January 1941. On 17 November 1941 sent to instruct in Canada at 39 SFTS Swift Current then briefly at 35 SFTS North Battleford and finally at 32 OTU Patricia Bay until 19 June 1944 when he returned to the UK. Went to 109 OTU, Crosby on 27 August 1944 to convert to transport aircraft and on 1 March 1945 he was seconded to BOAC at Whitechurch. Released from the RAF in 1946, as a Flight Lieutenant. Joined BOAC, later British Caledonian and British Island Airways before retiring in 1978.

Denis Robinson: A Spitfire Pilot's Story

Archive report



97 RoseJackFg Off41472British3Sqn

32Sqn

232Sqn

CMG

MBE

DFC

Hurricane3DiedBorn in London on 1917-11-18, attended Shooters Hill School, University at UCL (studying Science). Joined the RAF in 1938. Flying Officer/ Wing Commander. From Biggin Hill sent to France. Shot down 3 enemy aircraft in May 1940. He was shot down in Hurricane V6547 at 1900 hrs. on August 25 1940 by a Bf109 over the Channel and rescued. DFC 1942-10-09. Commanded 113 Sqd in Burma from November 1944. MBE and CGM in 1946. His DFC citation says 'He has been on operational flying since September 1939. During May 1940 whilst serving with fighters over France, he destroyed three enemy aircraft. Posted to his present unit, he has led squadrons in 15 sweeps over France. He has displayed courage and devotion to duty and rendered valuable assistance to allied wing commanders'.
98 RoseStuart Nigel 'Rosebud'Plt Off81920British602Sqn

MiD

Air Efficiency

Spitfire22017Born in 1918. Felsted School in Essex from 1932 to 1935. Joined RAFVR at Southampton in December 1938. Logged 87 flying hours before being called up at the outbreak of war. Training completed on 17 June 1940. Commissioned on the 18th and he joined 602 Sqd flying Spitfires from Drem on the 20th. Claimed a Bf 110 destroyed on 25 August and on 7 September he shared a Bf 110. Wounded on the 11th September. Sick until 6 October 1940. Probably destroyed a Bf 109 on the 29th and on 6 November he shared a Ju 88. Promoted to Flying Officer in June 1941, posted to 54 Sqd in September. Instructor and later served in the Middle East. He was released from the RAF in February 1946, as a Squadron Leader.


99 RussellAnthony GeraldSgt120491RAFVRBritish43Sqn

145Sqn

HurricaneSurvived warApril 2010Born 18 September 1920 in Coulsdon, Surrey England. Joined the Royal Navy in 1938. Under age and discharged. Joined RAFVR in February 1939 as an Airman u/t Pilot. 5 OTU Aston Down on 1 September 1940. Converting to Hurricanes, joined 43 Sqd, with Sergeants Stoodley and Toogood, at Usworth on 28 September 1940. Stoodley died in a night-flying accident on 24 October and Toogood died on the 27, probably through oxygen failure. Russell sent on leave by CO. 10 November posted to Tangmere to join 145 Sqd. Commissioned in April 1942. No further details till released from the RAF in 1946 as a Flight Lieutenant.


Signed by Pete Brothers, John Ellacombe, Anthony Russell, Derek Yapp
100 SandersJames Gilbert 'Sandy'Flt Lt37510British111Sqn

615Sqn

253Sqn

DFC
Hurricane16Survived warAugust 2002.Wing Commander James Sanders DFC was the third RAF pilot to fly the Hurricane while with 111 Sqd, the first RAF unit to get the Hawker Hurricane. By the end of May 1940 he had over 1,000 hours on Hurricanes. A gifted pilot he amassed 16 victories and gained the DFC during the Battle of France.

Born in Richmond, Surrey England 19 June 1914. Educated in Genoa, Italy until the age of 19. Joined the RAF on a short service commission, beginning his training on 25th November 1935. Posted to 10 FTS Ternhill on 1st February 1936 and after completing his training joined 111 Squadron on 10th August. 4 October 1939 joined 615 Sqd at Croydon as 'B' Flight Commander. On 15 November led his flight of Gladiators to Merville France in company with those of 607 Sqd. On 29 December 1939 during a weather test chased He 111 up to 23,000 feet and used up all his ammunition, but lost it in cloud. Hit by return fire, he crash-landed near Valenciennes, badly concussed. On 17 May 1940 destroyed a Ju88 of 7/LG1 near Lille, one of three enemy aircraft he claimed whilst in France. However again return fire caused a forced-landing. Returned to Kenley on the 20 May. 'G' Flight Commander on 23rd May with up of six Gladiators. Attached to 604 Squadron at Manston for operations. DFC 4th June 1940. Destroyed a Me110 and damaged another on 22nd June in Hurricane P2487. Probable Me109 on the 30 June. Damaged two He111s on 16 August, destroyed a He111 and a Ju88 and shared another Ju88 on the 18, shot down a Ju88 and damaged a He111 during the night of 24th/25th August. During the Battle of Britain he refused to leave 11 Group when 615 Sqd was rested, so he borrowed a Hurricane from 253 Sqd, flew three night sorties with it, on 9th, 13th and 25th September. In the early hours of the 25th he destroyed a He111. The attachment to 253 ceased on 28th September and Sanders was then attached to 66 Squadron at Gravesend, to help form 421 Flight. In 421's ORB he is listed as one of 421's original pilots. Specifically asked to lead a special Fighter Interception Unit. After a few days he was attached to the Fighter Interception Unit. On 14th October 1940 Sanders was given command of 422 Flight, which was attached to the FIU at Shoreham. The Flight formed the nucleus of 96 Sqd on its formation at Cranage on 18th December 1940. Sanders was made a Flight Commander in the new squadron. In January 1941 moved to 255 Squadron at Kirton-in-Lindsey in February. During the nights of 11th and 13th March probably destroyed He111s and on 7th April he damaged a Ju88. On 23rd June 1941 he was posted away to 60 OTU East Fortune and in September he became Squadron Leader Flying there. June 1942 he was made Wing Commander Flying at 53 OTU Llandow and later at 61 OTU Rednal. Later Station Commander at Hunsdon, Zeals and Hutton Cranswick.


RAF Kenley being attacked on 18 August 1940 by Dornier Do 17 bombers. 'Sandy' Sanders DFC about to give chase in Hawker Hurricane KW-R while in the background Supermarine Spitfires of 64 Sqd engage Messerschmidt Bf 109s.



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